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Refugees Japan

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NEWS
December 21, 1989 | From The Washington Post
The Japanese government has announced it will begin repatriating Chinese "boat people" and said the first 301 will be sent back today. Foreign Ministry spokesman Taizo Watanabe said the 301 are among 1,668 Chinese who illegally entered Japan this year by posing as Vietnamese "boat people." Most came seeking employment in prosperous Japan and cannot be considered genuine political refugees, Japanese officials said.
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NEWS
December 28, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's efforts over the last decade to open its shores to Indochinese refugees have hardly been something to boast about, particularly for a country that has vowed to assume the burdens of global leadership. When the industrialized nations of the West were inundated with hundreds of thousands of "boat people" in the late 1970s, Japanese officials announced that they would take a mere 500 for permanent resettlement on these crowded, "racially homogenous" islands.
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NEWS
December 28, 1990 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's efforts over the last decade to open its shores to Indochinese refugees have hardly been something to boast about, particularly for a country that has vowed to assume the burdens of global leadership. When the industrialized nations of the West were inundated with hundreds of thousands of "boat people" in the late 1970s, Japanese officials announced that they would take a mere 500 for permanent resettlement on these crowded, "racially homogenous" islands.
NEWS
December 21, 1989 | From The Washington Post
The Japanese government has announced it will begin repatriating Chinese "boat people" and said the first 301 will be sent back today. Foreign Ministry spokesman Taizo Watanabe said the 301 are among 1,668 Chinese who illegally entered Japan this year by posing as Vietnamese "boat people." Most came seeking employment in prosperous Japan and cannot be considered genuine political refugees, Japanese officials said.
NEWS
December 5, 1989 | Reuters
Japan will send about 300 Chinese "boat people" back to their homeland later this month, the Foreign Ministry said Monday. Beijing had agreed to accept the Chinese to be sent aboard a Chinese-chartered ship, a ministry spokesman said. Since last May, 3,110 Chinese refugees have arrived in Japan claiming to be Vietnamese refugees, the spokesman said.
WORLD
April 7, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
A Japanese activist arrested in China four months ago for allegedly helping North Korean defectors has been indicted on people-trafficking charges, a member of his group said. Takayuki Noguchi, 32, was taken into custody in the southern Chinese city of Nanning on Dec. 10 with an interpreter and two North Korean defectors. Hiroshi Kato, leader of the Tokyo-based Life Funds for North Korean Refugees, said Japan's Foreign Ministry had confirmed the indictment.
NEWS
May 30, 1989
A small wooden boat carrying 107 Vietnamese refugees landed on an uninhabited island in southwestern Japan after a 40-day voyage, officials said. It was the first time since 1977 that a Vietnamese refugee boat had reached Japan directly from Vietnam, the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in Japan said. An official of Japan's Maritime Safety Agency said 71 men, 22 women and 14 children were aboard the boat that landed at Biryo Island, 48 miles west of Sasebo. All of the refugees were reported to be in satisfactory condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1990 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
UC San Diego Professor Chalmers Johnson said Wednesday that rewriting the U. S.-Japan Security Treaty was "the only way to prevent genuine Japanese rearmament." In a speech at the Foreign Correspondents Club of Japan, Johnson called the treaty and its provisions establishing an "American protectorate over Japan" an anachronism rooted in conditions of the 1950s that no longer exist.
WORLD
March 18, 2011 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
Japan's top government spokesman said Friday that the country's leadership was overwhelmed by last week's earthquake and tsunami, which slowed its ability to respond to the following humanitarian crisis and nuclear emergency. "The unprecedented scale of the earthquake and tsunami that struck Japan, frankly speaking, were among many things that happened that had not been anticipated under our disaster management contingency plans," Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano said, according to the Associated Press.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2010 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Andy Albeck, a former longtime United Artists executive whose tenure as president and chief executive in the late 1970s and early '80s was clouded by the high-profile failure of the epic western "Heaven's Gate," has died. He was 89. Albeck died of heart failure Sept. 29 at NYU Langone Medical Center in New York City, said his son, Johannes. In a 30-year career at United Artists that included serving as president of UA's broadcasting division and senior vice president of operations, Albeck was appointed the company's president and chief executive in 1978.
NEWS
December 5, 1989 | Reuters
Japan will send about 300 Chinese "boat people" back to their homeland later this month, the Foreign Ministry said Monday. Beijing had agreed to accept the Chinese to be sent aboard a Chinese-chartered ship, a ministry spokesman said. Since last May, 3,110 Chinese refugees have arrived in Japan claiming to be Vietnamese refugees, the spokesman said.
NEWS
March 3, 1992 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what they call their first postwar test in international diplomacy, Japanese officials are pushing to play the leading role in rebuilding devastated Cambodia. Far away from the Southeast Asian nation, in the heart of Tokyo's Kasumigaseki government complex, Foreign Ministry bureaucrats pore over studies, plot out aid schemes and dream of leading a nation ripped apart by genocide and war into a new century of peace and prosperity. As hundreds of thousands of Cambodian refugees prepare to head home, and U.N. "blue helmets" launch the largest peacekeeping operation in the organization's history, the Japanese say they are focusing on Cambodia's long-term reconstruction.
NEWS
April 2, 2006 | Kana Inagaki, Associated Press Writer
Last year, Japan's contribution to the United Nations refugee agency was second only to the United States, underlining its years of support for people in need. Yet, although it has been quick to help refugees abroad, Japan has long taken a tough line on letting them come to its own shores. According to the Ministry of Justice, Japan granted refugee status to 46 people last year -- and that was up from 15 in 2004. Meanwhile, the U.S. took in 21,148 refugees and France accepted 15,866 in 2004.
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