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Refugees Bosnia Herzegovina

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NEWS
November 12, 1992 | Associated Press
A French company has saved 12,000 pairs of confiscated jeans from court-ordered destruction and sent them to needy refugees in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The 19-ton truckload left this southeastern French city Tuesday night for the central Bosnian towns of Zenica and Travnik, which are crowded with refugees from areas captured by Serbian forces in the war-torn republic.
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NEWS
July 21, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
Bosnian police removed roadblocks set up by Muslim refugees near a village where dozens of former moujahedeen fighters are due to be evicted from Serbian-owned houses next week. Police arrested at least 19 protesters at one of the two roadblocks at the village of Bocinja after they refused to move, said Alun Roberts, spokesman for the United Nations police force in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The detainees were later released.
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NEWS
August 8, 1992 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old man sat quietly in his wheelchair as the crowd of Bosnian refugees surged past him toward the train that was waiting on the tracks, the train that would take them far away from war. A German doctor shook his head no. The children would have to come first. If the old man noticed, he gave no sign.
NEWS
October 2, 1998 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The war ruins of a Coca-Cola plant here don't offer much in the way of furniture, so the first arrivals from Kosovo had to make do. Stuff a cushion into a plastic Coke crate, and it becomes a baby's chair. Lie down on a wooden pallet scavenged from the warehouse, and you have a bed. And the empty ammo crate that carried a dozen 60-millimeter mortar bombs for Serbian fighters on Bosnia's former front line makes a fine stool now that the war is raging in another place: This time, in your homeland.
SPORTS
February 27, 1994 | MIKE DOWNEY
No other ninth-graders at Anaheim Unified have been where he has been, seen what he has seen. One minute, he was playing soccer with his friends. Next, he was a boy with no face. What grotesquely remained of it was on CNN and on the cover of Newsweek, painted crimson with blood. Weeks later he was 8,000 miles from home and his life had been saved. His vision had not. Classmates have scant awareness of what it must be like to be Sead Bekric, a war's most innocent bystander.
NEWS
August 3, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Mirela Kerla, 15 years old and a witness to war, wears a gauze patch over her right eye and three strands of knotted red thread around her left wrist. They are reminders of the place she has come to and the place she has left behind. The makeshift red bracelet was given to Mirela last week--a good luck charm fashioned by a neighbor lady in Bosnia, Mirela's homeland.
NEWS
November 8, 1992 | Times Wire Services
Ethnic Croats frustrated by delays in a promised evacuation tried to walk out of this besieged city Saturday, but they were turned back by armed guards. The guns were mostly silent in the capital, but the fighting raged on elsewhere in the country. And for the first time, U.N. peacekeepers fired back when their vehicles were attacked. British soldiers on a reconnaissance mission returned fire after they drove into a gun battle at Ribnica, 20 miles south of Tuzla, in central Bosnia-Herzegovina.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1993 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For about a year now, the Primer family has been riveted to the television. Death counts from their disintegrating homeland of Bosnia drone on inside their Mission Viejo apartment. They flip on the electronic images of destruction upon awakening each morning and shut off the talking heads just before going to bed. Even their 2-year-old daughter Andrea's bright blue eyes recognize the ever-present CNN Headline News on the screen.
NEWS
July 13, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fresh from their capture of the Srebrenica "safe area," Bosnian Serb forces on Wednesday took control of a United Nations peacekeeping camp, rounding up and expelling thousands of desperate, terrified Muslim refugees, U.N. officials said. A triumphant Gen.
NEWS
July 27, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the final days before the fall of Zepa, the young and old fled into the hillside forests under cover of darkness. Down below, government soldiers struggled to stand their ground in trenches that shook with the roar of artillery. Then, the tanks rolled in, and the Bosnian Serb takeover of a second U.N. "safe area" in as many weeks was complete. Their defensive lines broken, the poorly armed soldiers joined the villagers in flight, while civilian leaders negotiated a desperate evacuation.
