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Refugees Burundi

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NEWS
August 26, 1988 | Associated Press
Burundi's leader said Thursday that his soldiers killed civilians in reprisals for the massacres of rival tribesmen, and he said the death toll from ethnic violence in the central African nation could be more than 5,000. The leader, Maj. Pierre Buyoya, was quoted on state-run Radio Burundi, monitored in neighboring Rwanda. More than 41,000 Burundians have fled to Rwanda to escape fighting between the majority Hutu and the minority Tutsi, who control Burundi's government and military.
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NEWS
February 22, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hopes of an end to Burundi's intractable war inched forward Monday as warring factions relaunched peace negotiations under the mediation of former South African President Nelson Mandela. The presence of Mandela and the backing of an array of world leaders have helped propel Burundi into the international spotlight. Mandela urged Burundians to make good use of their moment on the world stage.
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NEWS
October 8, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Carl and Eleanor Johnson first came here, their primary goal as missionaries for the Protestant Brethren Assemblies was to preach the Gospel. Fifty years later, their assignment has moved beyond spreading the word to serving as inadvertent hosts of a camp filled with 5,000 refugees who have fled the ethnic terror that threatens to tear this tiny Central African nation apart.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Carl and Eleanor Johnson first came here, their primary goal as missionaries for the Protestant Brethren Assemblies was to preach the Gospel. Fifty years later, their assignment has moved beyond spreading the word to serving as inadvertent hosts of a camp filled with 5,000 refugees who have fled the ethnic terror that threatens to tear this tiny Central African nation apart.
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | Associated Press
An estimated 7,000 people, some suffering from malnutrition or land-mine wounds, have fled to neighboring Zaire to escape fighting in northern Burundi, a refugee official said Saturday. The refugees are escaping clashes between extremists of the Hutu majority and the army, led by the Tutsi minority. Escalating violence in the tiny African nation since mid-December has renewed fears that Burundi might explode into ethnic massacres similar to the Rwandan genocide of 1994.
NEWS
May 1, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 1,000 Burundians fled to eastern Zaire from Burundi after a reported Hutu rebel attack, aid officials said. In neighboring Tanzania, a senior government official said that up to 40 Burundian Hutus were crossing into the East African country daily after being forced out of their country by the Tutsi-dominated army. A senior aid official reported that fighting in Burundi had taken an upward swing. U.N.
NEWS
August 20, 1988 | Reuters
Order has been restored after tribal massacres in Burundi that sent up to 10,000 refugees fleeing into neighboring Rwanda, diplomats said Friday. It was not known how many people died in the conflict between the Tutsi and Hutu tribes. The official Burundian news agency ABP said the toll appeared to be very great but gave no numbers. The Hutu is the majority tribe in Burundi, but the minority Tutsi controls the military and rules the country.
NEWS
August 22, 1988 | From Reuters
Refugees fleeing tribal massacres in Burundi on Sunday gave gruesome accounts of the slaughter and suggested that thousands have been killed. The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said that at least 30,000 people have fled across the border into Rwanda. "Those who fled may be less numerous than those who died," survivor Antoine Mpabonimana said. She said three of her children were bayoneted to death by troops who took part in the killings.
NEWS
August 24, 1988 | Associated Press
Refugees fleeing tribal violence in Burundi say that the army took part in the slaughter of thousands of people in that small, central African nation, a U.N. official said Tuesday. At least 5,000 people have been reported killed in massacres during fighting between two tribes. Code Cisse, the representative in Rwanda of the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, said that about 38,000 refugees have fled Burundi into neighboring Rwanda since the killing broke out Aug. 14.
NEWS
October 23, 1993 | From Associated Press
An estimated 30,000 refugees fearing new ethnic violence have fled Burundi since the army overthrew the government and cut communications with the outside world, the Red Cross said Friday. Several sources said the country's ousted president had been assassinated. Philippe Gaillard, head of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Rwanda, said 30,000 Hutus, the majority ethnic group in Burundi, had crossed Burundi's northern border into Rwanda.
NEWS
January 12, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Soldiers shot and killed 126 Burundian Hutu refugees who tried to break out of a holding camp in northeastern Burundi, an army spokesman said. Lt. Col. Isaie Nibizi condemned the killings in Muyinga province and said seven soldiers had been arrested in the slayings. A spokesman said the government was investigating the incident. The refugees had apparently been expelled from Tanzania for fomenting trouble in camps there.
NEWS
May 1, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
More than 1,000 Burundians fled to eastern Zaire from Burundi after a reported Hutu rebel attack, aid officials said. In neighboring Tanzania, a senior government official said that up to 40 Burundian Hutus were crossing into the East African country daily after being forced out of their country by the Tutsi-dominated army. A senior aid official reported that fighting in Burundi had taken an upward swing. U.N.
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | Associated Press
An estimated 7,000 people, some suffering from malnutrition or land-mine wounds, have fled to neighboring Zaire to escape fighting in northern Burundi, a refugee official said Saturday. The refugees are escaping clashes between extremists of the Hutu majority and the army, led by the Tutsi minority. Escalating violence in the tiny African nation since mid-December has renewed fears that Burundi might explode into ethnic massacres similar to the Rwandan genocide of 1994.
NEWS
August 28, 1995 | From Associated Press
Officials here say they may go back to expelling refugees at gunpoint if the United Nations does not get the 1.2 million people who have camped along Zaire's border for more than a year to go home soon. "We are crushed here," said Mayor Mashako Mamba Sebi, summing up the exasperation felt by Goma residents, who numbered about 200,000 before the arrival of the Rwandan and Burundian refugees. Several dozen Rwandans left Saturday on U.N.
NEWS
April 3, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "high government official" arrives in his shiny Mercedes, its smoked-glass windows sealed tight, high-decibel opera playing on the cassette deck. It may seem utterly strange to careen down the potholed streets of this inflamed city to an aria of love amid the smell of fresh leather upholstery. But people must hold themselves together even if their country tears itself apart.
NEWS
February 25, 1995 | Reuters
Thousands of Burundian and Rwandan refugees are fleeing fighting between troops and gunmen in Burundi and pouring into northwestern Tanzania, officials said Friday. The United Nations' refugee agency said 24,000 had entered Tanzania in the last week. Local government officials in Tanzania put the number at more than 30,000. Refugees reported that followers of an outlawed Hutu party were fighting a rear-guard action against the Tutsi-dominated army in northern Burundi.
NEWS
April 3, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The "high government official" arrives in his shiny Mercedes, its smoked-glass windows sealed tight, high-decibel opera playing on the cassette deck. It may seem utterly strange to careen down the potholed streets of this inflamed city to an aria of love amid the smell of fresh leather upholstery. But people must hold themselves together even if their country tears itself apart.
NEWS
October 23, 1993 | From Associated Press
An estimated 30,000 refugees fearing new ethnic violence have fled Burundi since the army overthrew the government and cut communications with the outside world, the Red Cross said Friday. Several sources said the country's ousted president had been assassinated. Philippe Gaillard, head of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Rwanda, said 30,000 Hutus, the majority ethnic group in Burundi, had crossed Burundi's northern border into Rwanda.
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