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Refugees Eastern Europe

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1994 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Ahmet Hadzimujagic and his wife, Aida, led a charmed existence. He was a successful architect. She was a doctor. They owned a bed and breakfast in Srebrenica, then a popular resort town famous for its mineral springs.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1994 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina, Ahmet Hadzimujagic and his wife, Aida, led a charmed existence. He was a successful architect. She was a doctor. They owned a bed and breakfast in Srebrenica, then a popular resort town famous for its mineral springs.
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NEWS
November 3, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A growing proportion of East European refugees coming to the United States will be from countries other than Poland and Hungary under a new policy based on the danger of persecution, Bush Administration officials said. Officials told a House subcommittee that the governments of Poland and Hungary are growing more liberal--so that the danger of persecution there is receding--but that is not true in Czechoslovakia and Romania.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California emigres from the Soviet Union, China and Eastern Europe, each with his own political agenda, have begun to work on a common goal, protesting the emergency government in Moscow. Only a few days ago, the prospect of a demonstration in support of ousted Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev would have been highly unlikely, organizers said.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soldiers slung with automatic rifles and night-vision glasses stand watch over frozen vineyards. The skeletal vines, trussed into gnarled bundles, rock noiselessly in the wind of a moonlit night. A rustle in the frosty underbrush draws a beam of light, illuminating three sets of startled eyes. A flash of fear and tension grips the watchers but quickly eases into a nervous laugh. This time, the eerie stillness has been disturbed by wild hares.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West Germany cannot afford to take in hundreds of thousands fleeing poverty in Eastern Europe and the Third World, a top official in Chancellor Helmut Kohl's government said Tuesday in a plea for help in stemming the refugee tide. As many as half of the 400,000 refugees expected in Western Europe this year are likely to settle in West Germany, aggravating social tensions already strained by the costs of German reunification, Interior Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said.
NEWS
November 26, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a few dollars begged from an old acquaintance and a half-baked plan for reaching the West, Ilona Petrescu huddled with her two children on a sooty platform of Keleti station to await the late-night train to southern Hungary. Keleti, a catch basin for East European drifters, had been her home off and on for months. But spurred on by Budapest's waning hospitality for foreign homeless and fear of deportation back to Romania, Petrescu and her family had decided to change course. "My son is ill.
NEWS
August 21, 1991 | MATHIS CHAZANOV, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southern California emigres from the Soviet Union, China and Eastern Europe, each with his own political agenda, have begun to work on a common goal, protesting the emergency government in Moscow. Only a few days ago, the prospect of a demonstration in support of ousted Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev would have been highly unlikely, organizers said.
OPINION
September 24, 1989
Following your excellent coverage of the events taking place in Eastern Europe, especially the escape of the hundreds or thousands of young East Germans from Hungary to the West, I am reliving the moments of joy and euphoria that I felt when I escaped from Hungary to Austria with my brother during the night of Nov. 24, 1956. It is an indescribable feeling that can only be compared to giving birth to a child. I am very proud of Hungary and would like to thank Austria for helping the refugees of Eastern Europe all these years.
NEWS
January 4, 1989 | From Deutsche Presse-Agentur
More than 200,000 ethnic German refugees from Eastern Europe came to West Germany last year, the highest number since the formation of the country in 1949, an Interior Ministry spokesman said Tuesday. A total of the 202,673 ethnic refugees were handled by transit camps and granted German citizenship. The majority of 140,226 were from Poland, with 47,572 from the Soviet Union, said Horst Waffenschmidt, parliamentary state secretary at the Foreign Ministry.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soldiers slung with automatic rifles and night-vision glasses stand watch over frozen vineyards. The skeletal vines, trussed into gnarled bundles, rock noiselessly in the wind of a moonlit night. A rustle in the frosty underbrush draws a beam of light, illuminating three sets of startled eyes. A flash of fear and tension grips the watchers but quickly eases into a nervous laugh. This time, the eerie stillness has been disturbed by wild hares.
NEWS
November 26, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a few dollars begged from an old acquaintance and a half-baked plan for reaching the West, Ilona Petrescu huddled with her two children on a sooty platform of Keleti station to await the late-night train to southern Hungary. Keleti, a catch basin for East European drifters, had been her home off and on for months. But spurred on by Budapest's waning hospitality for foreign homeless and fear of deportation back to Romania, Petrescu and her family had decided to change course. "My son is ill.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
West Germany cannot afford to take in hundreds of thousands fleeing poverty in Eastern Europe and the Third World, a top official in Chancellor Helmut Kohl's government said Tuesday in a plea for help in stemming the refugee tide. As many as half of the 400,000 refugees expected in Western Europe this year are likely to settle in West Germany, aggravating social tensions already strained by the costs of German reunification, Interior Minister Wolfgang Schaeuble said.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A growing proportion of East European refugees coming to the United States will be from countries other than Poland and Hungary under a new policy based on the danger of persecution, Bush Administration officials said. Officials told a House subcommittee that the governments of Poland and Hungary are growing more liberal--so that the danger of persecution there is receding--but that is not true in Czechoslovakia and Romania.
NEWS
December 30, 1990 | Reuters
Eight people, four of them children, died when fire swept a home for ethnic German refugees from Eastern Europe in Bremen on Friday night, police said. A police spokesman in the north German city said the cause of the blaze was not yet known, but there was no evidence of arson. Five people were being treated in a hospital, one in a serious condition. Police said the second floor of the building, whose 240 inhabitants included former East Germans, was gutted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1986 | From United Press International
While Chinese tennis stars and East Bloc sailors have been granted political asylum almost immediately, the majority of refugees fleeing civil war and death-squad killings in El Salvador are refused, a lawyer testified Wednesday. New York attorney Arthur Helton testified before U.S. District Judge David Kenyon in Los Angeles in the trial of a national class-action lawsuit requesting that immigration officials tell illegal Salvadoran aliens of their right to seek asylum.
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