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Refugees Mozambique

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NEWS
October 28, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seven members of a California-based aid group were apprehended by government forces while delivering medical aid to refugees in Mozambique, a spokesman for the group said. David Courson, president of Christian Emergency Relief Team, based in Carlsbad, said those seized include six Americans and a South African. He said they were taken Tuesday to Tete, a town in the country's northwest. Marxist-ruled Mozambique has been racked for years by a rightist insurgency.
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NEWS
December 25, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first word of the catastrophe brewing in this former mining town deep in the interior came from a band of 50 naked, starving men. They emerged from the bush one day at an emergency feeding center at Gile, 40 miles east, unclothed except for strips of tree bark and begging for seeds and farm implements. There are 20,000 of us in Morrua, they told a stunned worker from World Vision International, the Monrovia, Calif.
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NEWS
April 21, 1988
The United States said it is appalled by atrocities committed by Mozambique rebels against civilians, as detailed in a report commissioned by the State Department. The report, based on interviews with refugees who fled Mozambique, said the Mozambique National Resistance conducts a terror campaign against villages and farms, killing or enslaving thousands of civilians. It estimated that the rebels may have caused 100,000 deaths over the last two years.
NEWS
October 28, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Seven members of a California-based aid group were apprehended by government forces while delivering medical aid to refugees in Mozambique, a spokesman for the group said. David Courson, president of Christian Emergency Relief Team, based in Carlsbad, said those seized include six Americans and a South African. He said they were taken Tuesday to Tete, a town in the country's northwest. Marxist-ruled Mozambique has been racked for years by a rightist insurgency.
NEWS
December 25, 1990 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The first word of the catastrophe brewing in this former mining town deep in the interior came from a band of 50 naked, starving men. They emerged from the bush one day at an emergency feeding center at Gile, 40 miles east, unclothed except for strips of tree bark and begging for seeds and farm implements. There are 20,000 of us in Morrua, they told a stunned worker from World Vision International, the Monrovia, Calif.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Madih Asmani had a straw bed mat on his head and his legs were swollen from two nights of hiking when he first laid tired eyes on this oasis. Power lines hung limply over a highway turned to weeds, coconuts rotted beside trees felled out of spite and sunlight poured into hundreds of roofless stores and houses. But the sight of government soldiers in a ring of bunkers, shouldering AK-47 rifles to protect what little was left here, lifted his spirits.
NEWS
June 28, 1990 | Reuters
The 39-mile electric fence on South Africa's border with Mozambique has killed 94 people since it was built in 1986, the South African Council of Churches said Wednesday. Refugee specialist Sol Jacob said that appeals to the South African government to switch off the 3,500-volt fence have gone unheeded. South Africa erected the fence along a small part of the 280-mile frontier, reinforcing already rigorous steps to stem a flood of refugees fleeing Mozambique's civil war.
NEWS
August 1, 1986 | Associated Press
President Pieter W. Botha today amended state-of-emergency regulations so that new curfews, restrictions and banning orders may be issued to replace those struck down in court. Meanwhile, the military switched on the current for an electrified fence intended to stop the flow of refugees from Mozambique.
NEWS
May 5, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
Arriving in Malawi, whose economic self-sufficiency has been all but destroyed by a heavy influx of refugees from Mozambique, Pope John Paul II paid tribute Thursday to the remarkable selflessness of the people of this African country. "The international community applauds your generosity," the Pope said on the final stop of a nine-day visit to southern Africa. He will leave Saturday for Rome, having visited--in addition to Malawi--Madagascar, the French island of Reunion and Zambia since beginning the tour April 28. The pontiff was greeted at Blantyre airport by perhaps the most distinctive head of state he has encountered on this trip, H. Kamuzu Banda, the nonagenarian "president for life" of Malawi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 31, 1989 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six medical relief workers and their two guides were released without charge Monday by Mozambique amid conflicting reports about what country they were in and what they were doing when they were captured.
NEWS
April 21, 1988
The United States said it is appalled by atrocities committed by Mozambique rebels against civilians, as detailed in a report commissioned by the State Department. The report, based on interviews with refugees who fled Mozambique, said the Mozambique National Resistance conducts a terror campaign against villages and farms, killing or enslaving thousands of civilians. It estimated that the rebels may have caused 100,000 deaths over the last two years.
NEWS
August 16, 1987 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
Madih Asmani had a straw bed mat on his head and his legs were swollen from two nights of hiking when he first laid tired eyes on this oasis. Power lines hung limply over a highway turned to weeds, coconuts rotted beside trees felled out of spite and sunlight poured into hundreds of roofless stores and houses. But the sight of government soldiers in a ring of bunkers, shouldering AK-47 rifles to protect what little was left here, lifted his spirits.
NEWS
March 25, 1990 | SANDY ROVNER, THE WASHINGTON POST
When Michael J. Toole was coordinating health care in Somalia's refugee camps in 1981, a mysterious illness erupted that struck the children especially hard. The main symptom was pain and weakness in joints so terrible the youngsters could barely walk and, often, could not stand. Most of them also had bleeding gums. In one camp, some fathers told the doctors they had cured their children by taking them out into the bush and feeding them camel's milk.
NEWS
July 23, 1985 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, Times Staff Writer
"Our purpose here is to discuss how to improve the situation of women and children who are 80% of the 10 million refugees in the world," Catherine O'Neill said at the beginning of the International Rescue Committee's workshop on the maternal and child health care problems of refugees. "Our purpose is not to find out how to stop the creation of refugees," she went on, "or solve the political problems.
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