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Refugees Jordan

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NEWS
September 5, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before dawn Tuesday, a cargo plane from the United States brought 500 tents to Jordan. Along with another 500 brought in from a U.N. warehouse in Italy, they were trucked to a stretch of desert near Jordan's frontier with Iraq. By this afternoon, the 1,000 tents should be bursting with refugees from Kuwait and Iraq. But by then, another 5,000 or 10,000 or 20,000 new refugees will have streamed into Jordan from Iraq with nothing to eat or drink and nowhere to sleep.
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NEWS
February 14, 1992 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saleh was once a janitor in a bank in Kuwait, but since being driven from his home in May and arriving in Jordan, he has been unable to find a replacement for that job, low-paying as it is. "Even bankers are willing to take a job as a janitor," Saleh said. "Everyone is willing to sweep floors. Right now, Jordan is probably the world capital of floor sweepers."
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NEWS
September 9, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aid is lagging to ten of thousands of Asian refugees from Kuwait marooned in perilous desert camps here while out-of-sync international relief agencies and the hard-pressed Jordanian government grapple with one another and a crisis whose magnitude has overwhelmed them. Organizational structures and relief supply lines are emerging after a belated start, but most of the refugees still lack basic necessities, relief specialists and Jordanian officials complained in interviews.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Jordanian government reopened its border with Iraq on Friday, inviting a refugee exodus fraught with danger in the middle of a war. Nine days after closing the crossing for lack of international financial support, Jordan announced that it would take in refugees of all nationalities fleeing Iraq and Kuwait. Jordanian officials estimated that more than a million people might make the run for the border.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Listless men and women clad in sarongs lay under pale-green and sand-colored tents Tuesday, seeking relief from the pitiless sun. A few compatriots gathered silently around a single hose to fill cans with water to douse their unquenchable thirst. Across a highway, a dozen men stripped to bathe among the bulrushes in a soupy canal that runs off the Tigris River. A pair of youths dragged the canal with a piece of cloth, hoping in vain to catch a fish.
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 50,000 Asian refugees from Kuwait are trapped in desperation on a scorched patch of desert near the Iraqi border here, short of food, water and hope. Awaiting elusive repatriation, their companions are fear, boredom, asphyxiating red tape and the specter of epidemic. There is no shade. By day, thirsty refugees from a half dozen countries bake under a merciless sun and 100-degree temperatures. There are few tents.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with angry outcries, the United Nations on Thursday acknowledged shortcomings in the distribution of relief to tens of thousands of refugees stranded in Jordan, but a prominent U.S. relief official predicted that the worst problems will be overcome in a couple of weeks.
NEWS
August 31, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A growing number of Asian countries, forced to deal with thousands of impoverished refugees and financial losses of a billion dollars or more, are beginning to question the hard line the United States and other Western countries are taking in the Persian Gulf crisis, according to diplomats and other officials here.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Jordanian government Wednesday reported a sharp drop in the number of Asian refugees from Kuwait awaiting repatriation, but wrangling continued between the government and international relief organizations amid warnings of another huge wave of refugees massing in Iraq. Updating numbers that have been as inconstant as shifting desert sands since the Asian workers began arriving after Iraq's invasion of Kuwait on Aug.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Western women and children who had been detained in Kuwait and Iraq continued leaving in small groups Wednesday, while hundreds more waited anxiously for the government's permission to leave. At least three flights carrying more than 150 Westerners from Iraq landed Wednesday in Amman. A French-chartered Iraqi Airways jetliner arrived with 144 women and children and one Italian man.
NEWS
January 14, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An icy wind blew through the director's tent as Thaher Hadid spoke of the prospect of a human disaster looming just beyond his desert outpost, a mass of 1,548 mostly vacant canvas tents known as Azraq I evacuation camp. Here, he explained during the weekend, more than 1 million Asians, Egyptians, Sudanese and other Third World workers fleeing Kuwait after Iraq's invasion took refuge after Aug. 2, stretching the compassion of Hadid's nation and the rest of the world last fall.
NEWS
October 7, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
International relief officials Saturday proclaimed a virtual end to the two-month refugee crisis in Jordan while they begin to make plans for potentially larger numbers of refugees should war break out in the Persian Gulf. There were still about 37,000 Asian refugees in well-ordered tent encampments in Jordan, but they are being moved out at the rate of about 7,000 a day, representatives of the U.N. Disaster Relief Office (UNDRO) said Saturday.
NEWS
September 15, 1990 | Reuters
Air Lanka said Friday that it would operate about 15 flights a week to bring back thousands of Sri Lankans stranded in Jordan because of the Persian Gulf crisis. A government official said there are 9,900 Sri Lankans in refugee camps in Jordan.
NEWS
September 13, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Jordanian government Wednesday reported a sharp drop in the number of Asian refugees from Kuwait awaiting repatriation, but wrangling continued between the government and international relief organizations amid warnings of another huge wave of refugees massing in Iraq. Updating numbers that have been as inconstant as shifting desert sands since the Asian workers began arriving after Iraq's invasion of Kuwait on Aug.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Homeward bound, Mohammed Abdul Majid Dewan arrived in Amman on Tuesday laden with mixed emotions and not much else at the end of the first leg of a dangerous, exhausting and bittersweet odyssey through the convulsed Middle East. "I have no gifts for my family, but I am thinking they will understand," Dewan, 24, said in the dusty bus carrying him from a refugee camp to the airport and a long flight home to love and uncertainty in Dhaka, Bangladesh.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Listless men and women clad in sarongs lay under pale-green and sand-colored tents Tuesday, seeking relief from the pitiless sun. A few compatriots gathered silently around a single hose to fill cans with water to douse their unquenchable thirst. Across a highway, a dozen men stripped to bathe among the bulrushes in a soupy canal that runs off the Tigris River. A pair of youths dragged the canal with a piece of cloth, hoping in vain to catch a fish.
NEWS
September 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
Cries for help by tens of thousands of hungry Asians stranded in Jordan after fleeing Kuwait are finally being heard by other nations, but there still were concerns Wednesday that the aid could come too late. The multitudes, now living in makeshift desert camps, are fighting for food and water, and many are on the verge of starvation. Jordan's Crown Prince Hassan chided the international community earlier this week for its slow response to his government's pleas for aid.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Homeward bound, Mohammed Abdul Majid Dewan arrived in Amman on Tuesday laden with mixed emotions and not much else at the end of the first leg of a dangerous, exhausting and bittersweet odyssey through the convulsed Middle East. "I have no gifts for my family, but I am thinking they will understand," Dewan, 24, said in the dusty bus carrying him from a refugee camp to the airport and a long flight home to love and uncertainty in Dhaka, Bangladesh.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last Thursday afternoon, construction of a huge transit camp here to house 35,000 Asian refugees from Kuwait, originally planned for a weekend opening, was far behind schedule but moving along nicely. Bulldozers had carved geometric lanes and squares through the rocky desert, water pipe waited to be laid, sweating Red Cross officials had erected 168 tents and hundreds more were ready for assembly.
NEWS
September 10, 1990 | Reuters
With tens of thousands of its nationals stranded in the Middle East since Iraq occupied Kuwait, Bangladesh has begun sending food, water and medicine to refugees in Jordan, officials said Sunday. They said the airlift was ordered by President Hussain Mohammed Ershad, who is due to leave for Turkey on Wednesday to meet Bangladeshi refugees stranded there. A Foreign Office spokesman said that more than half the estimated 75,000 Bangladesh nationals in Kuwait have already left.
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