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NEWS
January 14, 1989 | United Press International
State officials Friday urged the federal government to assume financial responsibility for the continuing flood of Nicaraguan refugees into South Florida. About 5,000 refugees--mostly from El Salvador, Nicaragua and Guatemala--are expected to travel to South Florida from South Texas after a court ruling that allows them to travel within the United States. Refugees by the hundreds began arriving at Miami bus stations this week.
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NEWS
January 27, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Council of Churches, which has plunged into the middle of the Elian Gonzalez case, is a controversial organization that often has espoused liberal causes. Critics accuse it of having been too cozy with Marxist governments abroad.
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NEWS
January 15, 1989
Florida lawmakers met with hundreds of Nicaraguan immigrants living at a stadium in Miami to pledge support, but they warned that funds to help them find jobs and homes "don't come easily." Newly elected Republicans Sen. Connie Mack and Rep. E. Clay Shaw Jr. and Mayor Xavier Suarez visited the Bobby Maduro Miami Stadium to examine the problems facing the growing number of Nicaraguan arrivals. A total of 263 Nicaraguans are living at the stadium.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tensions have mounted among hundreds of refugees being held in a huge Florida detention camp in the aftermath of the U.S. decision that all Haitian boat people stopped at sea would be returned to their homeland without being given an asylum hearing.
NEWS
January 27, 2000 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The National Council of Churches, which has plunged into the middle of the Elian Gonzalez case, is a controversial organization that often has espoused liberal causes. Critics accuse it of having been too cozy with Marxist governments abroad.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | BARRY BEARAK and MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
There are more than 150,000 Nicaraguan exiles in Miami, and, for the past few months, most have insisted that the election in their homeland would result in nothing but a Sandinista fraud and a victory for Daniel Ortega. But Monday, with the votes finally in and President Ortega on his way out, the exile community was a pinwheel of emotions that alternated joy, disbelief and a measure of anxiety about their individual futures.
NEWS
June 6, 1992 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tensions have mounted among hundreds of refugees being held in a huge Florida detention camp in the aftermath of the U.S. decision that all Haitian boat people stopped at sea would be returned to their homeland without being given an asylum hearing.
NEWS
February 21, 1994 | Associated Press
A boat carrying 20 to 40 would-be Haitian refugees to Florida capsized in shark-infested waters off the Bahamas on Sunday. At least five people died, authorities said. Only three people were known to have reached the safety of a beach off Green Turtle Cay, northeast of Great Abaco Island, said duty officer Rhonda Whaton of the Bahamas Air-Sea Rescue. "It's very gruesome," she said. "Unfortunately, there are sharks very active in the area."
NEWS
December 2, 1997 | From Associated Press
Little tested and little trusted, U.N.-trained Haitian police assumed responsibility for the safety of Haiti's wary people Monday at the end of a 3-year-old U.N. peacekeeping mission. The U.N. mission to restore order to Haiti ended at midnight Sunday, handing most of its duties over to civilian Haitian National Police--a 6,000-strong force assembled from scratch that has yet to win the public's confidence.
NEWS
January 14, 1989 | Associated Press
President-elect Bush said Friday that he would take "a hard new look" at U.S. immigration policies, but he blamed the influx of refugees from Central America on what he called tyranny in leftist-run Nicaragua. Bush, asked at a brief news conference what he planned to do about the flood of refugees into the Miami area, said that the flow of refugees into Florida and his home state of Texas "is causing an overburdening of facilities like schools and hospitals.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | BARRY BEARAK and MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
There are more than 150,000 Nicaraguan exiles in Miami, and, for the past few months, most have insisted that the election in their homeland would result in nothing but a Sandinista fraud and a victory for Daniel Ortega. But Monday, with the votes finally in and President Ortega on his way out, the exile community was a pinwheel of emotions that alternated joy, disbelief and a measure of anxiety about their individual futures.
NEWS
January 15, 1989
Florida lawmakers met with hundreds of Nicaraguan immigrants living at a stadium in Miami to pledge support, but they warned that funds to help them find jobs and homes "don't come easily." Newly elected Republicans Sen. Connie Mack and Rep. E. Clay Shaw Jr. and Mayor Xavier Suarez visited the Bobby Maduro Miami Stadium to examine the problems facing the growing number of Nicaraguan arrivals. A total of 263 Nicaraguans are living at the stadium.
NEWS
January 14, 1989 | United Press International
State officials Friday urged the federal government to assume financial responsibility for the continuing flood of Nicaraguan refugees into South Florida. About 5,000 refugees--mostly from El Salvador, Nicaragua and Guatemala--are expected to travel to South Florida from South Texas after a court ruling that allows them to travel within the United States. Refugees by the hundreds began arriving at Miami bus stations this week.
NEWS
May 6, 1994 | Reuters
Three members of Congress were arrested Thursday in front of the White House in a protest against the U.S. policy of forcibly returning Haitian refugees. Reps. Maxine Waters (D-Los Angeles), Alcee L. Hastings (D-Fla.) and Nydia M. Velazquez (D-N.Y.) were handcuffed and taken into custody for refusing a police order to move. They were later released. The three were protesting the U.S.
WORLD
October 10, 2003 | Paul Richter, Times Staff Writer
The Bush administration is launching a new effort to consider how the United States can help create a democratic, free-market government in Cuba once President Fidel Castro is gone, according to U.S. officials and advocacy group members. The White House has scheduled a Cuba-related public event for this morning and is expected to announce that top U.S. officials are being asked to draw up new recommendations on how an eventual transition should be handled.
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