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NEWS
July 2, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of a broad tightening of immigration controls throughout Western Europe, Germany began turning back potential refugees at its frontiers Thursday for the first time since World War II. Throughout the day, television newscasts showed guards on the German-Czech border stopping foreign-looking travelers, loading them into vans and driving them back to the Czech side.
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NEWS
July 2, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As part of a broad tightening of immigration controls throughout Western Europe, Germany began turning back potential refugees at its frontiers Thursday for the first time since World War II. Throughout the day, television newscasts showed guards on the German-Czech border stopping foreign-looking travelers, loading them into vans and driving them back to the Czech side.
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NEWS
January 17, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to discourage the flood of East German refugees, the West German government set up a committee Tuesday to consider reducing welfare benefits extended to newcomers. Spokesman Hans Klein told reporters after a meeting of the governing coalition that the committee will "deal with the consequences for social policy of the dramatic changes in East Germany."
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to discourage the flood of East German refugees, the West German government set up a committee Tuesday to consider reducing welfare benefits extended to newcomers. Spokesman Hans Klein told reporters after a meeting of the governing coalition that the committee will "deal with the consequences for social policy of the dramatic changes in East Germany."
NEWS
January 7, 1987 | United Press International
Moscow allowed only 944 Soviet Jews to emigrate in 1986--the second-lowest annual total on record, refugee agencies said today. Last year's figure was just 22 higher than the all-time low of 922 recorded in 1984 by the Intergovernmental Commission for Migration. The commission, established after World War II to assist refugees in Europe, began helping Soviet Jewish emigrants in 1971 when there were 12,680 arrivals at its resettlement center in Vienna.
TRAVEL
December 29, 1996
The article mentioning the Silver Dollar Saloon in Leadville, Colo. ("Aspen: Inside and Out," Dec. 8) brought back memories when I was a private first class with the 10th Mountain Division ("ski troops") at Camp Hale. About half of the ski troopers were immigrants or refugees from Europe, where skiing had been popular for a long time. Once a month, a federal judge came up from Denver to naturalize us at the Silver Dollar, some miles away from Camp Hale. After the final paperwork had been done, the judge called a recess for lunch but warned that he would not swear us in as citizens if we came back drunk like the group of Norwegians the day before.
OPINION
August 4, 2002
Re "Blast Kills 7 at University in Jerusalem," Aug. 1: The stark contrast between the Palestinian joy at the slaughter of students at Hebrew University and the investigation of the Israeli government about the "innocent lives" lost due to errant intelligence in the targeting of a Hamas mega-murderer is amazing. These two opposites say volumes about the moral base of today's Islam. Reciting the mantra of the Palestinian Authority that everything terrorists do is because of "the occupation" just adds one more proof that the teachings of hate from infancy have borne bitter fruit indeed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1993
Services will be held today for Ruth M. Kahn, an active member of the local Jewish community who dedicated her life to serving others. A Newport Beach resident, Kahn was 87 when she died July 20 of natural causes at Kaiser Permanente Hospital in Norwalk. Her interest in nutrition began early.
WORLD
April 19, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams, Los Angeles Times
A massive Russian crackdown on Chechnya's bid for independence in the 1990s and the installation of loyal leaders there pushed the Caucasus Muslim enclave from the headlines years ago. But resentment has festered and at times bled into the global holy war being waged by Islamic militants. It appears unlikely that oppression of Chechnya's Muslim majority instigated the attack on the Boston Marathon, in which two Chechen emigre brothers are suspects. The two were young when they arrived in the United States and weren't known to associate with militants.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2007 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
A federal immigration judge has ordered the removal of a retired Wisconsin sausage maker who slipped into this country half a century ago by hiding his past as a Nazi prison camp guard, authorities said Thursday. Josias Kumpf was the 100th former Nazi in the U.S. to be prosecuted by the Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations.
OPINION
August 10, 2002
It's nice to see that Steven L. Spiegel (Opinion, Aug. 4) has picked up the ball that the Bush administration dropped months ago regarding the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The need for "an American-led, multinational delegation on the ground" to resolve issues there seems all too obvious, given that we donate billions of dollars to Israel each year and should at least show concern about a state that has spiraled out of control. The media should have been asking President Bush, "What are you planning to do about the situation there?"
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