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Refugees Azerbaijan

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NEWS
June 7, 1992 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An angry crowd of war refugees hammered on the barred wooden doors of the presidential palace here, hurling abuse about Azerbaijan's crushing defeat by Armenia in the fight for Nagorno-Karabakh. "There is nobody helping us in Baku. We need houses. Why have you abandoned us?" shouted 34-year-old Rafile Aslanova, a woman who fled on foot last month from Shusha, the last Azerbaijani town to fall to the advancing Armenian forces.
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NEWS
August 25, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An estimated 80,000 to 100,000 Azerbaijanis, forced to flee their homes by a massive Armenian offensive in southwestern Azerbaijan, are heading toward the Iranian border as the ethnic war in Nagorno-Karabakh widens into a full-scale international conflict. Up to 2,000 Azerbaijani refugees have already crossed into Iran, and thousands of people are streaming toward the border behind them, reported Mahmoud Said, the U.N. representative in Baku, the Azerbaijani capital.
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NEWS
August 25, 1993 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An estimated 80,000 to 100,000 Azerbaijanis, forced to flee their homes by a massive Armenian offensive in southwestern Azerbaijan, are heading toward the Iranian border as the ethnic war in Nagorno-Karabakh widens into a full-scale international conflict. Up to 2,000 Azerbaijani refugees have already crossed into Iran, and thousands of people are streaming toward the border behind them, reported Mahmoud Said, the U.N. representative in Baku, the Azerbaijani capital.
NEWS
June 7, 1992 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An angry crowd of war refugees hammered on the barred wooden doors of the presidential palace here, hurling abuse about Azerbaijan's crushing defeat by Armenia in the fight for Nagorno-Karabakh. "There is nobody helping us in Baku. We need houses. Why have you abandoned us?" shouted 34-year-old Rafile Aslanova, a woman who fled on foot last month from Shusha, the last Azerbaijani town to fall to the advancing Armenian forces.
NEWS
March 1, 1992 | From Reuters
The government of Azerbaijan declared three days of mourning Saturday after the republic suffered heavy losses in an upsurge of fighting with Armenia over the disputed territory of Nagorno-Karabakh. The Baku government said many people had died in the battle for the strategic town of Khojaly, captured by Armenian fighters Wednesday. Correspondents in the area said large numbers of bodies were being brought down the hillsides by refugees.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | Associated Press
Kremlin officials beefed up security at airports and power plants in the republics of Azerbaijan and Armenia on Saturday and scrambled to aid an estimated 150,000 refugees who have fled their homes in fear of ethnic violence, Soviet media reported. The Moscow leadership also ripped into the Communist Party and government leaders of the rival republics for failing to halt the wave of communal rioting that has killed at least 28 people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1994
I cannot help but respond to the article by Raffi K. Hovannisian (Commentary, Feb. 25), arguing that Washington has not given sufficient consideration to the needs of Armenia. Armenia might find more sympathy in the United States and the world if it were not engaged in a war of aggression against Azerbaijan--a war in which Armenian forces have occupied 25% of my country, looted and burned hundreds of villages, created a million refugees, killed more than 16,000 and wounded another 50,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 1993 | ELENA BONNER, Dr. Elena Bonner, international human-rights activist, is the widow of Andrei Sakharov, the dissident Soviet physicist and Nobel Prize winner who led the Soviet human-rights movement. This was translated from the Russian by Catherine Fitzpatrick
Armenia today reminds me of Leningrad in 1941-43, when it was besieged by Hitler's army for 900 days. The bread ration is less than half a pound per person a day. There is no electricity, television, radio, newspapers. Telephones aren't working. Homes have no heat or hot water. Garbage hasn't been collected all winter--in some places mounds are four stories high. Refugees are living in freezing metal cisterns formerly used to store gasoline.
NEWS
January 30, 1990 | MASHA HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Azerbaijani Jews, fleeing by the thousands, are the latest refugees to arrive here from the troubled capital of Baku. Fearful of becoming the next target in the bloody ethnic warfare in the southern Soviet republics, they are desperately seeking permission to leave for Israel or the United States. Some of the refugees report incidents of Jews being beaten or threatened by Muslim extremists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1999 | ROY A. MEDVEDEV, Roy A. Medvedev is a Russian historian living in Moscow. He is the author of "Khrushchev" (1983) and other books on Soviet-Russian history
The national indignation in Russia about the bombing of Yugoslavia by NATO air forces is so strong that it is becoming an important factor in Russia's foreign and domestic policy and it may influence the outcome of the conflict. What has produced this howl of rage, supported not only by all opposition politicians but also by pro-Western politicians? I'm not talking here of geopolitical theories that circulate among politicians, diplomats, military strategists and analytical observers.
NEWS
October 15, 1991 | JONATHAN PETERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The railroad station where trains used to whistle by with food and other precious cargo is ghostly quiet. Somewhere over the brown hills of Azerbaijan, which rise just beyond this grape-growing village, thousands of Armenia-bound rail cars have screeched to an unscheduled halt. In its moment of national liberation, land-locked Armenia must scramble just to survive. "When they close down the railroads, Armenia gets nothing," said Babken Araktyan, the deputy chairman of Armenia's Parliament.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sign of growing Kremlin concern over a storm of regional unrest that is rooted as much in social, political and economic neglect as in ethnic hatred, the Communist Party newspaper Pravda warned Saturday that the country's reforms are threatened by "civil confrontation, chaos and instability."
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