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Refugees Iraq

NEWS
May 14, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III, responding to growing Soviet concern about the presence of U.S. combat troops in northern Iraq, said Monday that American forces cannot withdraw unless Moscow permits the United Nations to assume responsibility for the safety of Kurdish refugees. In comments to reporters after a two-hour meeting, Baker and Soviet Foreign Minister Alexander A.
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NEWS
May 14, 1991 | Associated Press
British marines wounded two Iraqi soldiers Monday in the first exchange of gunfire since coalition troops arrived in northern Iraq, officials said. Elsewhere, Kurdish refugees rioted in opposition to Saddam Hussein, overturning cars and attacking Iraqi police until U.S. forces intervened. A patrol of 10 British marines fired on Iraqi soldiers at one of Hussein's summer palaces near the city of Sirsenk after being fired on twice, British spokesmen said.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven Polish pilots will fly Iraqi helicopters today on a mission of compromise over the Kurdish regions of the north. The flight of crop dusters marks a crucial step in bridging political and humanitarian imperatives in the refugee crisis. It wasn't easy. Prince Sadruddin Aga Khan, the top U.N. official for delivering relief to an estimated 1.
NEWS
May 13, 1991 | WILLIAM BRANIGIN, THE WASHINGTON POST
Kurdish elders Sunday rejected an Iraqi proposal for the return of as many as 200,000 Kurds to their homes in the northern Iraqi city of Dahuk, dealing a setback to U.S. efforts to broker a solution to a massive refugee problem. For an unusual meeting in the refugee "way station" of Kani Masi, Kurdish guerrilla representatives, Iraqi generals and U.S. Army officers were flown in by U.S.
NEWS
May 12, 1991 | From Associated Press
Allied troops loaded Kurdish refugees onto trucks and buses Saturday, beginning a mass repatriation, and authorities said about 200,000 Kurds have already returned to northern Iraq on their own. The figure for returnees is far higher than previous estimates by relief organizers. Earlier this week, officials said 50,000 Kurds had gone back.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A freshly hung portrait of Saddam Hussein smiled down from a battle-scarred wall in this tense and desolate border town Friday as international observers pronounced the region free of military armed forces for the first time since the Persian Gulf War. Scarcely 48 hours after U.S. troops withdrew from southern Iraq, Safwan is being pulled back under the control of Iraqi authorities. The transition is not smooth.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the crushed Arab tribespeople of the villages near Sumail, the allied security zone in northern Iraq has already turned into what the Western coalition vowed it would never be: a Kurdish enclave that is a virtual mini-state in all but name. "The Kurds came here and told us, 'We'll massacre you if you don't get out,' " said Jamila Shaaba, an Arab mother loading a truck with bedsteads and hardware, adding her voice to the cries for justice that have become familiar in this troubled land.
NEWS
May 10, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar delivered the disappointing news to President Bush on Thursday that the Iraqi government has rejected a plan to replace U.S. and other allied troops protecting Kurdish refugees in northern Iraq with U.N. police forces. While U.S.
NEWS
May 8, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Struggling to avoid responsibility for any future Kurdish disaster, the chief U.N. refugee agency started registering Iraqi refugees in Turkish border camps Tuesday, saying they could stay if they did not yet believe assurances that it was safe to go home. Thousands of refugee Kurds jammed rocky mountain passes on the first day of mass movement to the allied protected zone in northern Iraq on Tuesday, but a senior U.N.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Faced with the mounting threat of hot-weather diseases such as cholera in refugee camps along the Turkish-Iraqi border, U.S. forces plan to use truck convoys to start shifting refugees more quickly down to the allied-protected haven in northern Iraq, U.S. military spokesmen said Monday. U.S. Marines kept up their psychological pressure on Iraqi troops in the northern Iraqi provincial capital of Dahuk, a major city from which many of the refugees fled.
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