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Refugees Liberia

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NEWS
July 31, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Troops loyal to Liberian President Samuel K. Doe massacred at least 600 refugees, including babies in their mothers' arms, in the sanctuary of a church where they had fled for safety in war-torn Monrovia, witnesses said Monday. State Department officials in Washington said late Monday that their information, based on reports from U.S. Embassy staff members still in Monrovia, put the death toll closer to 200.
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NEWS
June 16, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Aid workers scouring the Atlantic coast of Africa from a light plane failed to spot a Russian ship carrying 450 refugees from the war in Liberia that had been barred from ports for 18 days. They estimated that the refugees must have run out of water after the vessel was last supplied Monday. A spokesman for Doctors Without Borders, which organized the search, said: "We can only hope for the sake of the passengers that it is in some small port."
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NEWS
February 15, 1994 | Reuters
Thousands of refugees have fled fighting between two Liberian rebel groups and are now crammed into the port of Buchanan, relief workers said. Between 6,000 and 7,000 people are squeezed into the port's two-story Louisa Hotel. Others have taken over homes abandoned earlier by residents who are now returning to find them occupied.
NEWS
May 14, 1996 | From Associated Press
A rusty freighter seeking a port of refuge for thousands of sick and weary Liberian refugees fleeing factional fighting was forced out to sea yet again Monday after restocking urgently needed food and medical supplies in Ghana. Ghanaian authorities would not let the 3,000 to 4,000 refugees disembark, although eight seriously ill people were allowed off. Two of them were hospitalized in critical condition.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A freighter with thousands of refugees fleeing war in Liberia was forced back to sea after passengers were fed and given medical care in Ghana, port officials said. Medical workers said they found two bodies from a shooting incident on the freighter, which docked in Ghana after a week at sea with no port willing to admit the refugees. Details of the shooting incident were not clear.
NEWS
May 11, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Ivory Coast officials, fearing a new wave of refugees, forced thousands of tired and hungry Liberians back to open waters despite concerns that their leaky ship is not seaworthy, the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said. "We are very worried about the 4,000 Liberians on the boat," agency spokeswoman Christiane Berthiaume said. "The conditions on the boat are appalling. The boat is damaged."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1991 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gloria Arqueta, a Los Angeles high school student who has lived here illegally for three years, has virtually no memory of her native El Salvador except for her parents' nightmarish stories. For many of her 17 years, she and her family wandered through Central America, searching for a safe haven from the civil war that has ravaged their country. "I just hear that children are being killed, burned to death, and they don't know why," she said. "I won't go back."
NEWS
May 14, 1996 | From Associated Press
A rusty freighter seeking a port of refuge for thousands of sick and weary Liberian refugees fleeing factional fighting was forced out to sea yet again Monday after restocking urgently needed food and medical supplies in Ghana. Ghanaian authorities would not let the 3,000 to 4,000 refugees disembark, although eight seriously ill people were allowed off. Two of them were hospitalized in critical condition.
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Liberians fleeing their country's civil war aboard a damaged freighter will not be allowed entry into Ghana, U.N. and Ghanaian officials said Saturday. "Only Ghanaians, U.N. officials, aid workers and foreign nationals seeking transit through Ghana will be allowed to disembark," the U.N. refugee agency's representative in Accra, Chrysantus Ache, told Ghana News Agency.
NEWS
August 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
Government troops mounted a successful counterattack Sunday, dashing rebel hopes of seizing the capital before a West African task force arrives to impose peace. Troops also fired on civilians, and refugees said that at least 18 were killed. Bodies of refugees and pieces of clothing from their bundles of belongings were seen scattered in the streets.
NEWS
May 13, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
A freighter with thousands of refugees fleeing war in Liberia was forced back to sea after passengers were fed and given medical care in Ghana, port officials said. Medical workers said they found two bodies from a shooting incident on the freighter, which docked in Ghana after a week at sea with no port willing to admit the refugees. Details of the shooting incident were not clear.
NEWS
May 12, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
Liberians fleeing their country's civil war aboard a damaged freighter will not be allowed entry into Ghana, U.N. and Ghanaian officials said Saturday. "Only Ghanaians, U.N. officials, aid workers and foreign nationals seeking transit through Ghana will be allowed to disembark," the U.N. refugee agency's representative in Accra, Chrysantus Ache, told Ghana News Agency.
NEWS
May 11, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Ivory Coast officials, fearing a new wave of refugees, forced thousands of tired and hungry Liberians back to open waters despite concerns that their leaky ship is not seaworthy, the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said. "We are very worried about the 4,000 Liberians on the boat," agency spokeswoman Christiane Berthiaume said. "The conditions on the boat are appalling. The boat is damaged."
NEWS
May 6, 1996 | From Associated Press
Clouds of dark smoke billowed over this city Sunday as 2,500 Liberian refugees stood on the deck of a freighter, sadly singing a patriotic hymn and waving farewell as the ship inched away from the burning capital. Back on the streets, Monrovia was consumed by violence. Young fighters set dozens of homes and buildings on fire Sunday.
NEWS
April 17, 1996 | SUDARSAN RAGHAVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Inside the kitchen of the U.S. Embassy in this battle-scarred West African capital, members of five different ethnic groups are working side by side. One Liberian pours pancake batter into a pan and hands it to the cook. Another is taking inventory. To his right, a man is writing up a receipt. To his left, the cashier is ringing up a bill. Together, they run the kitchen as smooth as grease--and nobody is quarreling.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fighters are too weak to win, too strong to be defeated, too maniacal to fathom. So Liberia awakes and greets another day of absurdity: The hope of peace seems as elusive as the war is exhausting in this wrecked nation, America's beachhead in Africa. At "Zero Guard Post"--named because to kill is to "zero someone"--on the path from Monrovia to Tubmanburg, boys wait.
NEWS
February 1, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fighters are too weak to win, too strong to be defeated, too maniacal to fathom. So Liberia awakes and greets another day of absurdity: The hope of peace seems as elusive as the war is exhausting in this wrecked nation, America's beachhead in Africa. At "Zero Guard Post"--named because to kill is to "zero someone"--on the path from Monrovia to Tubmanburg, boys wait.
NEWS
April 17, 1996 | SUDARSAN RAGHAVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Inside the kitchen of the U.S. Embassy in this battle-scarred West African capital, members of five different ethnic groups are working side by side. One Liberian pours pancake batter into a pan and hands it to the cook. Another is taking inventory. To his right, a man is writing up a receipt. To his left, the cashier is ringing up a bill. Together, they run the kitchen as smooth as grease--and nobody is quarreling.
NEWS
February 15, 1994 | Reuters
Thousands of refugees have fled fighting between two Liberian rebel groups and are now crammed into the port of Buchanan, relief workers said. Between 6,000 and 7,000 people are squeezed into the port's two-story Louisa Hotel. Others have taken over homes abandoned earlier by residents who are now returning to find them occupied.
NEWS
June 7, 1993 | From Associated Press
Liberian rebels Sunday slaughtered 300 refugees--mostly women and children--at an abandoned rubber plantation outside Monrovia in an "orgy of killing and mutilation," a U.N. official said. The massacre was the worst in Liberia's 3 1/2-year-old civil war since government soldiers killed 600 members of rival tribes in Monrovia in 1990. "They cut throats, they cut heads . . .
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