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Refugees Australia

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WORLD
September 2, 2002 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shahid Qureshi paid a big price when he sought asylum in Australia. For six months, the 27-year-old Pakistani was locked up at a detention center in Melbourne. He slept on an old mattress in a small room with three other men. The entrance to the room had no door, and guards came in frequently during the night to shine a flashlight in his face and make sure he was still there. As many as 70 detainees shared three showers and four toilets.
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WORLD
September 2, 2002 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shahid Qureshi paid a big price when he sought asylum in Australia. For six months, the 27-year-old Pakistani was locked up at a detention center in Melbourne. He slept on an old mattress in a small room with three other men. The entrance to the room had no door, and guards came in frequently during the night to shine a flashlight in his face and make sure he was still there. As many as 70 detainees shared three showers and four toilets.
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NEWS
January 5, 2002 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thurgam al Abbadi has never been convicted of a crime or sentenced to prison, but he is locked up indefinitely here behind high metal fences and razor wire. A refugee from Iraq, he has spent two years with his family in Australian detention centers. He has no idea when he will get out. "They think we are criminals," he said bitterly during a recent interview at the Villawood Immigrant Detention Center in suburban Sydney. "There is no freedom."
NEWS
January 5, 2002 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thurgam al Abbadi has never been convicted of a crime or sentenced to prison, but he is locked up indefinitely here behind high metal fences and razor wire. A refugee from Iraq, he has spent two years with his family in Australian detention centers. He has no idea when he will get out. "They think we are criminals," he said bitterly during a recent interview at the Villawood Immigrant Detention Center in suburban Sydney. "There is no freedom."
NEWS
September 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Australia prepared today to transfer hundreds of refugees stranded on a Norwegian cargo vessel to a navy troop carrier after a court lifted an injunction against the move. Australia plans to ship the asylum seekers, mostly Afghans, to Papua New Guinea. From there, they will be flown to New Zealand and the island nation of Nauru. Premier John Howard has refused to let the refugees into Australia. He has been challenged by the Victoria state Council for Civil Liberties.
NEWS
September 20, 2001 | From Associated Press
About 100 Afghan refugees arrived Wednesday on the tiny Pacific island republic of Nauru after spending three weeks at sea, caught in an international dispute over who would take them. The refugees were from among 433 mostly Afghan asylum seekers saved from a sinking Indonesian ferry by a Norwegian freighter in late August. They were taken toward Australia but were denied entry as part of that government's hard line against illegal immigration. Nauru agreed to take them in exchange for $10.
NEWS
September 1, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 430 refugees stuck for days on a Norwegian cargo ship off Australia's Christmas Island will be sent to New Zealand and Nauru, where their claims for asylum will be heard, Australian Prime Minister John Howard said today.
NEWS
July 8, 1988 | JIM MANN and NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writers
Acknowledging that the U.S. attitude toward Indochinese refugees has changed in the past decade, the Reagan Administration sought Thursday to dampen Asian hopes for a major new international effort to deal with the increased flow of refugees from Vietnam and Cambodia. Secretary of State George P. Shultz and other U.S. officials reacted coolly to a recent proposal by the Assn. of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) for a new, U.N.
NEWS
December 23, 1995 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Who, at the beginning of the Yugoslav wars, would have thought that Germany would become the refuge of choice for the shellshocked, homeless Muslims of Bosnia-Herzegovina? Just three years ago, Germany was being pilloried, with critics calling it an abject failure in protecting foreigners already in its midst. Racist skinheads and neo-Nazis were prowling its streets, roughing up Africans, laying siege to Vietnamese workers' hostels, chanting, "Foreigners out!"
NEWS
September 4, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 430 refugees who were refused asylum in Australia departed today for Papua New Guinea aboard an Australian troop ship, ending a weeklong international standoff over their fate. The refugees, who were rescued at sea nine days ago by a Norwegian cargo vessel, were transferred Monday to the troop ship Manoora and set off this morning on the six- to 10-day journey to Papua New Guinea.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 9, 1996 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Father Ralph vs. Det. Jane. "The Thorn Birds" is the second highest rated miniseries in history with Nielsens that trail only "Roots." And now, coming soon to your television screen, again courtesy of producer David L. Wolper, more of Richard Chamberlain as tormented, love-struck Father Ralph de Bricassart in "The Thorn Birds: The Missing Years." Not missing long enough.
NEWS
January 4, 2002 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
By day, Amal Hasan dreams of Australia--a utopia where someday she will join her husband, rebuild her life and reside in safety. But at night when she closes her eyes, her dream turns to horror and she relives the tragedy of Oct. 19, when an overloaded refugee boat taking her to Australia sank off the island of Java, killing hundreds. Over and over, she sees her fellow refugees struggling underwater, unable to reach the surface.
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