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Refugees Colombia

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NEWS
July 28, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five months of nights tossing on the concrete floor of a brightly lighted auditorium and days playing in a makeshift refugee camp's mud and open sewers left Alejandro Perez's 2-year-old daughter shaking with fever. Desperate for money to take her to a big-city hospital, Perez defied Colombia's brutal private militias. Last month, he and his 16-year-old nephew returned to his farm near the Panama border to harvest timber.
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NEWS
October 12, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a city that over decades has taken in tens of thousands of desperate refugees, they seem the least likely. Fleeing a democracy, they arrive by commercial jet, with tourist visas. They are educated and have a little money. But they are running for their lives. "We left two days after getting this," said Maria Ochoa, unfolding a one-page, typewritten letter that she, her husband and their two teenage daughters brought with them from Colombia.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1989 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For much of his life, Alvaro Villa has borne his Colombian identity like a badge of prestige--with honor and with pride. But nowadays, it is often a sore topic. "I have always been proud to say I was Colombian," said Villa, a robotics salesman from Valencia. "But lately, I have not been telling many people. . . . When they find out, they think you are a part of the (drug-dealing) cartels, and I'm not. They think all Colombians are drug dealers and criminals--and we aren't."
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | From Reuters
Thousands of Colombians continued to pour out of this provincial capital Sunday, hoping to leave behind the destruction and violence caused by last week's deadly earthquake. The ground continued to shake Sunday as aftershocks rattled already frayed nerves. Three moderate aftershocks hit the west-central coffee-growing region, the largest a magnitude 3.5, but no additional damage was reported, Dario Llanos of the National Geological Institute said.
NEWS
October 12, 1999 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a city that over decades has taken in tens of thousands of desperate refugees, they seem the least likely. Fleeing a democracy, they arrive by commercial jet, with tourist visas. They are educated and have a little money. But they are running for their lives. "We left two days after getting this," said Maria Ochoa, unfolding a one-page, typewritten letter that she, her husband and their two teenage daughters brought with them from Colombia.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | From Reuters
Thousands of Colombians continued to pour out of this provincial capital Sunday, hoping to leave behind the destruction and violence caused by last week's deadly earthquake. The ground continued to shake Sunday as aftershocks rattled already frayed nerves. Three moderate aftershocks hit the west-central coffee-growing region, the largest a magnitude 3.5, but no additional damage was reported, Dario Llanos of the National Geological Institute said.
NEWS
October 10, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
The soldiers came to Olga Behar's apartment in late 1985, shortly after she published an uncompromising book, now in its 11th edition, on the four decades of political violence that had racked her native Colombia. Behar, a television and newspaper reporter who has won Colombia's equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize, was away at the time but the search of her home--purportedly for weapons--crystallized her free-floating suspicion and distrust into rock-hard fear.
WORLD
September 27, 2005 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
A request for political asylum by Ecuador's former leader has put Colombian President Alvaro Uribe in an awkward position as he tries to mend deteriorating relations with his southern neighbor. Colombia has not decided whether to grant asylum to former President Lucio Gutierrez, who arrived unexpectedly in Bogota, the Colombian capital, last week.
WORLD
January 4, 2006 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Armando Garces was reluctant to leave his mountain village even after right-wing militia members had gone door to door telling residents they had 48 hours to evacuate, or else. He didn't like being ordered to abandon the only home he had ever known. Then a daylong gun battle erupted between the paramilitary fighters and leftist guerrillas over control of nearby coca crops and transit routes.
NEWS
July 28, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five months of nights tossing on the concrete floor of a brightly lighted auditorium and days playing in a makeshift refugee camp's mud and open sewers left Alejandro Perez's 2-year-old daughter shaking with fever. Desperate for money to take her to a big-city hospital, Perez defied Colombia's brutal private militias. Last month, he and his 16-year-old nephew returned to his farm near the Panama border to harvest timber.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1989 | DARRELL DAWSEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For much of his life, Alvaro Villa has borne his Colombian identity like a badge of prestige--with honor and with pride. But nowadays, it is often a sore topic. "I have always been proud to say I was Colombian," said Villa, a robotics salesman from Valencia. "But lately, I have not been telling many people. . . . When they find out, they think you are a part of the (drug-dealing) cartels, and I'm not. They think all Colombians are drug dealers and criminals--and we aren't."
NEWS
October 10, 1989 | GARRY ABRAMS, Times Staff Writer
The soldiers came to Olga Behar's apartment in late 1985, shortly after she published an uncompromising book, now in its 11th edition, on the four decades of political violence that had racked her native Colombia. Behar, a television and newspaper reporter who has won Colombia's equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize, was away at the time but the search of her home--purportedly for weapons--crystallized her free-floating suspicion and distrust into rock-hard fear.
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