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Refugees East Germany

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NEWS
October 17, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The biggest demonstration in East Germany in decades took place Monday night in the southern city of Leipzig as at least 100,000 opposition activists surged through the streets after peace services in five Protestant churches. They crowded into Karl Marx Square in the center of East Germany's second-largest city as part of a mass effort to urge the hard-line Communist regime to introduce political and economic reforms. "We are the people" and "Give young people power," they chanted.
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NEWS
June 30, 1990 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
East German prosecutors placed ousted Communist leader Erich Honecker under investigation for murder Friday in the deaths of hundreds of East Germans killed trying to escape across the heavily fortified border during his 13-year regime. Border guards also could face charges for carrying out Honecker's orders, according to a statement issued by chief prosecutor Guenter Seidel.
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NEWS
November 6, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Facing an open route to the West, thousands of East Germans poured across a sliver of Czechoslovakia into West Germany on Sunday. At the rate of between 100 and 200 an hour, the latest wave of refugees from their Communist government took cars, buses and trains in their trek to the West, causing traffic on the Czechoslovak side of the West German border to back up for miles.
NEWS
March 21, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The West German government announced Tuesday that, in hopes of discouraging would-be immigrants, it will crack down on benefits extended to East Germans moving to the federal republic. Most of the benefits will be withdrawn July 1, the government said. But Bonn officials added that the government expects the weak East German ostmark to be replaced by the West German deutschemark this summer--under terms favorable for millions of East Germans now worried about the future value of their savings.
NEWS
November 10, 1989 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush on Thursday hailed the opening of East Germany's borders as a "liberation," but he urged East Germans to resist the pull of the West and remain at home to reform their country. The announcement from East Berlin caught Bush Administration officials by surprise, sending shock waves through the White House and the government's foreign policy Establishment and leading some U.S. officials to worry that the changes that have rocked East Germany are coming too fast.
NEWS
August 31, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
A senior East German official Wednesday ruled out any economic or political reforms that the West German government contends could halt the flow of refugees from the Communist state. The statement by Kurt Tiedke in the Communist Party newspaper, Neues Deutschland, came amid reports circulating in Bonn that 77-year-old East German leader Erich Honecker is critically ill.
NEWS
August 21, 1989
Several hundred East Germans arrived at crowded West German refugee camps, a day after they fled across the Austro-Hungarian border. West German government officials said that about 500 East Germans had come by chartered trains and buses from Vienna to the main transit camp in Giessen north of Frankfurt and to another camp near Nuremberg.
NEWS
August 26, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
The stream of people fleeing East Germany, along with the underlying causes of the exodus, reflects a growing crisis in this hard-line Communist state, Western officials and diplomats agreed Friday. "The situation has definitely reached a crisis," one Western envoy said. "There is a complete lack of trust between the government and the governed. Large numbers of East Germans want to escape, and the authorities don't know what to do about it.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
West Germany closed the doors of its diplomatic mission in East Berlin on Tuesday in an effort to deal with about 130 East Germans who have crowded in, hoping to get emigration documents. The East Germans have refused to leave the five-story building and are sleeping on mattresses on the floor.
NEWS
November 8, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented move, the Communist government of East Germany resigned Tuesday afternoon amid the deepening crisis over citizen demands for reform. A brief official announcement said that Prime Minister Willi Stoph and the entire Council of Ministers have stepped down in order to let the Volkskammer, or Parliament, select a new government. It said they will stay on in a caretaker capacity until the new government is formed, but it did not say when that might be.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to discourage the flood of East German refugees, the West German government set up a committee Tuesday to consider reducing welfare benefits extended to newcomers. Spokesman Hans Klein told reporters after a meeting of the governing coalition that the committee will "deal with the consequences for social policy of the dramatic changes in East Germany."
NEWS
December 18, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For some East German children, this Christmas will be a lonely one: They have been abandoned by parents who have left for the West. East Germany has always made a point of celebrating the holiday season with brightly decorated markets--trees, lights, toys, rides--to lift the flagging spirits of those living in the Communist state. This year is no exception. But a special effort to surround a group of youngsters with Christmas cheer is being made at the Dr.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He slumped in a plastic chair in the TV room, drinking yet another beer, smoking yet another cigarette. Nothing much to do, and nowhere to go. The locked gates and sour guards saw to that. The man's bleary eyes darted about, and his words poured forth in a staccato burst: "I'm Andreas," he announced. "Age 38. Unmarried. Born and raised in Glauchau, East Germany. I left in January, 1985. "And now I'm back."
NEWS
November 25, 1989 | From United Press International
East German secret agents posing as refugees have infiltrated West Germany in recent weeks, taking cover in the massive influx of East Germans to the West, a West German magazine reported. A West German federal court on Nov. 15 charged one East German national with espionage after his arrival in West Germany via Czechoslovakia, the magazine Bunte said.
NEWS
November 18, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many East Germans who have fled recently to West Germany have changed their minds and want to return home, officials said Friday. But, "many who wish to go home first want to find out what kind of welcome will await them," a Red Cross official cautioned. "They also want to find out what happened to their jobs and apartments." The West German Red Cross is in contact with its East German counterpart to discuss ways to help those refugees who want to go home, another Red Cross official said.
NEWS
November 15, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The newly elected East German prime minister, Hans Modrow, opened talks with non-Communist Party leaders Tuesday in an effort to form what he called a "genuine coalition government." He and Communist leader Egon Krenz conferred with the heads of four small parties that have suddenly displayed independence after years of serving as Communist Party satellites.
NEWS
October 4, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
About 11,000 East Germans, in hurried flight from their homeland, were set Tuesday night to board trains for a new life in West Germany. But the special trains, to come from East Germany, did not arrive in Prague, and the crowds faced another night in the streets and encamped in the muddy backyard of the West German Embassy here.
NEWS
November 14, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two months after the East Germans first discovered a hole in the Iron Curtain and began pouring into the West via Hungary and Czechoslovakia, the mayor of this North Sea port declared his city so filled with refugees, it could take no more. That was last week. When East Germany threw open its borders last Friday, Bremen's mayor, Henning Scherf, announced plans to house future refugees in a massive shelter under the city center known locally as "The Bunker" and built for a nuclear catastrophe.
NEWS
November 12, 1989 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An estimated three quarters of a million EastGermans swarmed into the West on Saturday on the second day of their new-found freedom, but to the growing relief of both East and West German authorities, the majority were on their way home by the end of the day. East German officials issued the startling news Saturday that fully 1.6 million East Germans--one-tenth of the entire population--had been issued travel visas since the border opening announcement Thursday.
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