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Refugees Laos

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1995 | JOHN POPE
The royal family of Laos, whose members have lived in exile in France for the past 20 years, toured Westminster on Monday as part of a West Coast visit to study how Laotian refugees are adapting to American life. The U.S. visit is the second for Prince Sauryavong Savang and the first for his wife, Princess Daravan Savang, and their son, Sourivong Savang.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1995 | JOHN POPE
The royal family of Laos, whose members have lived in exile in France for the past 20 years, toured Westminster on Monday as part of a West Coast visit to study how Laotian refugees are adapting to American life. The U.S. visit is the second for Prince Sauryavong Savang and the first for his wife, Princess Daravan Savang, and their son, Sourivong Savang.
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NEWS
March 20, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Thai officials Thursday denied breaching the rights of hill people from Laos and challenged the United States to accept more refugees after Washington charged Bangkok with serious violations of refugee human rights over its handling of Hmong tribesmen. William A. Brown, U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1993 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Asian refugee agency has been put on probation because an audit by its major funder has found that it mismanaged its funds and billed taxpayers for services it never provided. The auditors also described programs managed by the as "disorganized and non-functional," noting that its employees spent large amounts of time aimlessly driving mentally disabled patients around the county so that it could bill taxpayers for transportation costs.
NEWS
March 3, 1989
Thailand has forced Laotians fleeing Communist persecution back to their homeland, where "hundreds, if not thousands" of them have died, a U.S. human rights group said in a report issued in Bangkok. The Lawyers Committee for Human Rights cited two cases in November, 1987, in which Laotian soldiers allegedly massacred groups of 33 and 16 Laotians just after they were evicted from Thai soil.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 1993 | DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Asian refugee agency has been put on probation because an audit by its major funder has found that it mismanaged its funds and billed taxpayers for services it never provided. The auditors also described programs managed by the as "disorganized and non-functional," noting that its employees spent large amounts of time aimlessly driving mentally disabled patients around the county so that it could bill taxpayers for transportation costs.
NEWS
August 24, 1992 | ALAN C. MILLER and STU GLAUBERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Puongpun Sananikone is fond of quoting a Chinese aphorism: "Out of misfortune good things come." Now, the international management consultant is striving to make it apply to the war-scarred country that he reluctantly fled 17 years ago. Sananikone, a member of one of Laos' most prominent industrial families, came to the United States in 1975 to avoid detention in a hard-labor "re-education camp" by the new Communist regime.
NEWS
June 5, 1986 | United Press International
Pope John Paul II has awarded the Vatican's $150,000 international peace prize to a Thai Catholic relief group who cares for refugees in Southeast Asia. The pontiff awarded the Pope John XXIII Peace Prize to the Catholic Office for Emergency Relief and Refugees run by Thailand's local bishops conference. The group helps refugees from Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam and Burma.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | Associated Press
Five school board members who approved a plan to bus Asian students into mostly white grade schools were ousted in a recall election. The five people who beat them Tuesday had promised to reverse the plan. About 16% of the district's 8,800 students are children of Hmong refugees from Laos who settled in the area after the Vietnam War. The busing plan was approved, 6 to 3, in June and took effect this fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 28, 1999
Deadlines drive federal welfare reform, and appropriately so. Time limits carrying the threat of financial penalties against the states give needed urgency to reducing the welfare population. But an unreasonable goal--that 75% of two-parent welfare families get off the rolls in one fiscal year--has combined with California's special circumstances to produce an impossible burden. A pending $7-million federal penalty against the state should be waived.
NEWS
August 24, 1992 | ALAN C. MILLER and STU GLAUBERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Puongpun Sananikone is fond of quoting a Chinese aphorism: "Out of misfortune good things come." Now, the international management consultant is striving to make it apply to the war-scarred country that he reluctantly fled 17 years ago. Sananikone, a member of one of Laos' most prominent industrial families, came to the United States in 1975 to avoid detention in a hard-labor "re-education camp" by the new Communist regime.
NEWS
March 3, 1989
Thailand has forced Laotians fleeing Communist persecution back to their homeland, where "hundreds, if not thousands" of them have died, a U.S. human rights group said in a report issued in Bangkok. The Lawyers Committee for Human Rights cited two cases in November, 1987, in which Laotian soldiers allegedly massacred groups of 33 and 16 Laotians just after they were evicted from Thai soil.
NEWS
March 20, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Thai officials Thursday denied breaching the rights of hill people from Laos and challenged the United States to accept more refugees after Washington charged Bangkok with serious violations of refugee human rights over its handling of Hmong tribesmen. William A. Brown, U.S.
NEWS
May 19, 1988 | E.A. WAYNE
The continued flow of refugees out of Indochina exemplifies many of the problems faced by the United States and other international donors. Thailand, for example, has provided temporary shelter for nearly a million Indochinese refugees in the last 13 years. But as the influx continues and the United States and other countries accept fewer refugees for resettlement, Thai attitudes have hardened.
NEWS
October 20, 1997 | MICHAEL HARRIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In 1982, a 3-month-old Hmong girl with severe epilepsy was carried in her mother's arms to the county hospital in Merced, a San Joaquin Valley farm town where the Hmong, refugees from Laos, now make up a fifth of the population. The girl, Lia Lee, had stopped seizing but had breathed vomit into her lungs; the doctor on duty diagnosed her ailment as pneumonia. The mother, Foua, couldn't correct him. She spoke no English, and no interpreter was available.
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