Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRefugees Italy
IN THE NEWS

Refugees Italy

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 19, 1989 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, Times Staff Writer
For a decade, this down-at-the-heels resort town northwest of Rome has served as a friendly staging point for emigre Soviet Jews headed to the United States. Now, with refugees arriving in unprecedented numbers, disillusionment washes Ladispoli's dour streets and polluted beaches. It is glasnost backlash.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 24, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the miserable camps and shelters for Kosovo refugees, the notorious scafisti who for years have spirited Albanian women across the Adriatic Sea to lives of prostitution have found lucrative new prey for their nocturnal crossings.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 9, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Police opened fire Thursday night as thousands of Albanian refugees seeking to avoid deportation tried to break out of a soccer stadium where they were being held under guard. Bari hospital workers said three refugees had been brought in with gunshot wounds. Two were in serious condition. Ten policemen also were injured.
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | Associated Press
Police on Monday offered Albanian refugees $40 each and new clothes if they go home, but many of the hundreds of remaining refugees promised to fight rather than return to Europe's poorest country. Soldiers set up tables with new shirts, trousers, shoes and mineral water to persuade the refugees to leave. Officials said those agreeing to abandon Italy received $40 each. Last week, up to 18,000 refugees came to Italy in the third such exodus in the last year.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | Reuters
Police fired tear gas and Albanian refugees set fire to three cars Saturday in clashes that broke out as Italy pressed ahead with the repatriation of the refugees. The incidents erupted at a soccer stadium where about 4,000 of the more than 10,000 who fled to this southern port city aboard a freighter Thursday are being held. At the Bari dockside, several Albanians were injured when police charged in to push them away from food supplies.
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | Associated Press
Police on Monday offered Albanian refugees $40 each and new clothes if they go home, but many of the hundreds of remaining refugees promised to fight rather than return to Europe's poorest country. Soldiers set up tables with new shirts, trousers, shoes and mineral water to persuade the refugees to leave. Officials said those agreeing to abandon Italy received $40 each. Last week, up to 18,000 refugees came to Italy in the third such exodus in the last year.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two Albanians were killed by gunfire and four were wounded aboard a fishing boat filled with refugees that reached Italy, port officials in Otranto, Italy, said. They quoted Albanians aboard the Delvina as saying Albanian coastal patrols fired on the boat shortly after it left for Italy. The Delvina, carrying about 30 refugees, was part of an armada of 50 fishing boats trying to make the 35-mile run across the Adriatic Sea to Italy.
NEWS
September 15, 1989 | MELISSA HEALY, Times Staff Writer
Atty. Gen. Dick Thornburgh, responding to congressional criticism of the Bush Administration's refugee policy, Thursday ordered immigration authorities to reopen the cases of 4,200 Soviet Jews in Italy whose applications for refugee status have been denied. "I want to make absolutely certain that each and every Soviet emigre who is eligible for admission to this country as a refugee is adjudicated as such," Thornburgh said in a letter to James L.
NEWS
August 10, 1991 | From Associated Press
Albanian refugees pelted police with rocks and bottles and made desperate dashes for freedom Friday as Italy began returning them to their impoverished homeland. Ferries and planes carrying more than 1,500 Albanians left this southern port on the 125-mile trip to the tiny Balkan nation, where reports said thousands of others were seeking passage abroad. Others were flown by military aircraft to Tirana, the Albanian capital.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international legion of bronzed backpackers braved vacation plans gone astray. Rail workers marshaled three of the longest trains ever seen in peacetime Europe. A platoon of Italian soldiers swapped its weapons for wire-cutters and weed-trimmers. A Calabrian bishop in the Italian boot hustled volunteer interpreters toward Brindisi from villages where Albanian has survived for centuries as a local dialect.
NEWS
August 12, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Act 3 in the heart-rending saga of Albanian refugees desperate for a better life limped to a climax in pathos, heat and violence at the southern Italian port of Bari on Sunday. But the curtain remains explosively open.
NEWS
August 11, 1991 | Reuters
Police fired tear gas and Albanian refugees set fire to three cars Saturday in clashes that broke out as Italy pressed ahead with the repatriation of the refugees. The incidents erupted at a soccer stadium where about 4,000 of the more than 10,000 who fled to this southern port city aboard a freighter Thursday are being held. At the Bari dockside, several Albanians were injured when police charged in to push them away from food supplies.
NEWS
August 10, 1991 | From Associated Press
Albanian refugees pelted police with rocks and bottles and made desperate dashes for freedom Friday as Italy began returning them to their impoverished homeland. Ferries and planes carrying more than 1,500 Albanians left this southern port on the 125-mile trip to the tiny Balkan nation, where reports said thousands of others were seeking passage abroad. Others were flown by military aircraft to Tirana, the Albanian capital.
NEWS
August 9, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Police opened fire Thursday night as thousands of Albanian refugees seeking to avoid deportation tried to break out of a soccer stadium where they were being held under guard. Bari hospital workers said three refugees had been brought in with gunshot wounds. Two were in serious condition. Ten policemen also were injured.
NEWS
June 13, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two Albanians were killed by gunfire and four were wounded aboard a fishing boat filled with refugees that reached Italy, port officials in Otranto, Italy, said. They quoted Albanians aboard the Delvina as saying Albanian coastal patrols fired on the boat shortly after it left for Italy. The Delvina, carrying about 30 refugees, was part of an armada of 50 fishing boats trying to make the 35-mile run across the Adriatic Sea to Italy.
NEWS
March 11, 1991 | Associated Press
At least 1,500 Albanians sailed for home after frustrating days without food or shelter in Italy. About 18,000 Albanian refugees remained, hoping to avoid being deported. Police in this port city broke up several scuffles among men crowded on the docks, where many refugees slept in the rain over the weekend. A man who described himself as a leader of those returning said: "We did not find freedom and a friendly welcome, but the police on our arrival. We have been left without food for days."
NEWS
August 12, 1991 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Act 3 in the heart-rending saga of Albanian refugees desperate for a better life limped to a climax in pathos, heat and violence at the southern Italian port of Bari on Sunday. But the curtain remains explosively open.
NEWS
May 24, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the miserable camps and shelters for Kosovo refugees, the notorious scafisti who for years have spirited Albanian women across the Adriatic Sea to lives of prostitution have found lucrative new prey for their nocturnal crossings.
NEWS
July 14, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The repressive curtain around Europe's most backward society was flicked aside revealingly Friday for the first time in 45 years as about 4,000 grimy but exuberant Albanians streamed ashore here to new lives in Western refuge. The refugees emerged almost trance-like from an internationally sponsored boatlift that transported them from a homeland wrapped in stubborn Stalinist isolation since the end of World War II. "We worked, the Communist leaders ate.
NEWS
July 13, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international legion of bronzed backpackers braved vacation plans gone astray. Rail workers marshaled three of the longest trains ever seen in peacetime Europe. A platoon of Italian soldiers swapped its weapons for wire-cutters and weed-trimmers. A Calabrian bishop in the Italian boot hustled volunteer interpreters toward Brindisi from villages where Albanian has survived for centuries as a local dialect.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|