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NEWS
March 30, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After six months and nearly 600 miles, a long-missing group of Rwandan Hutu refugees has reached the end of the road in a sad, strange odyssey. Here in Zaire's jungle gloom, where towering trees and thick foliage block the equatorial sun, most of the refugees--who fled deeper into Zaire last year instead of returning home with hundreds of thousands of their brethren--say they have been on the run long enough. Now they want to go home.
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NEWS
May 5, 1999 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They call it the Kukes cough. Feverish infants wrapped in dirty blankets who are hauled by refugee mothers to the medical tents have it. So do many of the elderly women sleeping three or four to a bed in the overrun emergency ward of Kukes Regional Hospital. The deep, chest-heaving hack can be heard all through the night in the muddy, garbage-strewn encampments in northern Albania that are home to tens of thousands of Kosovo refugees, most of whom were not so long ago underfed and exhausted.
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NEWS
July 22, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The acrid stench of death filled the air here Thursday, as hundreds upon hundreds of corpses--a few here, a dozen a few yards farther, 25 more just beyond--lined dusty roads and littered the cruel fields of what has become the world's closest glimpse of hell.
NEWS
May 12, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
An aid mission to an area of eastern Zaire not visited by United Nations officials for weeks has discovered thousands of Rwandan Hutu refugees, many on the verge of death, U.N. officials said. Aid officials who traveled to Ubolo village distributed 26 tons of food before leaving with 468 refugees, mainly children. "We found about 5,000 to 6,000 refugees near a village [51 miles] south of Kisangani," said Julian Fleet, a U.N. refugee agency official who led the mission.
NEWS
May 5, 1999 | MARC LACEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They call it the Kukes cough. Feverish infants wrapped in dirty blankets who are hauled by refugee mothers to the medical tents have it. So do many of the elderly women sleeping three or four to a bed in the overrun emergency ward of Kukes Regional Hospital. The deep, chest-heaving hack can be heard all through the night in the muddy, garbage-strewn encampments in northern Albania that are home to tens of thousands of Kosovo refugees, most of whom were not so long ago underfed and exhausted.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Desperately needed food and water finally arrived at this nightmarish camp for 150,000 sick and weakened Rwandan refugees Saturday, but the living literally had to walk over and around the dead to reach it. Corpses of cholera victims, many of them uncovered and rotting in the hot African sun, piled up on this desolate volcanic wasteland.
NEWS
May 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
Rebels dumped truckloads and trainloads of sick and starving refugees on unprepared aid workers, who flew 236 children home to Rwanda on Wednesday and struggled to deal with the rest. In the squalid camps south of this northeastern Zairian city, refugees fought for biscuits, famished after days hiding in the jungle. Many were sick with cholera and malaria. A mother at a Kisangani transit camp clung to her dead child. "This is a chaos," U.N.
NEWS
May 5, 1997 | From Reuters
More than 100 Hutu refugees suffocated or were crushed to death Sunday in a train carrying them from a refugee camp in Zaire to be airlifted home to Rwanda, a U.N. official said. Aid workers and journalists saw dozens of bodies tumbling from open railroad cars as the train carrying them from Biaro, about 25 miles away, pulled into Kisangani station in northeastern Zaire. The weak, children and dozens of desperately ill adults aboard had been forced to the bottom of the cars in the crush.
NEWS
August 16, 1989
Vietnamese refugees in Hong Kong's teeming detention centers are threatened by malnutrition and disease, the top U.N. refugee official in the colony said. Robert van Leeuwen called for better food and "a massive immunization campaign" for "boat people" being housed on an outlying island and on five ferries in Hong Kong's harbor. Van Leeuwen based his statements on a preliminary report by U.N. officials about camps housing 6,700 of Hong Kong's 51,000 refugees.
NEWS
May 12, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
An aid mission to an area of eastern Zaire not visited by United Nations officials for weeks has discovered thousands of Rwandan Hutu refugees, many on the verge of death, U.N. officials said. Aid officials who traveled to Ubolo village distributed 26 tons of food before leaving with 468 refugees, mainly children. "We found about 5,000 to 6,000 refugees near a village [51 miles] south of Kisangani," said Julian Fleet, a U.N. refugee agency official who led the mission.
