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Refugees Germany

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1989 | BOB SCHWARTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As an 8-year-old Jewish boy in Hamburg, Max Wolfsberg saw Hitler. He and his family survived anxious moments during the frightful Kristallnacht in 1938, and they fled Germany the following year, a week before the Nazis launched their invasion of Poland.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1995 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Save for a now obscure act of the British government, Ernie Green, like Anne Frank, probably would have died in a concentration camp. But instead of being another number in Adolf Hitler's "final solution," Green became one of 10,000 Jewish youths known as "Kindertransports" who were spirited out of Europe to the relative safety of Great Britain just before World War II.
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NEWS
September 1, 1992 | From Reuters
The German Parliament's Domestic Affairs Committee held an emergency meeting Monday to discuss right-wing violence rocking the country's troubled east but was unable to agree on ways to combat the unrest. Government politicians renewed demands that the opposition Social Democratic Party agree to amend the constitution to limit a stream of foreign refugees coming to Germany in search of political asylum.
NEWS
May 29, 1993 | From Associated Press
One of the world's most generous refugee policies passed into history Friday as Germany's Parliament gave final approval to a law that closes the country to most asylum-seekers. The new policy becomes law July 1, replacing measures written into the 1949 constitution in atonement for Nazi persecution. It also coincides with European Community discussions on tougher new immigration controls. The vote could set off a rush of foreigners over the border seeking to beat the deadline.
NEWS
December 25, 1991 | Associated Press
Right-wing radicals attacked two shelters for foreign asylum-seekers, police reported Tuesday, but President Richard von Weiszaecker used his Christmas message to urge respect for foreigners. No injuries were reported in the attacks on shelters in Jueterbog, 30 miles south of Berlin. Police said that about 25 young radicals threw stones at one shelter late Monday and later a firebomb was thrown at a second shelter.
NEWS
May 29, 1993 | From Associated Press
One of the world's most generous refugee policies passed into history Friday as Germany's Parliament gave final approval to a law that closes the country to most asylum-seekers. The new policy becomes law July 1, replacing measures written into the 1949 constitution in atonement for Nazi persecution. It also coincides with European Community discussions on tougher new immigration controls. The vote could set off a rush of foreigners over the border seeking to beat the deadline.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Busloads of asylum seekers left a crowded refugee camp in eastern Germany as authorities sought to defuse a potentially explosive situation at the scene of last year's racist riots. Officials said that about 700 refugees, most of them Romanians, were being taken from an overflowing refugee center in a suburb of Rostock to hostels in other German states. Neighbors had expressed dismay at the concentration of refugees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1995 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Save for a now obscure act of the British government, Ernie Green, like Anne Frank, probably would have died in a concentration camp. But instead of being another number in Adolf Hitler's "final solution," Green became one of 10,000 Jewish youths known as "Kindertransports" who were spirited out of Europe to the relative safety of Great Britain just before World War II.
NEWS
May 27, 1993 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German lawmakers approved a controversial new asylum law Wednesday to halt the costly annual influx of nearly half a million foreigners, effectively slamming shut the industrialized world's last open door for economic refugees. About 10,000 angry protesters blockaded the seat of government in Bonn, throwing rocks, bottles and paint-filled balloons at legislators trying to reach the Bundestag building on the banks of the Rhine.
NEWS
October 24, 1991 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is nearly 2 a.m., another Saturday night slipping away, and a young German couple stand determinedly in the cold drizzle outside a row of converted cargo containers where 20 refugee families live. Sleepy children and worried mothers hover in the doorways; the men stand outside with the Germans, silently pulling at a bottle of schnapps. Foreboding pulses through the night, flickering on and off like the fluorescent bulbs that light the scene.
