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NEWS
October 27, 1990 | JENNIFER TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress completed action Friday on legislation giving California and other states with large populations of new immigrants less than half of the $1 billion previously earmarked for 1991 assistance programs, promising to make up the difference next year. The bill, which contains funds for both immigrants and refugees, was sent to President Bush after budget-weary House members accepted changes approved late Thursday by the Senate.
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NEWS
October 27, 1990 | JENNIFER TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Congress completed action Friday on legislation giving California and other states with large populations of new immigrants less than half of the $1 billion previously earmarked for 1991 assistance programs, promising to make up the difference next year. The bill, which contains funds for both immigrants and refugees, was sent to President Bush after budget-weary House members accepted changes approved late Thursday by the Senate.
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NEWS
October 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Leaders of local Lao Family organizations in Fresno and Garden Grove have denied that their agencies are involved in "shakedowns" of ethnic Hmong refugees to fund a resistance movement in Laos.
NEWS
October 13, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Leaders of local Lao Family organizations in Fresno and Garden Grove have denied that their agencies are involved in "shakedowns" of ethnic Hmong refugees to fund a resistance movement in Laos.
NEWS
July 4, 1988
Cases of the mysterious "sudden unexpected death syndrome" among Southeast Asian refugees have declined in most areas of the United States, but not in the San Joaquin Valley. Nationwide, 117 seemingly healthy men and one woman have died without warning since the first case was reported in 1981. The cases peaked nationwide in 1982--except in the San Joaquin Valley, where many Southeast Asians have moved to be with relatives.
NEWS
October 28, 1997
Ben Reddick, 82, publisher of small California newspapers and a former Orange County supervisor. He was largely credited with coining the term "Okies" for a story he did on the immigration of Dust Bowl refugees into California in the 1930s. Reddick, who made up the word from the "OK" on the license plates on Oklahomans' cars, was named an "Honorary Okie" by the Oklahoma governor in 1968.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1986 | THOMAS OMESTAD, Times Staff Writer
A student congregation at California Lutheran University in Thousand Oaks has voted to support the movement of sanctuary for Central American refugees, it was announced Tuesday. The group hopes to encourage churches in the Conejo Valley to establish safe havens for those fleeing political persecution. However, the student congregation will not physically shelter Central American refugees, as have several Roman Catholic churches around Los Angeles and the nation.
NEWS
October 28, 1997 | From Associated Press
Newspaper publisher Ben Reddick, the man generally credited with coining the term "Okie," is dead at the age of 82. Reddick, who owned newspapers in Newport Beach and served briefly on the Orange County Board of Supervisors, died Thursday in his sleep at a convalescent home in Templeton, his family said. Reddick started his newspaper career in 1929, when he worked for the Huntington Park Daily Signal. He then moved to the Long Beach Press-Telegram and the Los Angeles Examiner.
NATIONAL
July 29, 2009 | Anna Gorman
The federal government routinely failed to follow its own standards regulating immigration detention centers across the country, denying detainees sufficient recreation time and adequate access to attorneys, legal materials and telephones, according to a new report issued Tuesday. As a result of the widespread violations, hundreds of thousands of detainees faced tremendous challenges in making their case to stay in the U.S.
NEWS
June 18, 1989 | RICHARD BEENE, Times Staff Writer
Unable to persuade Hong Kong, Thailand and other "first asylum" countries to change their policies on Vietnamese refugees, Southern California Vietnamese leaders said Saturday that they will focus new attention on establishing regional holding centers to prevent people from being sent back to Vietnam against their will. Returning from the International Conference on Indochinese Refugees in Geneva, the local delegates representing Orange County's estimated 100,000 Vietnamese said the fate of tens of thousands of refugees holed up in camps throughout Southeast Asia remains uncertain because most of the countries housing the refugees have refused to reject the policy of forced repatriation.
NEWS
July 4, 1988
Cases of the mysterious "sudden unexpected death syndrome" among Southeast Asian refugees have declined in most areas of the United States, but not in the San Joaquin Valley. Nationwide, 117 seemingly healthy men and one woman have died without warning since the first case was reported in 1981. The cases peaked nationwide in 1982--except in the San Joaquin Valley, where many Southeast Asians have moved to be with relatives.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, Mark Chalon Smith is a free-lancer who regularly contributes to The Times Orange County Edition.
To understand the art, it always helps to understand the artist--and it's crucial when trying to comprehend Hmong quilts, the highly personal yet symbolic folk art of these Laotian people. The Hmong--who don't have a written language--use handmade quilts to depict events and activities. In peaceful times, a quilt, usually in the form of a "memory cloth," could be a keepsake to commemorate a marriage, birth or other important occurrence.
NEWS
October 19, 1992 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Sen. John Seymour, in shirt sleeves and standing before a darkened prison, looks squarely into the television camera. "I say: Deport them!" he proclaims in the 30-second commercial. "Let them serve their time in the country where they came from." The ad is one of several that the Republican candidate is using in his underdog battle with Democrat Dianne Feinstein for one of California's two U.S.
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