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December 9, 2001 | From Associated Press
Hearing faint pounding and moaning, an Irish trucker discovered the bodies of eight would-be refugees and five people clinging to life in his cargo Saturday. Police said they would mount a Europe-wide hunt for the traffickers. It was the first mass fatality involving asylum-seekers in Ireland, which in recent years has been targeted by rings that smuggle people from poorer countries.
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NEWS
December 9, 2001 | From Associated Press
Hearing faint pounding and moaning, an Irish trucker discovered the bodies of eight would-be refugees and five people clinging to life in his cargo Saturday. Police said they would mount a Europe-wide hunt for the traffickers. It was the first mass fatality involving asylum-seekers in Ireland, which in recent years has been targeted by rings that smuggle people from poorer countries.
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OPINION
July 4, 2006 | Richard Brookhiser, RICHARD BROOKHISER is the author of "What Would the Founders Do: Our Questions, Their Answers."
IF SUPERMAN CAN return to help us, why can't America's founders? It's true, Superman is alive and the founders are not. On the other hand, Superman is fictional, whereas Washington, Franklin, Jefferson, Hamilton and the rest were flesh-and-blood politicians, dealing with problems surprisingly similar to our own and establishing the laws and institutions we still use to confront those problems.
NEWS
May 25, 2001 | THOMAS CURWEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The land was ours," wrote the poet Robert Frost, "before we were the land's," but his vision, steeped in a moment of nationalism, brooked neither the pain of possession nor the ambivalence of belonging. One thousand miles north of Frost's granite and birch-covered landscapes, the terrains of Canadian writer Alistair MacLeod are more barren and wind-swept. Tenure, forged in duty and obligation, is less to be desired than endured.
BOOKS
December 2, 2001
This year, the Los Angeles Times considered more than 1,200 books. As we revisited those reviews, we concluded that our contributors reserved their highest praise for 82 novels and short story collections, 23 children's books, 25 mysteries and thrillers, 10 poetry titles, 13 books on the West and 85 works of nonfiction. Their original reviews have been edited and condensed. In addition, we have selected some of the year's best art books to illustrate the issue.
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