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NEWS
March 25, 1994 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what appears to be a precedent-setting case, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service has granted asylum to a gay Mexican who said his sexual orientation subjected him to persecution in his homeland. Jose Garcia won his bid to remain in the United States earlier this week after telling immigration authorities that he was ostracized by fellow citizens and harassed, beaten and raped by Mexican police because he is gay.
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NEWS
May 27, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING and PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mexican officials Thursday denied claims by the relatives of Mario Aburto Martinez, the man accused of killing presidential candidate Luis Donaldo Colosio, that they have been persecuted--and authorities now say they are now seeking new evidence from the suspect's father. A statement from the attorney general's office contradicted the claims of six Aburto family members who asked for political asylum in the United States earlier this week.
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NEWS
May 27, 1994 | JUANITA DARLING and PATRICK J. McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Mexican officials Thursday denied claims by the relatives of Mario Aburto Martinez, the man accused of killing presidential candidate Luis Donaldo Colosio, that they have been persecuted--and authorities now say they are now seeking new evidence from the suspect's father. A statement from the attorney general's office contradicted the claims of six Aburto family members who asked for political asylum in the United States earlier this week.
NEWS
March 25, 1994 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what appears to be a precedent-setting case, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service has granted asylum to a gay Mexican who said his sexual orientation subjected him to persecution in his homeland. Jose Garcia won his bid to remain in the United States earlier this week after telling immigration authorities that he was ostracized by fellow citizens and harassed, beaten and raped by Mexican police because he is gay.
NEWS
February 21, 1989
A former Mexican army soldier, who admitted he shot 60 political prisoners and helped kill more than a hundred others, was granted political refugee status in Canada, according to his lawyer. Zacarias Osorio Cruz, 32, now lives near Montreal and is employed as an agricultural worker. A report published in the Toronto Star said Cruz told authorities that between 1977 and 1982, he was ordered to secretly kill prisoners who were "troublesome or bothersome to the high command."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1986
In criticizing The Times' forthright editorial (May 22) on the Sanctuary Movement, L.D. Smithey asks (Letters, June 3) why Central Americans do not avail themselves of United Nations camps in southern Mexico. This assertion of "safe haven" in Mexico is also made by the U.S. State Department, but has no basis in fact. Not being signatory to the 1951 U.N. Convention or 1967 Protocol on refugees, Mexico gives no recognition to refugee status. Its de facto policy is rather to discourage entry.
NEWS
March 11, 1987 | From Reuters
The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization said Tuesday that it has approved $9.6 million worth of emergency food aid for refugees in Mexico, Djibouti, Sudan and Uganda. The FAO said Mexico will get food aid worth around $940,000 to help Guatemalan refugees and Djibouti will get food worth around $640,000 to help Ethiopian refugees. It said that aid to Sudan is to help displaced people from the south of the country. Uganda is to get $1.
NEWS
May 4, 1991 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At two hotels here, enemies from two seemingly interminable Central American conflicts have laid the groundwork for talks this month that offer the best hope yet to finally end the fighting. Mexico's low-profile role in bringing Salvadoran and Guatemalan negotiators together is indicative of a new kind of regional leadership.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 1991 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Operators of a controversial soup kitchen in Topanga said Monday they will suspend service for two weeks or more after receiving angry phone calls from residents opposed to the free meals. The group, People Assisting Topanga Canyon With Helping Hands, or PATCH, decided that discontinuing the midmorning meals until at least April 1 will also give them an opportunity to explain the difference between the several dozen day laborers they serve and the homeless who are of concern to residents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1987 | XABIER GOROSTIAGA, Xabier Gorostiaga, SJ, is the president of the Regional Institute of Social and Economic Research (CRIES), based in Managua, and a member of the Inter-American Dialogue
MANAGUA--Four months after the birth of the Central American peace accord, none of the predictions made by those interested in minimizing its importance have come to life. In fact, the efforts to project a pessimistic and negative image only wound up strengthening the efforts to defend the viability of the plan and to push for its consolidation.
NEWS
February 21, 1989
A former Mexican army soldier, who admitted he shot 60 political prisoners and helped kill more than a hundred others, was granted political refugee status in Canada, according to his lawyer. Zacarias Osorio Cruz, 32, now lives near Montreal and is employed as an agricultural worker. A report published in the Toronto Star said Cruz told authorities that between 1977 and 1982, he was ordered to secretly kill prisoners who were "troublesome or bothersome to the high command."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 9, 1995 | ALISON BRYSK, Alison Brysk is assistant professor of politics at Pomona College and the author of "The Politics of Human Rights in Argentina" (Stanford University Press, 1994). and
As a liberal Democrat, feminist and human-rights advocate, let me be the first to congratulate the new Republican majority on its sophisticated plan to address the immigration crisis by turning the United States into a Third World country. This subtle strategy will turn back the rising tide of immigration by transforming our golden shores into a destination not unlike those the "huddled masses" are fleeing.
NEWS
March 21, 1991 | MICHAEL ARKUSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One by one, the men, lost in conversation and the hunt for work, converged by the picnic table behind the Topanga Christian Fellowship Church. Waiting for them was a constant in a life of uncertainty. Their soup. "Connecting to them is so rewarding," said Maryana Palmer, a volunteer who served the soup on a recent morning. "Even though I can't speak Spanish, I'm able to communicate with these men. They know I care."
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