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Refugees Iraq

NEWS
May 11, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the crushed Arab tribespeople of the villages near Sumail, the allied security zone in northern Iraq has already turned into what the Western coalition vowed it would never be: a Kurdish enclave that is a virtual mini-state in all but name. "The Kurds came here and told us, 'We'll massacre you if you don't get out,' " said Jamila Shaaba, an Arab mother loading a truck with bedsteads and hardware, adding her voice to the cries for justice that have become familiar in this troubled land.
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NEWS
May 10, 1991 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar delivered the disappointing news to President Bush on Thursday that the Iraqi government has rejected a plan to replace U.S. and other allied troops protecting Kurdish refugees in northern Iraq with U.N. police forces. While U.S.
NEWS
May 8, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Struggling to avoid responsibility for any future Kurdish disaster, the chief U.N. refugee agency started registering Iraqi refugees in Turkish border camps Tuesday, saying they could stay if they did not yet believe assurances that it was safe to go home. Thousands of refugee Kurds jammed rocky mountain passes on the first day of mass movement to the allied protected zone in northern Iraq on Tuesday, but a senior U.N.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Faced with the mounting threat of hot-weather diseases such as cholera in refugee camps along the Turkish-Iraqi border, U.S. forces plan to use truck convoys to start shifting refugees more quickly down to the allied-protected haven in northern Iraq, U.S. military spokesmen said Monday. U.S. Marines kept up their psychological pressure on Iraqi troops in the northern Iraqi provincial capital of Dahuk, a major city from which many of the refugees fled.
NEWS
May 7, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last of more than 8,000 Iraqi refugees under U.S. care in southern Iraq were airlifted to Saudi Arabia on Monday while this tiny, wrecked town braced for the final departure of American troops. The crowded camp that once gave shelter to Iraqis fleeing civil warfare in southern Iraq was empty Monday, except for a handful of U.S. soldiers, tanks and armored vehicles.
NEWS
May 6, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
American airborne troopers again expanded the protected zone for refugees in northern Iraq on Sunday, pushing south to the outskirts of a provincial capital and driving Iraqi army units before them. The advance, supported by jets and helicopters, came without incident, with Iraqi units withdrawing as the Americans arrived, U.S. spokesmen said.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With U.S. and allied forces expanding their haven for refugees in northern Iraq, President Bush reiterated Saturday that the United States is not setting up a permanent security zone in Iraq for the Kurds. Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's troops have now been barred from a border zone 80 miles long and 36 miles deep, as U.S., British and French troops clear the Iraqis out of a widening zone across the northern portion of the war-torn country.
NEWS
May 5, 1991 | HUGH POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a touching moment as ancient ways met modern times and the aging Iraqi Kurdish clan leader approached the terrors of a flight in a top-of-the-line U.S. Blackhawk helicopter. An American Special Forces captain, trained to kill in a dozen ways but now carrying the gift of a Kurdish elder's walking cane, gently took the leader by the hand as they stepped aboard the roaring hulk of metal, webbing and heavy machine guns.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Increasingly confident of allied promises to protect them, Kurdish refugees abandoned perilous mountain camps for haven in northern Iraq in dramatically growing numbers Friday, U.S. officials said. At the same time, allied troops peacefully secured new eastern areas of a sanctuary in Iraq next to the Turkish border in which no Iraqi military presence is permitted.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Scars run deep in this battered border town, but emerging from municipal pain and bitterness is an undeniable recognition that Zakhu is once again a good place in which to be a barber. Under an allied military umbrella, Kurdish refugees are returning in growing numbers from border camps to their homes in northern Iraq. Life is seeping back into Zakhu and surrounding villages. Grizzled veterans of a month in the mountains embrace on streets that yawned empty and fearful a week ago.
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