NEWS
September 1, 1998 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ending a two-day visit to Bosnia, Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Monday pressed national leaders to speed the return of refugees to their former homes, a step seen as vital to rebuilding the nation still deeply divided in the wake of a bitter ethnic war. "This is a tough challenge, but it must be met," Albright said at a news conference at the end of her trip.
NEWS
May 21, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON and MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Razija Tabakovic stepped from the Optima Tours bus into a rainstorm. The 17-hour trip from Germany had left her tired, bewildered and dispirited. Now she had arrived at the town that would become her new home. "The sky was crying along with me," she said later. Tabakovic had been here before--the first time as a child. Burned out of their village in World War II, she and her family walked 18 miles to then-safe Sanski Most. She was 6. At 59, Tabakovic is a three-time refugee.
NEWS
May 10, 1997 | From Reuters
The United States is ready to take in 5,000 Bosnian refugees whose right to stay in Germany has expired and who cannot return home because of fears for their safety, the German Interior Ministry said Friday. Kurt Schelter, a state secretary in the ministry, received assurances that the United States will take in the refugees, some of whom would be reunited with their families there, during talks at the U.S. State Department on Wednesday.
NEWS
January 8, 1997 | Reuters
A knife-wielding Bosnian refugee facing deportation hijacked an Austrian Airlines plane Tuesday but was disarmed by Berlin police commandos who secretly boarded the plane and pushed him out an open door. No one aboard was hurt. Police said the 39-year-old man, whose permit to live in Germany was to expire next Tuesday, fell about 21 feet to the tarmac at Berlin's Tegel Airport, where he was overpowered and detained.
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first blast jarred 60-year-old Zuria Brodlic from his small bed onto the cold concrete floor. The second blast threw patrolling U.S. Army soldiers to the ground and covered them with glass, bricks and debris. Within 45 minutes, nine houses belonging to Muslim families around this village in northeastern Bosnia-Herzegovina were blown apart. The Nov.
NEWS
November 14, 1996 | From Associated Press
With hundreds of Bosnian Muslims threatening to reclaim their Serb-held homes by force, U.S. Secretary of State Warren Christopher told Bosnia's leaders Wednesday that freedom of movement is essential to peace. He said tensions are rising to a critical point. Christopher told the three joint presidents of the battered country that refugees everywhere in Bosnia-Herzegovina--possibly 2 million or more--have a right to choose where to live.
NEWS
July 16, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Panicked residents of the eastern enclave of Zepa besieged U.N. posts and pleaded for the world's help Saturday as Bosnian government soldiers battled Serbian rebels threatening to overrun the U.N.-designated "safe area." Bosnian Serb troops, fresh from the capture of the nearby safe area of Srebrenica, shelled Zepa for a second day, and skirmishes were reported on the southwest edge of the Muslim enclave. U.N.
NEWS
November 18, 1996 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first blast jarred 60-year-old Zuria Brodlic from his small bed onto the cold concrete floor. The second blast threw patrolling U.S. Army soldiers to the ground and covered them with glass, bricks and debris. Within 45 minutes, nine houses belonging to Muslim families around this village in northeastern Bosnia-Herzegovina were blown apart. The Nov.
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Worldwide impatience and demands for swift repatriation are hampering work with the refugees of Bosnia and Rwanda, humanitarian fieldworkers and policymakers declared at a conference at Princeton University this week. Conference participants pleaded with politicians and the public to understand that speed is an enemy when dealing with the attempted resettlement of 27 million refugees throughout the world. "Healing the wounds takes time," said Sadako Ogata of Japan, the U.N.
NEWS
July 1, 1996 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Safet and Zijo Hadzijic, two scared brothers who fled this divided city three years ago, returned home Sunday to vote in the first free elections in Bosnia since war swept the country in 1992. It took the two Muslim men 15 hours on a crowded bus to get here from the Adriatic coast of Croatia, where they have been living with their elderly mother in a one-room apartment since being released from a Bosnian Croat camp at the height of the war.
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