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Refugees Libya

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May 18, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 350 Libyan guerrillas trained by the United States to fight dictator Moammar Kadafi have been transported to undisclosed locations in America to be resettled at government expense, American officials said. The decision to accept the soldiers of the self-styled Libya National Army as refugees ended a six-month odyssey for the troops who once served in Kadafi's force that invaded Chad, Libya's southern neighbor. The Office of the U.N.
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WORLD
March 1, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Moammar Kadafi's loyalists appeared to have strengthened their grip on the Libyan capital, while chaos roiled much of the country and spilled over its borders in a wave of frightened refugees. The unrest in Libya has left hundreds dead and nearly frozen the country's oil-based economy. The United Nations reported Monday that more than 100,000 refugees, many of them laborers from nearby countries, have fled to Tunisia and Egypt over the last week to escape destitution and an outbreak of violence that has drawn international condemnation.
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WORLD
March 1, 2011 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Moammar Kadafi's loyalists appeared to have strengthened their grip on the Libyan capital, while chaos roiled much of the country and spilled over its borders in a wave of frightened refugees. The unrest in Libya has left hundreds dead and nearly frozen the country's oil-based economy. The United Nations reported Monday that more than 100,000 refugees, many of them laborers from nearby countries, have fled to Tunisia and Egypt over the last week to escape destitution and an outbreak of violence that has drawn international condemnation.
NEWS
May 18, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 350 Libyan guerrillas trained by the United States to fight dictator Moammar Kadafi have been transported to undisclosed locations in America to be resettled at government expense, American officials said. The decision to accept the soldiers of the self-styled Libya National Army as refugees ended a six-month odyssey for the troops who once served in Kadafi's force that invaded Chad, Libya's southern neighbor. The Office of the U.N.
TRAVEL
July 17, 2011
1. China In Pingyao, a 2,700-year-old city in Shanxi Province, history is a thing of the present. Within the last two years, a luxury hotel, a culinary tour and nearby high-speed rail access have added modern comforts to its traditional charm. An important financial center during the Qing Dynasty, Pingyao has long been known in China for its historic banks, courtyard homes and Ming Dynasty city wall. It was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1997. The city joined the luxury tourism circuit in 2009 with the opening of Jing's Residence, an 18-room, Relais & Chateaux-listed boutique hotel in the former home of a Qing Dynasty silk merchant.
WORLD
March 9, 2011 | By Paul Richter and Peter Nicholas, Los Angeles Times
The Obama administration is drawing careful limits on its potential military involvement in the increasingly bloody struggle between the Libyan government and rebel forces, despite growing calls for Western intervention. Administration officials, while stepping up efforts to help refugees fleeing Libya, say they will provide only secondary military aid to the rebels, such as electronic jamming of government communications, unless an increase in civilian killings by Moammar Kadafi's forces prompts an international consensus for stronger steps.
WORLD
February 24, 2011 | By Henry Chu, Los Angeles Times
The two elderly men were surrounded by scads of beautiful young women, but theirs was the real courtship, a pas de deux between a ruthless North African dictator and a fawning European leader. Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi ardently pursued the approval of Libyan strongman Moammar Kadafi in a relationship that has been a pillar of Italian foreign policy. Flattering him has been key to Italy's continued access to Libya's oil and gas supplies ? worth billions of dollars ?
WORLD
May 12, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske and Patrick J. McDonnell, Los Angeles Times
The frantic satellite phone calls come at all hours to an African priest in Rome from refugees fleeing Libya who find themselves stranded on rickety, overcrowded boats in the Mediterranean. They have his Italian cellphone number and address him by name, often in his native Eritrean tongue or in Amharic, the language of neighboring Ethiopia. During the last two months, word has spread among sub-Saharan refugees that if they get stranded at sea, Father Moses Zerai, 36, is the one to call for help.
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