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Refugees Iran

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NEWS
November 29, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Which country is the most magnanimous toward refugees? Not Sweden, Canada or Switzerland. Although not generally regarded in the West as a charitable country, Iran for most of the last two decades has provided haven to more refugees than any other nation. Afghans, Tajiks, Azeris and Iraqi Arabs and Kurds have sought shelter here, escaping civil war, insecurity and oppression in their homelands.
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WORLD
January 24, 2005 | Nahid Siamdoust, Special to The Times
The Iraqis say they've created a little Baghdad here on the southern outskirts of Tehran. The streets of Dowlatabad buzz with Arabic, not Persian, and falafel stands line the alleys. For more than three decades, this impoverished neighborhood offered refuge to Iraqis expelled by Saddam Hussein's Baathist government. With Iraq's elections fast approaching, a registration and polling station has opened for Iraqi refugees here. Bright banners bear slogans such as "The future awaits us!"
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NEWS
July 29, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This port city, which has been damaged in two wars and a brief rebellion immediately after the Gulf War, continues to be a flash point for this region's troubles as well as a haven for its dispossessed. About 80 refugees from Iran walk in almost every day through Tununa, a section of Basra that was a trench-filled no-man's-land during the eight-year Iran-Iraq War. They are former Iraqi prisoners of that war or Iraqi civilians dispossessed during it. They receive help from the U.N.
NEWS
December 25, 2001 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this hilly suburb west of Tehran, Afghanistan's future sneaks into Nabil's courtyard at the end of a narrow alley. The children who enter through the white metal gate are in the country illegally and therefore are forbidden to attend Iranian schools. So they come to Nabil's secret version, run by the Afghan expatriate in his 10-by-12-foot living room with peeling plaster and little else. At Nabil's school, there are no brightly painted murals such as those decorating Iranian ones.
NEWS
April 5, 1991 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Iran has asked for international assistance to cope with the influx of more than 1 million Kurdish refugees--many suffering from illness, exposure and hunger--massed in the last three days on its border with Iraq, the official Iranian news agency reported Thursday. Iranian Foreign Minister Ali Akbar Velayati has called for help from the Office of the U.N.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Army forces began building a processing center here Friday to dispatch the first of an estimated 8,000 Iraqi refugees to Saudi Arabia, which has agreed to grant them asylum in a large new camp on the Saudi-Iraqi border. The first 500 refugees are scheduled to leave southern Iraq on Sunday. This week, Iran also began accepting the first of about 2,000 Iraqi refugees with family or religious ties to Iran.
NEWS
April 13, 1991 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bundled against the harsh wind, they came by the thousands Friday--exhausted, dispirited, hungry, thirsty, stoic Kurds trudging on foot and in taxis, trucks and farm tractors across this snow-shouldered, mile-high pass toward the safety of Iran.
NEWS
January 4, 1988
Hunger-striking Iranian refugees in France neared what a physician called the dangerous four-week mark in their fast to demand the return of 14 expelled anti-Khomeini activists. The protesters, camped at the entrance of the U.N. Office of the High Commissioner for Refugees, began their 28th day without food, and an ambulance took away one of them, a young woman. That brought to 10 the number of strikers in Paris-area hospitals, a spokesman said.
NEWS
January 16, 1988 | STANLEY MEISLER, Times Staff Writer
Premier Jacques Chirac, as he opens his campaign for the presidency of France, will have a hard time shaking away the fumbling and embarrassing image of his government's handling of anti-Khomeini Iranian refugees--first expelling them to please Iran and then suddenly reversing the order to quiet French public opinion and the rest of the world.
NEWS
January 12, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The French police rounded up 14 exiled opponents of Iranian leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini in Paris last month and dragged them, kicking and screaming, to the airport and a waiting chartered airplane. As the plane took off, some of the refugees vowed to commit suicide, fearing they were being ferried to Iran and to certain execution. But about six hours after leaving wintry Paris, the plane touched down in the tiny, steamy equatorial African country of Gabon, a one-time French colony.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 10, 2001 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To Jews, it's a mitzvah, or commandment, to extend a helping hand to someone less fortunate. To the jailed Muslim who recently grasped that hand, it was a ness, or miracle. For the paths of Pooya Dayanim and Dariush Farshidian were not ones likely to cross. Dayanim is a prominent Jewish Iranian, executive director of a two-decade-old philanthropic group based in Los Angeles and a vocal opponent of the Muslim clerics governing his homeland. He is eloquent and outgoing.
NEWS
November 29, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Which country is the most magnanimous toward refugees? Not Sweden, Canada or Switzerland. Although not generally regarded in the West as a charitable country, Iran for most of the last two decades has provided haven to more refugees than any other nation. Afghans, Tajiks, Azeris and Iraqi Arabs and Kurds have sought shelter here, escaping civil war, insecurity and oppression in their homelands.
NEWS
July 5, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A young man who claims to be the son of former Revolutionary Guard Commander Maj. Gen. Mohsen Rezai, one of the most powerful men in Iran, has fled to the United States, where he has been granted refugee status, he said in an interview with The Times on Saturday. He is living in the Los Angeles area. Ahmad Rezai, 21, said he left Iran to protest the policies of the government, including its support of extremist groups and use of terrorist tactics abroad.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1996 | DOUG SMITH and EFRAIN HERNANDEZ JR., TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A father accused of killing his wife and six children by setting fire to their Glendale apartment apparently gained entry to the United States by concealing a criminal record in his native Iran when he was questioned under oath, federal officials said Thursday. Jorjik Avanesian, 40, charged with arson and seven counts of murder, has told police and others that he served eight months in an Iranian prison for stabbing his wife. That crime should have disqualified him from the U.S.
NEWS
May 19, 1995 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Alfred Nasseri arrived at Charles de Gaulle Airport in 1988, he paused in the lounge to jot a few words in his diary while waiting for the authorities to sort out a small immigration matter. Nasseri is still there, more than six years and 6,000 diary pages later, unable to enter France and unable to leave. He is a man without a country in a Europe that, technically at least, is without borders.
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This port city, which has been damaged in two wars and a brief rebellion immediately after the Gulf War, continues to be a flash point for this region's troubles as well as a haven for its dispossessed. About 80 refugees from Iran walk in almost every day through Tununa, a section of Basra that was a trench-filled no-man's-land during the eight-year Iran-Iraq War. They are former Iraqi prisoners of that war or Iraqi civilians dispossessed during it. They receive help from the U.N.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Increasingly confident of allied promises to protect them, Kurdish refugees abandoned perilous mountain camps for haven in northern Iraq in dramatically growing numbers Friday, U.S. officials said. At the same time, allied troops peacefully secured new eastern areas of a sanctuary in Iraq next to the Turkish border in which no Iraqi military presence is permitted.
NEWS
April 27, 1991 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. Army forces began building a processing center here Friday to dispatch the first of an estimated 8,000 Iraqi refugees to Saudi Arabia, which has agreed to grant them asylum in a large new camp on the Saudi-Iraqi border. The first 500 refugees are scheduled to leave southern Iraq on Sunday. This week, Iran also began accepting the first of about 2,000 Iraqi refugees with family or religious ties to Iran.
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