NEWS
May 27, 1993 | TAMARA JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
German lawmakers approved a controversial new asylum law Wednesday to halt the costly annual influx of nearly half a million foreigners, effectively slamming shut the industrialized world's last open door for economic refugees. About 10,000 angry protesters blockaded the seat of government in Bonn, throwing rocks, bottles and paint-filled balloons at legislators trying to reach the Bundestag building on the banks of the Rhine.
NEWS
March 16, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Busloads of asylum seekers left a crowded refugee camp in eastern Germany as authorities sought to defuse a potentially explosive situation at the scene of last year's racist riots. Officials said that about 700 refugees, most of them Romanians, were being taken from an overflowing refugee center in a suburb of Rostock to hostels in other German states. Neighbors had expressed dismay at the concentration of refugees.
NEWS
November 13, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Following a prolonged struggle with their conscience, Germany's main opposition Social Democrats are expected next week to bow to mounting public pressure and approve proposals that will permit a tightening of the industrialized world's most liberal political asylum law. Germany's effectively open-door policy to asylum-seekers--for decades a proud symbol of the post-World War II democratic state's good intent--has in recent years sown the seeds of a domestic nightmare.
NEWS
November 13, 1992 | MARC FISHER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Alex Mathes, a retired baker in Philadelphia, swore never to return to the accursed country where he spent his first 26 years. He even forbade his children to set foot on German soil. During Nazi rule, the people of Brand, the town his ancestors had called home for hundreds of years, hounded Mathes' parents out of the bakery business, forced them out of their own house and finally packed them onto a transport train. Alex escaped, but most of his family was gassed in one death camp or another.
NEWS
September 1, 1992 | From Reuters
The German Parliament's Domestic Affairs Committee held an emergency meeting Monday to discuss right-wing violence rocking the country's troubled east but was unable to agree on ways to combat the unrest. Government politicians renewed demands that the opposition Social Democratic Party agree to amend the constitution to limit a stream of foreign refugees coming to Germany in search of political asylum.
NEWS
August 25, 1992 | Reuters
Hundreds of German right-wingers cheered on by a crowd clashed with police and attacked a refugee hostel Monday in the third straight night of anti-foreigner violence in the eastern city of Rostock. The neo-Nazi attackers threw stones and fire bombs at the hostel for foreign asylum-seekers hours after all 200 refugees there, most of them Romanian Gypsies, had been evacuated.
NEWS
November 13, 1992 | MARC FISHER, THE WASHINGTON POST
Alex Mathes, a retired baker in Philadelphia, swore never to return to the accursed country where he spent his first 26 years. He even forbade his children to set foot on German soil. During Nazi rule, the people of Brand, the town his ancestors had called home for hundreds of years, hounded Mathes' parents out of the bakery business, forced them out of their own house and finally packed them onto a transport train. Alex escaped, but most of his family was gassed in one death camp or another.
NEWS
August 25, 1992 | Reuters
Hundreds of German right-wingers cheered on by a crowd clashed with police and attacked a refugee hostel Monday in the third straight night of anti-foreigner violence in the eastern city of Rostock. The neo-Nazi attackers threw stones and fire bombs at the hostel for foreign asylum-seekers hours after all 200 refugees there, most of them Romanian Gypsies, had been evacuated.
NEWS
February 18, 1992 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the worried Munich city welfare official, it was one more piece of bad news. The rise in the number of foreigners seeking political asylum in Germany had reached a point where the already overcrowded Bavarian capital would have to house new arrivals at a rate of 250 a week instead of the previous 150. "Where are they going to go?" asked the official, Hans Stuetzle, director of the social affairs department of the Munich city government.
NEWS
December 25, 1991 | Associated Press
Right-wing radicals attacked two shelters for foreign asylum-seekers, police reported Tuesday, but President Richard von Weiszaecker used his Christmas message to urge respect for foreigners. No injuries were reported in the attacks on shelters in Jueterbog, 30 miles south of Berlin. Police said that about 25 young radicals threw stones at one shelter late Monday and later a firebomb was thrown at a second shelter.
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