NEWS
May 5, 1997 | From Reuters
More than 100 Hutu refugees suffocated or were crushed to death Sunday in a train carrying them from a refugee camp in Zaire to be airlifted home to Rwanda, a U.N. official said. Aid workers and journalists saw dozens of bodies tumbling from open railroad cars as the train carrying them from Biaro, about 25 miles away, pulled into Kisangani station in northeastern Zaire. The weak, children and dozens of desperately ill adults aboard had been forced to the bottom of the cars in the crush.
NEWS
May 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
Rebels dumped truckloads and trainloads of sick and starving refugees on unprepared aid workers, who flew 236 children home to Rwanda on Wednesday and struggled to deal with the rest. In the squalid camps south of this northeastern Zairian city, refugees fought for biscuits, famished after days hiding in the jungle. Many were sick with cholera and malaria. A mother at a Kisangani transit camp clung to her dead child. "This is a chaos," U.N.
NEWS
March 30, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After six months and nearly 600 miles, a long-missing group of Rwandan Hutu refugees has reached the end of the road in a sad, strange odyssey. Here in Zaire's jungle gloom, where towering trees and thick foliage block the equatorial sun, most of the refugees--who fled deeper into Zaire last year instead of returning home with hundreds of thousands of their brethren--say they have been on the run long enough. Now they want to go home.
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The night before, the sky had blazed with lightning and the rain had fallen hard enough to bounce off the rocks. A new breed of angry young thugs had gone marauding. Friday morning, it rains again, a mountain rain with a chill to it. The people rise from the ground to count their losses, if they still have anything left to lose. So begins another day: The blue 1 1/2-ton trucks start down the narrow, potholed roads on their twice-a-day rounds to gather up the bodies.
NEWS
August 10, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defeated and bitter Rwandan army soldiers have begun killing some of their own people to stop them from returning home. And if that were not misery enough for the 900,000 refugees here, an outbreak of yet another killer disease has begun--a mysterious fever that is suspected to be typhus. U.N. relief officials said Tuesday they have confirmed that a refugee was beaten to death at a nearby camp after urging his countrymen to return home to Rwanda.
NEWS
August 7, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Morning arrives swiftly in equatorial Africa. There is hardly a sunrise before a gray-white glow illuminates the sky like a dirty fluorescent bulb. But the sky itself is barely visible. Right now, Zairian farmers are burning brush lands so the grass will grow green in the coming rainy season. Not far from the highway, the flat-topped volcano Nyiragongo spews its gases. Powdery dust rises with every relief convoy, every footstep.
NEWS
July 21, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A weeklong exodus of biblical proportions of Rwandan refugees into neighboring Zaire appeared to slow Wednesday, relief workers said, but deadly disease and hunger are growing among the estimated 2 million people who have already fled the tiny war-torn nation.
NEWS
August 5, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The existence that passes as living for the 1 million Rwandan refugees in this country grew better Thursday, and, of course, worse--and all the while more tangled and troubling. Finally, the rising tide of cholera, which killed so many thousands, was declared medically contained. The squalid camps spread north and south of here even began to show the faint sparks of vigor. But with vigor has come new tensions, killing and the threat of spreading political discontent.
NEWS
August 5, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The existence that passes as living for the 1 million Rwandan refugees in this country grew better Thursday, and, of course, worse--and all the while more tangled and troubling. Finally, the rising tide of cholera, which killed so many thousands, was declared medically contained. The squalid camps spread north and south of here even began to show the faint sparks of vigor. But with vigor has come new tensions, killing and the threat of spreading political discontent.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | Times Wire Services
As dysentery steals cholera's grim title as the most widespread affliction in Goma's refugee camps, one relief official Tuesday predicted the almost unimaginable--an upsurge in deaths. Children will be hardest hit, she said, by the deadly dysentery spreading among the more than 1 million Rwandans jammed into camps along Zaire's eastern border. "Dysentery has overtaken cholera" as the main disease afflicting refugees, said Samantha Bolton of the relief group Doctors Without Borders.
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