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Refugees Czechoslovakia

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NEWS
December 1, 1989 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jaroslav Hutka just didn't fit in after the Prague Spring. Not that he was a political dissident, at least not at first. But the songs he wrote and sang were a bit unorthodox. And with his long hair and beard, he was different from the humorless men who took power in Czechoslovakia after the reform movement of 1968 was crushed. "It was clear to them that I was not one of them," he said Thursday over the kind of lunch that only a few weeks ago he thought he would never have again.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Magicians often create the illusion of defying death in elaborate escapes, but Petrick and Mia Krejcik were ready to lay down their lives for the one they pulled off in 1979. In their greatest feat to date, the husband-wife team managed to extricate themselves from their native Czechoslovakia, then still under Communist rule, with the help of a little sleight of hand and a lot of nerve.
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NEWS
November 3, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A growing proportion of East European refugees coming to the United States will be from countries other than Poland and Hungary under a new policy based on the danger of persecution, Bush Administration officials said. Officials told a House subcommittee that the governments of Poland and Hungary are growing more liberal--so that the danger of persecution there is receding--but that is not true in Czechoslovakia and Romania.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When they were young girls, Petra and Sasha passed notes and candy back and forth in a basket on a string from their balconies, one above the other, in the apartment building on People's Militia Square in Prague. Then came the Prague Spring of 1968--and the Soviet invasion. With Russian tanks rolling into the city, Petra, then 12, fled with her family across the Czech border into Austria, and then into Switzerland, where they settled.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When they were young girls, Petra and Sasha passed notes and candy back and forth in a basket on a string from their balconies, one above the other, in the apartment building on People's Militia Square in Prague. Then came the Prague Spring of 1968--and the Soviet invasion. With Russian tanks rolling into the city, Petra, then 12, fled with her family across the Czech border into Austria, and then into Switzerland, where they settled.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
As concern mounted Friday over the fate of nearly 3,000 East Germans who have taken refuge in the West German Embassy in Prague, West German officials appealed to the Czechoslovak government to provide living quarters "befitting human beings" for the refugees. At the same time, Czechoslovak authorities were said to be debating whether to provide facilities outside the embassy compound for the growing number of East Germans trying to flee to the West.
NEWS
September 19, 1989 | From Reuters
A 39-year-old Czechoslovak escaped to West Germany on Monday by flying a motorized hang-glider over the border, police said. After an hourlong journey, he landed safely near the town of Furth im Wald in the southern state of Bavaria, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 15, 1993 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Magicians often create the illusion of defying death in elaborate escapes, but Petrick and Mia Krejcik were ready to lay down their lives for the one they pulled off in 1979. In their greatest feat to date, the husband-wife team managed to extricate themselves from their native Czechoslovakia, then still under Communist rule, with the help of a little sleight of hand and a lot of nerve.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | DAN FISHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Jaroslav Hutka just didn't fit in after the Prague Spring. Not that he was a political dissident, at least not at first. But the songs he wrote and sang were a bit unorthodox. And with his long hair and beard, he was different from the humorless men who took power in Czechoslovakia after the reform movement of 1968 was crushed. "It was clear to them that I was not one of them," he said Thursday over the kind of lunch that only a few weeks ago he thought he would never have again.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A growing proportion of East European refugees coming to the United States will be from countries other than Poland and Hungary under a new policy based on the danger of persecution, Bush Administration officials said. Officials told a House subcommittee that the governments of Poland and Hungary are growing more liberal--so that the danger of persecution there is receding--but that is not true in Czechoslovakia and Romania.
NEWS
September 30, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
As concern mounted Friday over the fate of nearly 3,000 East Germans who have taken refuge in the West German Embassy in Prague, West German officials appealed to the Czechoslovak government to provide living quarters "befitting human beings" for the refugees. At the same time, Czechoslovak authorities were said to be debating whether to provide facilities outside the embassy compound for the growing number of East Germans trying to flee to the West.
NEWS
September 19, 1989 | From Reuters
A 39-year-old Czechoslovak escaped to West Germany on Monday by flying a motorized hang-glider over the border, police said. After an hourlong journey, he landed safely near the town of Furth im Wald in the southern state of Bavaria, police said.
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