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Refugees Hungary

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October 5, 1991 | Reuters
The Hungarian government tightened border controls Friday to ensure that foreigners who arrive have the ways and means to leave, the state MTI news agency reported. Hungary faces a rising tide of refugees from the civil war in Yugoslavia and a steady influx of other foreigners trying to pass through to Western Europe.
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NEWS
October 5, 1991 | Reuters
The Hungarian government tightened border controls Friday to ensure that foreigners who arrive have the ways and means to leave, the state MTI news agency reported. Hungary faces a rising tide of refugees from the civil war in Yugoslavia and a steady influx of other foreigners trying to pass through to Western Europe.
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NEWS
July 11, 1989 | From Reuters
Thirty-eight years after crawling in the snow past armed soldiers patrolling the Hungarian border, Charles Tasnadi is going back to Hungary today in President Bush's presidential jet. For Tasnadi, 64, a news photographer, it will be his first trip home since the night in 1951 when he and his fiancee, Maria, escaped to the West through the "Iron Curtain." "I've waited a long time for this. I wouldn't trade a million dollars for the feeling," Tasnadi said.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a crowded storefront office pungent with the scents of cheap tobacco and unwashed clothes, Istvan and Agnes Magda shuffle dejectedly through a worn sheaf of index cards hawking the hardest of work for the lowest of wages. The ethnic Hungarian couple has fled Romania less than six weeks before their first child is due, leaving behind their families, good jobs, a two-room house and the Transylvanian homeland that was the only life they have ever known.
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | Associated Press
The Bush Administration on Wednesday virtually cut off the prospects for most Polish and Hungarian refugees in Western Europe to resettle in the United States any time soon. Citing "the democratic evolution" in those nations, the State Department said it will process no new applications by Polish and Hungarian refugees.
NEWS
September 16, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
The nation of Hungary will not be deflected from its liberal course in foreign affairs by objections from its hard-line socialist neighbors, one of the leading architects of Hungarian foreign policy said Friday. Laszlo Kovacs, a secretary of state and deputy to Foreign Minister Gyula Horn, also confirmed that Hungary has no intention of closing off its Western borders to thousands of East German citizens who may want to emigrate to West Germany "until the present situation is resolved."
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A growing proportion of East European refugees coming to the United States will be from countries other than Poland and Hungary under a new policy based on the danger of persecution, Bush Administration officials said. Officials told a House subcommittee that the governments of Poland and Hungary are growing more liberal--so that the danger of persecution there is receding--but that is not true in Czechoslovakia and Romania.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | Times Wire Services
President Bush signed into law a $14.6-billion foreign aid bill Tuesday night that includes the first cash in a promised three-year aid program for Poland and Hungary. The measure includes $533 million in new aid for Poland and Hungary, aid that has become politically popular because of the wave of economic and political reform sweeping Eastern Europe.
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Moving to abate a growing political crisis, the Communist regime of East Germany on Tuesday demanded that Hungary curb the tide of East Germans crossing the border to the West as refugees continued to arrive at camps here and elsewhere. "East Germany expects Hungary immediately to take back its unilateral decision to suspend parts of the agreement on visa-free travel," said an official protest to the Hungarian government whose text was reported by the state-run ADN news agency.
NEWS
October 6, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
On the eve of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's visit to East Germany, the Communist regime has warned that a Chinese-style crackdown could occur here if demonstrations erupt during the 40th anniversary of the Communist state this weekend, a prominent reform figure reported Thursday.
NEWS
November 23, 1989 | Associated Press
The Bush Administration on Wednesday virtually cut off the prospects for most Polish and Hungarian refugees in Western Europe to resettle in the United States any time soon. Citing "the democratic evolution" in those nations, the State Department said it will process no new applications by Polish and Hungarian refugees.
NEWS
November 22, 1989 | Times Wire Services
President Bush signed into law a $14.6-billion foreign aid bill Tuesday night that includes the first cash in a promised three-year aid program for Poland and Hungary. The measure includes $533 million in new aid for Poland and Hungary, aid that has become politically popular because of the wave of economic and political reform sweeping Eastern Europe.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A growing proportion of East European refugees coming to the United States will be from countries other than Poland and Hungary under a new policy based on the danger of persecution, Bush Administration officials said. Officials told a House subcommittee that the governments of Poland and Hungary are growing more liberal--so that the danger of persecution there is receding--but that is not true in Czechoslovakia and Romania.
NEWS
October 6, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
On the eve of Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev's visit to East Germany, the Communist regime has warned that a Chinese-style crackdown could occur here if demonstrations erupt during the 40th anniversary of the Communist state this weekend, a prominent reform figure reported Thursday.
NEWS
September 16, 1989 | CHARLES T. POWERS, Times Staff Writer
The nation of Hungary will not be deflected from its liberal course in foreign affairs by objections from its hard-line socialist neighbors, one of the leading architects of Hungarian foreign policy said Friday. Laszlo Kovacs, a secretary of state and deputy to Foreign Minister Gyula Horn, also confirmed that Hungary has no intention of closing off its Western borders to thousands of East German citizens who may want to emigrate to West Germany "until the present situation is resolved."
NEWS
September 13, 1989 | WILLIAM TUOHY, Times Staff Writer
Moving to abate a growing political crisis, the Communist regime of East Germany on Tuesday demanded that Hungary curb the tide of East Germans crossing the border to the West as refugees continued to arrive at camps here and elsewhere. "East Germany expects Hungary immediately to take back its unilateral decision to suspend parts of the agreement on visa-free travel," said an official protest to the Hungarian government whose text was reported by the state-run ADN news agency.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
From the moment she saw that supermarkets in this capital overflowed with food and that people didn't cringe automatically when police appeared, May Li began mulling the idea over in her mind. Li, who is afraid to disclose her real name or nationality for fear of reprisal, is an exchange student from a Communist country in the Far East. Here in socialist Hungary, she is learning technical skills desperately needed by her developing nation. But 30-year-old Li has other plans.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a crowded storefront office pungent with the scents of cheap tobacco and unwashed clothes, Istvan and Agnes Magda shuffle dejectedly through a worn sheaf of index cards hawking the hardest of work for the lowest of wages. The ethnic Hungarian couple has fled Romania less than six weeks before their first child is due, leaving behind their families, good jobs, a two-room house and the Transylvanian homeland that was the only life they have ever known.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | DENISE HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
From the moment she saw that supermarkets in this capital overflowed with food and that people didn't cringe automatically when police appeared, May Li began mulling the idea over in her mind. Li, who is afraid to disclose her real name or nationality for fear of reprisal, is an exchange student from a Communist country in the Far East. Here in socialist Hungary, she is learning technical skills desperately needed by her developing nation. But 30-year-old Li has other plans.
NEWS
July 11, 1989 | From Reuters
Thirty-eight years after crawling in the snow past armed soldiers patrolling the Hungarian border, Charles Tasnadi is going back to Hungary today in President Bush's presidential jet. For Tasnadi, 64, a news photographer, it will be his first trip home since the night in 1951 when he and his fiancee, Maria, escaped to the West through the "Iron Curtain." "I've waited a long time for this. I wouldn't trade a million dollars for the feeling," Tasnadi said.
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