Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRefugees Macedonia
IN THE NEWS

Refugees Macedonia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 6, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN and TYLER MARSHALL and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a rousing visit to a U.S. military base engaged in the air war over Yugoslavia, President Clinton on Wednesday told hundreds of exuberant, flag-waving Air Force personnel and their families here that NATO aircraft were hitting targets "hard, where it hurts" in a conflict fought to ensure a better world. "Our mission in Kosovo has nothing to do with trying to acquire territory or dominate others," Clinton said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 5, 2001 | From Reuters
This nation's fighters put their weapons aside Monday to let aid workers evacuate sick and elderly civilians trapped by weeks of combat between the army and ethnic Albanian rebels. The International Committee of the Red Cross, the lead humanitarian agency in the crisis zone, rescued 66 women, sick children and old men from the village of Lipkovo in the first such mercy mission it had been able to make in nine days.
Advertisement
NEWS
April 9, 1999 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like hundreds of thousands of his fellow Kosovo Albanians, Bashkim Millaku was forced at gunpoint to leave his home and his country by Serbian troops last week. On his way, the 36-year-old father of two was caught in a roundup of 400 men, held prisoner for three days and two nights, tormented mentally and physically, robbed and denied food and water. He was used as a human shield. By the time Millaku reached Albania on Saturday night, he was in shock.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
Even if the fraying peace agreement with Serbia can be stitched back together, it would be an overstatement to describe it as a triumph after all the human suffering and physical destruction that have ravaged Kosovo these last 10 weeks. But if NATO can compel compliance--admittedly still a big if--the agreement would represent a vindication for President Clinton and the alliance. Clinton is routinely accused of lacking the self-discipline to set a course and stick to it.
NEWS
May 25, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thousands of Kosovo refugees streamed into Macedonia on Monday, and thousands more waited for daybreak so they too could cross a no man's land into the country, as Yugoslav forces stepped up efforts to drive ethnic Albanians out of their province. Officials of the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees estimated that 9,000 would cross the border by dawn today.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
NATO's top U.S. military commander has decided that he will need at least 40,000 troops--an increase of more than 40% over earlier estimates--to keep peace in Kosovo once the fighting ends, alliance sources said Monday. The revised peacekeeping plan, drafted by Gen. Wesley K. Clark, is based on the assumption that Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic will ultimately accept NATO's conditions for a truce, allowing the troops to enter the province unopposed.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Returning to Kosovo seemed just around the corner to the refugees here when they first arrived in Macedonia, where the camps are barely a 10-minute drive from the mountainous border. But now, with NATO's air war on Yugoslavia ending its eighth week, thousands of refugees are clamoring to get on flights to foreign countries.
NEWS
May 21, 1999 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER and ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When veteran refugee worker Lynne Miller arrived here from Africa earlier this month, she stepped into a different world. Miller had just spent three years monitoring food supplies at a remote refugee camp in Somalia, and one of her first crises in Macedonia was an urgent request from a medical team. A diabetic refugee had crossed the border. Could she provide a special diet? She couldn't believe what she was hearing, much less that she was able to fulfill the request.
NEWS
May 24, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than 500 exhausted, emaciated Kosovo men of fighting age staggered across the border into Albania on Sunday, telling harrowing tales of being beaten, starved and forced to fight one another like gladiators before their Serbian captors.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN
Even if the fraying peace agreement with Serbia can be stitched back together, it would be an overstatement to describe it as a triumph after all the human suffering and physical destruction that have ravaged Kosovo these last 10 weeks. But if NATO can compel compliance--admittedly still a big if--the agreement would represent a vindication for President Clinton and the alliance. Clinton is routinely accused of lacking the self-discipline to set a course and stick to it.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Led by President Clinton, U.S. officials of all stripes reacted warily Thursday to the news that Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic had agreed to a peace plan for Kosovo, stressing that he could prove himself only by deeds, not words. "We have some encouraging news on Kosovo," Clinton said in a Rose Garden statement. "But we should be cautious and we should see real results." Until then, Clinton said, the NATO air war against Yugoslavia would continue.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In yielding to NATO and agreeing to withdraw his army and police forces from Kosovo, Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic has surrendered on nearly every point except the one that matters most to him: his supremacy as the leader of Yugoslavia. But the war he provoked by defying NATO has lasted far longer than either side calculated, leaving him to preside over an isolated and ruined country that may ultimately prove more unruly than the one he mastered for the last decade.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | PAUL RICHTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If the peace agreement with Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic holds, the United States and its allies will have accomplished what some military experts had predicted was impossible: a victory achieved with air power alone. Air power is generally held to be a limited weapon unless combined with ground forces, and many senior U.S. military officials have acknowledged that NATO's campaign defied conventional practice.
NEWS
May 30, 1999 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic, in a new retreat after 9 1/2 weeks of allied bombing, has offered to give NATO commanders and troops a limited peacekeeping role in Kosovo, Russian and Yugoslav media said Saturday. Milosevic reportedly made the concession in talks here Friday with Russian envoy Viktor S. Chernomyrdin, producing the first detailed plan for a peacekeeping force that Belgrade would accept. Kosovo is a province of Serbia, the dominant Yugoslav republic.
NEWS
May 25, 1999
A roundup of events as NATO airstrikes continue in Yugoslavia: * Macedonia: Thousands of Kosovo Albanians stream across the border. * Montenegro: Head of U.N. fact-finding team calls situation in Kosovo "revolting." * Serbia: Crowds rally against the call-up of local men for military service. * Brussels: NATO chief says Yugoslav leader may be "cracking."
NEWS
May 25, 1999 | ALISSA J. RUBIN and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Thousands of Kosovo refugees streamed into Macedonia on Monday, and thousands more waited for daybreak so they too could cross a no man's land into the country, as Yugoslav forces stepped up efforts to drive ethnic Albanians out of their province. Officials of the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees estimated that 9,000 would cross the border by dawn today.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Led by President Clinton, U.S. officials of all stripes reacted warily Thursday to the news that Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic had agreed to a peace plan for Kosovo, stressing that he could prove himself only by deeds, not words. "We have some encouraging news on Kosovo," Clinton said in a Rose Garden statement. "But we should be cautious and we should see real results." Until then, Clinton said, the NATO air war against Yugoslavia would continue.
NEWS
April 15, 1999 | MARJORIE MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
British Defense Secretary George Robertson asserted Wednesday that two of the Balkans' most wanted war crimes suspects are helping to direct the repression of ethnic Albanians in the war-torn province of Kosovo. The former Bosnian Serb commander, Gen. Ratko Mladic, indicted by the United Nations war crimes tribunal in The Hague for the slaughter of thousands of Muslims in Srebrenica in 1995, is "leading a gang of paramilitary commandos in Kosovo right now," Robertson said at a press briefing.
NEWS
May 25, 1999 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 2 1/2 days without water and electricity, residents of a 10-story apartment complex on the edge of Belgrade descended darkened stairwells late Monday with as many empty plastic containers as they could carry. A municipal water truck, the Yugoslav and Serbian capital's latest defense against NATO, had lumbered into the parking lot and opened its tap. As children scampered in and out of the truck's cabin, adults took turns at the thick black hoses protruding from the back.
NEWS
May 24, 1999 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the miserable camps and shelters for Kosovo refugees, the notorious scafisti who for years have spirited Albanian women across the Adriatic Sea to lives of prostitution have found lucrative new prey for their nocturnal crossings.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|