Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRefugees Kuwait
IN THE NEWS

Refugees Kuwait

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
September 17, 1990 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A convoy of overloaded Mercedes-Benzes, BMWs and Chevrolets streamed across the border into Saudi Arabia on Sunday as thousands of Kuwaitis rushed for a newly opened border station amid a growing atmosphere of panic in the Kuwaiti capital.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 14, 1992 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saleh was once a janitor in a bank in Kuwait, but since being driven from his home in May and arriving in Jordan, he has been unable to find a replacement for that job, low-paying as it is. "Even bankers are willing to take a job as a janitor," Saleh said. "Everyone is willing to sweep floors. Right now, Jordan is probably the world capital of floor sweepers."
Advertisement
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Kuwaiti government is coming under increasing pressure to grant thousands of Arabs stranded in a squalid border camp permission to return to their homes in Kuwait. The refugees are part of a minority known as the bidoun, stateless Arabs who descended from nomadic desert tribes and lived in Kuwait but who were never recognized as citizens under the law.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1991 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush announced a four-year reprieve Friday for hundreds of Kuwaiti residents who were evacuated to the United States last year during the Iraqi occupation of Kuwait but faced possible deportation from this country after the expiration of their temporary visas in December. The presidential order, similar to one issued for Chinese students after the Tian An Men Square crackdown in 1989, will allow most of the former Kuwait residents to live and work in the United States until Jan.
NEWS
February 18, 1991 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A shower of black rain fell along the Iranian frontier Sunday as allied warplanes continued pounding the southern Iraqi city of Basra and surrounding oil facilities. The phenomenon, a mixture of natural moisture and smoke from petroleum fires, began falling Sunday morning in Iran's Ilam province, according to a Tehran dispatch of the Iranian national news agency. Black rain, it reported, "has polluted the environment, water and agricultural resources in the region."
NEWS
September 4, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 50,000 Asian refugees from Kuwait are trapped in desperation on a scorched patch of desert near the Iraqi border here, short of food, water and hope. Awaiting elusive repatriation, their companions are fear, boredom, asphyxiating red tape and the specter of epidemic. There is no shade. By day, thirsty refugees from a half dozen countries bake under a merciless sun and 100-degree temperatures. There are few tents.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with angry outcries, the United Nations on Thursday acknowledged shortcomings in the distribution of relief to tens of thousands of refugees stranded in Jordan, but a prominent U.S. relief official predicted that the worst problems will be overcome in a couple of weeks.
NEWS
November 1, 1990 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
A month ago, the Biggest Show in the Middle East was playing Amman, with high-wire drama and eye-catching color filling every inch of the tent: In Ring No. 1, the tragic spectacle of tens of thousands of Asian refugees from Kuwait and Iraq, swarming for food and shelter in pitiful camps on the Jordanian desert. In Ring 2, Saddamania, the magical explosion of popular support for the Iraqi president.
NEWS
August 23, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overwhelmed by a dramatic wave of refugees fleeing Kuwait, Jordan suddenly closed its borders to them Wednesday night, even as help was reported on the way in the form of a European-sponsored airlift for stranded Egyptians. The closure came as King Hussein, the Jordanian leader, announced that 42,000 refugees, most of them Egyptian migrant workers, had entered Jordan by way of Iraq and Saudi Arabia on Wednesday alone. About 185,000 people have arrived since the invasion of Kuwait on Aug.
NEWS
September 5, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before dawn Tuesday, a cargo plane from the United States brought 500 tents to Jordan. Along with another 500 brought in from a U.N. warehouse in Italy, they were trucked to a stretch of desert near Jordan's frontier with Iraq. By this afternoon, the 1,000 tents should be bursting with refugees from Kuwait and Iraq. But by then, another 5,000 or 10,000 or 20,000 new refugees will have streamed into Jordan from Iraq with nothing to eat or drink and nowhere to sleep.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a month of terror under staccato artillery fire and prowling Iraqi soldiers, Dr. Iyad Alshurafa and his family jumped at the chance to flee Kuwait aboard a U.S. evacuation flight in the early weeks of the Persian Gulf War. They owed their escape to their youngest child, 7-year-old Nabil, a U.S. citizen who ensured the family a spot on the U.S. "freedom flights" from occupied Kuwait.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1991 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gloria Arqueta, a Los Angeles high school student who has lived here illegally for three years, has virtually no memory of her native El Salvador except for her parents' nightmarish stories. For many of her 17 years, she and her family wandered through Central America, searching for a safe haven from the civil war that has ravaged their country. "I just hear that children are being killed, burned to death, and they don't know why," she said. "I won't go back."
NEWS
July 29, 1991 | JAMES FLANIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This port city, which has been damaged in two wars and a brief rebellion immediately after the Gulf War, continues to be a flash point for this region's troubles as well as a haven for its dispossessed. About 80 refugees from Iran walk in almost every day through Tununa, a section of Basra that was a trench-filled no-man's-land during the eight-year Iran-Iraq War. They are former Iraqi prisoners of that war or Iraqi civilians dispossessed during it. They receive help from the U.N.
NEWS
June 12, 1991 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an apparent violation of an international agreement it signed in March, Kuwait forcibly repatriated at least 36 Iraqi civilians on Tuesday. The internees, including 11 women and six children, were taken from an immigration detention center in Kuwait city where about 600 people are reportedly awaiting deportation. They were loaded onto two buses bound for the border town of Abdaly, where they were to be marched across the no-man's-land into Safwan, Iraq.
NEWS
May 20, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Kuwaiti government is coming under increasing pressure to grant thousands of Arabs stranded in a squalid border camp permission to return to their homes in Kuwait. The refugees are part of a minority known as the bidoun, stateless Arabs who descended from nomadic desert tribes and lived in Kuwait but who were never recognized as citizens under the law.
NEWS
May 14, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With departures of "boat people" from northern Vietnam once again swelling, refugee officials contend that a proposal by an Orange County congressman to resettle Vietnamese in Kuwait appears to have turned the exodus into a genuine flood. Like a medieval Asian folk tale, reports of the resettlement idea have been embroidered and passed on throughout Vietnam, spinning mythic visions of riches in the Middle East as well as the prospect of resettlement abroad.
NEWS
August 24, 1990 | DANIEL WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of refugees stranded in a vast no man's land between the border posts of Jordan and Iraq struggled to continue their arduous journey Thursday in the face of intense heat, a lack of water and food and the tie-up of a border that has been ordered closed. Jordan officially closed its border at midnight Wednesday because huge numbers of refugees, mainly Egyptian, were stacking up at its southern port, Aqaba, for lack of ships to take them away.
NEWS
September 9, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aid is lagging to ten of thousands of Asian refugees from Kuwait marooned in perilous desert camps here while out-of-sync international relief agencies and the hard-pressed Jordanian government grapple with one another and a crisis whose magnitude has overwhelmed them. Organizational structures and relief supply lines are emerging after a belated start, but most of the refugees still lack basic necessities, relief specialists and Jordanian officials complained in interviews.
NEWS
May 11, 1991 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A freshly hung portrait of Saddam Hussein smiled down from a battle-scarred wall in this tense and desolate border town Friday as international observers pronounced the region free of military armed forces for the first time since the Persian Gulf War. Scarcely 48 hours after U.S. troops withdrew from southern Iraq, Safwan is being pulled back under the control of Iraqi authorities. The transition is not smooth.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|