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NEWS
May 1, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of holding the rebels at arm's length, the Clinton administration is now quietly considering the use of the Kosovo Liberation Army to help funnel food and other aid to refugees in Kosovo, say relief groups and U.S. officials.
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NEWS
May 1, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of holding the rebels at arm's length, the Clinton administration is now quietly considering the use of the Kosovo Liberation Army to help funnel food and other aid to refugees in Kosovo, say relief groups and U.S. officials.
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NEWS
August 19, 1989 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, Times Staff Writer
Representatives of agencies that help Soviet refugees learn English and find jobs said Friday that they are bracing for a dramatic increase in the number of new immigrants moving to the Southland in the next year as a result of the Soviet Union's perestroika policy.
NEWS
April 17, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As exhausted and terrified Kosovo Albanians poured into Macedonia and Albania in accelerating numbers Friday, the Pentagon announced that it is holding its first prisoner of war from the Balkan campaign, a Yugoslav army officer captured by the insurgent Kosovo Liberation Army. The Pentagon said the officer was seized by the KLA in an overnight ground operation Wednesday near Junik, on the Yugoslav border with Albania. The KLA turned him over to the Albanian government, which delivered him to U.
NEWS
April 17, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As exhausted and terrified Kosovo Albanians poured into Macedonia and Albania in accelerating numbers Friday, the Pentagon announced that it is holding its first prisoner of war from the Balkan campaign, a Yugoslav army officer captured by the insurgent Kosovo Liberation Army. The Pentagon said the officer was seized by the KLA in an overnight ground operation Wednesday near Junik, on the Yugoslav border with Albania. The KLA turned him over to the Albanian government, which delivered him to U.
NEWS
October 14, 2001 | RONE TEMPEST and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As American bombs slammed into Afghanistan for a seventh day Saturday, fighters of the ruling Taliban have taken cover in the mountains or in heavily populated urban areas, according to refugees and the extensive military intelligence network here in neighboring Pakistan. In fact, city centers are sufficiently tranquil that large numbers of regular Taliban have brought their small arms with them, these sources say.
OPINION
March 15, 1987 | James J. Silk, James J. Silk is the author of "Despite a Generous Spirit: Denying Asylum in the United States," published in December by the United States Committee for Refugees.
The Supreme Court decision last week on aliens seeking U.S. asylum could contribute, at least indirectly, to the safety of refugees throughout the world. The court ruled that the government has been using too strict a standard to decide whether aliens who say they fear persecution in their homelands are eligible for asylum in the United States. The case, Immigration and Naturalization Service vs. Cardoza-Fonseca, involved a Nicaraguan woman whose application for asylum was denied.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 22, 1991 | DENNIS GALLAGHER, Dennis Gallagher is executive director of the Refugee Policy Group, a center for policy analysis and research on refugee issues in Washington
Six months ago it would have been hard to believe that Cambodia's warring factions would be ready to stop fighting, agree to settle all their differences and sign a comprehensive peace treaty on Wednesday in Paris. Yet that is exactly what has happened since the Cambodians decided they couldn't win on the battlefield. The agreement came so suddenly, in fact, that the United Nations, United States and other concerned parties risk being left behind.
NEWS
August 19, 1989 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, Times Staff Writer
Representatives of agencies that help Soviet refugees learn English and find jobs said Friday that they are bracing for a dramatic increase in the number of new immigrants moving to the Southland in the next year as a result of the Soviet Union's perestroika policy.
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