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Refugees Central America

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NEWS
January 15, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday declined to recognize a constitutional right to own machine guns sought by the National Rifle Assn., which had described a lower court's ruling in the matter as "the first ban on firearms possession by law-abiding citizens in American history." Without dissent, the high court let stand an appeals court ruling which upheld a 1986 federal law banning the manufacture, sale or ownership of new machine guns except by police or government agencies.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2000 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A sense of disappointment and betrayal swept through Southern California's Central American community on Friday in response to Congress' rejection of a proposal to grant immigration relief to hundreds of thousands of El Salvadorans, Guatemalans and Hondurans. "We're extremely disappointed and even angry," said Angela Sanbrano, executive director of the Central American Resource Center in Los Angeles. "It's too bad that politics was put before justice."
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NEWS
January 14, 1989 | Associated Press
President-elect Bush said Friday that he would take "a hard new look" at U.S. immigration policies, but he blamed the influx of refugees from Central America on what he called tyranny in leftist-run Nicaragua. Bush, asked at a brief news conference what he planned to do about the flood of refugees into the Miami area, said that the flow of refugees into Florida and his home state of Texas "is causing an overburdening of facilities like schools and hospitals.
NEWS
February 10, 1999 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pedro Vanegas Lopez, a 33-year-old Honduran refugee fleeing the devastation of Hurricane Mitch, knew his journey to the United States would be a perilous one. He expected to confront thieves along the way, to haggle over bribes with Mexican policemen, to walk for many days and to sleep under the stars. It was what he encountered as he crossed the Mexican-Guatemalan border that caught him completely by surprise.
NEWS
January 11, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
They came by the hundreds, reeking of days without washing, their faces showing the misery of sleeping in open fields. They stood in line Tuesday, each one clutching a small packet of papers, waiting a turn before the immigration authorities and, with luck, a chance to leave what had become their prison without bars. These were the refugees from Central America--Nicaragua mostly--and what they wanted from the U.S.
NEWS
January 10, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of Central American refugees, many of them living for weeks in a South Texas shantytown, were granted the right to leave Monday after a federal judge ordered the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to stop refusing them permission to travel while their asylum applications are being reviewed. The action, a temporary restraining order issued by U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1989 | KEVIN ALLMAN
Like some Oscar ceremonies of years past, some Oscar parties have more glitches than glitz. Take Wednesday night's second annual Oscar-watching party and fund-raiser held by El Rescate, a support group for Central American refugees in the Los Angeles area. The 1988 El Rescate party at the Mondrian Hotel attracted a large crop of young actors, but this year's version, held at the newly reopened discotheque Vertigo in downtown Los Angeles, attracted fewer celebrities and more logistical problems.
NEWS
January 5, 1989 | Associated Press
A United Nations refugee expert visiting the southern tip of Texas said Wednesday she had seen hundreds of Central American emigrants camping in makeshift tents and crowded into dilapidated motels. "Clearly these people are experiencing difficulty and hardship, and this is one thing I wanted to come down and see about," said Susan Timberlake of the Washington, D.C., office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1998 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They began gathering early Wednesday at the Pico-Union office of El Rescate, a social service group in the heart of Southern California's Central American immigrant community. Everybody had the same question, repeated by Ana Delgado of Long Beach: "Do we have to apply now under the new law?" Thousands of Salvadoran and Guatemalan immigrants must file papers with immigration courts by Friday or lose their chance to stay permanently in the United States.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 1998 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They began gathering early Wednesday at the Pico-Union office of El Rescate, a social service group in the heart of Southern California's Central American immigrant community. Everybody had the same question, repeated by Ana Delgado of Long Beach: "Do we have to apply now under the new law?" Thousands of Salvadoran and Guatemalan immigrants must file papers with immigration courts by Friday or lose their chance to stay permanently in the United States.
NEWS
May 9, 1997 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meeting with the leaders of Central American countries Thursday, President Clinton addressed their concerns over a new U.S. immigration law, pledging to delay enforcement of the provision that most worries them and to press Congress to soften the impact on their nationals living in the United States.
NEWS
August 13, 1993 | PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Concluding a bitter, five-year court battle pitting asylum-seekers against U.S. immigration authorities, a federal judge Thursday approved a settlement that guarantees additional safeguards to thousands of foreign nationals filing for political asylum in the Los Angeles area.
NEWS
May 11, 1992 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ten years ago, Carmen Martinez and her husband, Ricardo, sold their belongings in El Salvador, left the civil war behind and joined the exodus northward. They built a new life in the Los Angeles neighborhood known as Pico-Union, crowding with four children into a one-room apartment, gradually purchasing furniture on credit and saving money to one day buy a home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A continuing migration of refugees to the United States and a critical staffing shortage within the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service has created an unprecedented backlog of political asylum cases, particularly in Los Angeles where the problem has reached record levels. According to INS estimates, the number of pending asylum cases has grown from 72,000 to more than 204,000 in the last 2 1/2 years.
NEWS
January 23, 1992 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a ruling that will affect thousands of refugees from strife-torn Central America, the Supreme Court said Wednesday that those who fled to the United States to avoid forced military service are not entitled to political asylum. In a 6-3 ruling, the high court said that people pressured to join either a regular army or guerrilla bands are not necessarily being "persecuted on account of . . . a political opinion," as required for asylum under the Refugee Act of 1980.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hundreds of Central Americans have been released from a Port Isabel, Tex., detention center in the last week, refugee advocates said. One former inmate said that refugees were told they could leave the camp if they had relatives with whom they could stay and if they promised to report to Immigration and Naturalization Service offices at their destinations. There are now about 1,100 refugees at the center.
NEWS
June 19, 1988 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
The Hernandez brothers, Manuel and Juan Antonio, left El Salvador a month ago with the idea of finding work in Los Angeles. After crossing two international borders, after being relieved of all their belongings at gunpoint by a thief in Mexico and after a harrowing two-week trip, penniless, on freight trains headed north, they arrived at the border safely. Now they are contemplating their next hurdle: negotiating the U.S.-Mexico border.
NEWS
January 15, 1991 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court on Monday declined to recognize a constitutional right to own machine guns sought by the National Rifle Assn., which had described a lower court's ruling in the matter as "the first ban on firearms possession by law-abiding citizens in American history." Without dissent, the high court let stand an appeals court ruling which upheld a 1986 federal law banning the manufacture, sale or ownership of new machine guns except by police or government agencies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1991 | GEORGE RAMOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move likely to draw the ire of Salvadoran activists, officials at Los Angeles' oldest church have decided to stop housing Central American refugees and other homeless people overnight--ending a key element of the controversial declaration of sanctuary at the downtown Roman Catholic parish.
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