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Refugees Kenya

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NEWS
July 12, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A leading political dissident who had taken refuge in the U.S. Embassy here from a government crackdown last week left the country late Wednesday under U.S. auspices, the embassy said. Gibson Kamau Kuria, 43, a lawyer, was one of the most prominent opposition figures still at large after a police roundup of proponents of a multi-party system here when he sought temporary asylum in the embassy and asked for assistance in leaving the country.
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NEWS
July 12, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A leading political dissident who had taken refuge in the U.S. Embassy here from a government crackdown last week left the country late Wednesday under U.S. auspices, the embassy said. Gibson Kamau Kuria, 43, a lawyer, was one of the most prominent opposition figures still at large after a police roundup of proponents of a multi-party system here when he sought temporary asylum in the embassy and asked for assistance in leaving the country.
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NEWS
March 30, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not very long ago that members of this country's sizable ethnic Somali community believed that years of discrimination and harassment by the black African majority had come to an end. "Things were better than (at) any time in memory," said one prominent Somali here. No more.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was not very long ago that members of this country's sizable ethnic Somali community believed that years of discrimination and harassment by the black African majority had come to an end. "Things were better than (at) any time in memory," said one prominent Somali here. No more.
NEWS
December 8, 1992 | Reuters
Ethiopia and Kenya have shut their land borders with Somalia to try to keep out gunmen who may retreat as a U.S.-led multinational force arrives, diplomatic officials said Monday. A spokesman for the U.N. High Commission for Refugees in Kenya said: "We are not unhappy with the border closures because we understand the security implications. Obviously we would like borders reopened soon so that refugees can move freely."
NEWS
October 9, 1993 | TAMMERLIN DRUMMOND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1991, when famine and civil war raged in Somalia, boatloads of refugees sailed down the Somali coast to neighboring Kenya seeking political asylum. Others--an average of 900 a day--trooped across the border on foot, many of them after trekking through the bush for months. At first, Kenyans embraced their uprooted neighbors. In partnership with the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, the government allotted land for more than a dozen camps.
NEWS
May 4, 2001 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Human rights lawyers are considering legal action against a proposed government policy to turn back refugees at South Africa's borders. The lawyers accuse the government of violating the nation's Refugee Act and international conventions protecting the rights of displaced people. They also maintain that such an order would endanger the lives of people fleeing wars in other parts of Africa and would further expose South Africa to criticisms of xenophobia.
WORLD
April 9, 2009 | Edmund Sanders and Julian E. Barnes
With a U.S. warship on site keeping watch early today, Somali pirates and American seamen engaged in a standoff on the high seas after the crew of a freighter loaded with food for Africa fought off the hijackers -- who fled in a lifeboat with the captain as a hostage. The assault on the U.S.- registered Maersk Alabama cargo ship far off Somalia's coast marked the first attack against a U.S.
NATIONAL
July 7, 2003 | Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar, Times Staff Writer
Good news for My Thi Huynh came at the end of April. A refugee from Vietnam, the 75-year-old widow had persevered to win approval for her children to come from Ho Chi Minh City to California, and they were finally listed for a flight. Two weeks later, everything came apart. For reasons never explained, she said, the U.S. government ordered a new round of security checks on her three sons, who survive as street vendors under a Communist government that considers them politically suspect.
NEWS
August 11, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 150 trucks were lined up in front of a makeshift partition of rusting sea containers closing off one end of the port of this crippled, starving capital. Armed men acting--or just posing--as security guards were everywhere, chatting, arguing or shouting at one another in familiar Somali style. Suddenly, an encounter turned ugly. The hubbub raised an octave; one man was shoved against a container.
OPINION
August 23, 1992 | Nancy Yoshihara, Nancy Yoshihara is an editorial writer for The Times. She interviewed Sadako Ogata when the high commissioner visited Los Angeles
In the months since assuming her post as U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, Sadako Ogata has faced one crisis after another. Recently, the bitter ethnic fighting in the former Yugoslavia has created Europe's worst refugee crisis since the end of World War II--displacing 2.2 million people.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 2002 | WADE MAJOR
Anyone paying attention to the recent foreign film scene has probably noticed a decidedly Teutonic streak in the offerings. Normally distributed sparingly in the U.S., German films are suddenly in vogue, with several current releases--"Mostly Martha," "Das Experiment" and the English-language "Invincible"--giving art-house audiences their richest exposure to contemporary German cinema in decades. And that's only the beginning. Come November, 10 more new German films will receive U.S.
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