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Refugees Nicaragua

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NEWS
July 1, 1987
The House Judiciary Committee approved a bill that would suspend deportations of refugees from Nicaragua and El Salvador for two years, a move adamantly opposed by the Reagan Administration. The legislation would give a special status, called "extended voluntary departure," to refugees from those war-torn countries while the General Accounting Office studies whether they would face persecution back home. The committee vote was 20 to 15, split on party lines.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1999 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Christmas has been a bittersweet holiday for Gloria Zapata since she left her younger son, Maykell, in Nicaragua 11 years ago to start a new life in Los Angeles. Zapata had two small children and was unmarried when she fled the war and poverty of her homeland. Zapata left Maykell with her sister, hoping to be reunited with him someday. But for 11 years, her illegal status has kept her from bringing him to this country.
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NEWS
July 29, 1987 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
In a debate dominated by controversy over the Reagan Administration's policies in Central America, the House voted Tuesday to temporarily block the deportation of more than 700,000 illegal immigrants from Nicaragua and El Salvador. The measure, which was approved 237 to 181 on a largely partisan vote, now goes to the Senate, where Republicans have said it is likely to encounter strong opposition.
NEWS
November 4, 1990 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On one glorious night last February the streets of what is called Little Managua exploded in blue and white flags, the music of guitars and marimbas, and euphoric Nicaraguan exiles. The Himno Nacional was sung more than once that Monday night, and every other person, it seemed, vowed to be back in the other Managua, the one 1,000 miles south of here, come summer.
NEWS
January 10, 1989 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, Times Staff Writer
Hundreds of Central American refugees, many of them living for weeks in a South Texas shantytown, were granted the right to leave Monday after a federal judge ordered the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to stop refusing them permission to travel while their asylum applications are being reviewed. The action, a temporary restraining order issued by U.S.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration, maintaining that a December deadline for disarming Nicaragua's Contras is not binding, said Tuesday that it will resist any efforts to demobilize the rebel forces until the leftist government in Managua institutes democratic reforms. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said the United States is "generally supportive" of a Central American agreement that calls for dismantling the rebel army within four months but does not believe that the plan's Dec.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
The federal government, in a quandary over how to handle the massive influx of Central Americans seeking political asylum, is debating a range of approaches, including detention centers, Bush Administration sources said Saturday. One source said that idea, which drew immediate criticism from immigrant advocates, is at the "conservative end of the scale."
NEWS
March 17, 1989
A Nicaraguan delegation will visit Contra camps in Honduras this month to look into allegations that the rebels are holding Nicaraguans against their will, the archbishop of Managua announced. Cardinal Miguel Obando y Bravo spoke after the National Reconciliation Commission, which he heads, met to discuss recent peace moves. Obando said that the delegation, made up of members of Parliament, opposition politicians and a Roman Catholic bishop, will travel to Honduras on March 28.
NEWS
March 29, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration is encouraging Nicaraguan rebel leaders to return to Managua and participate in the country's upcoming election campaign as part of its new diplomatic strategy in Central America, U.S. and Contra officials said Tuesday.
NEWS
June 29, 1990 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Immigration and Naturalization Service Commissioner Gene McNary suggested Thursday that the federal government consider providing loans to Nicaraguans who fled the civil war in their country but now want to return home and rebuild the nation's economy.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Equipped with food-laden backpacks, guns and grenade launchers, hundreds of Contras have streamed out of their base camps in Honduras and are hiking along mountainous jungle trails back into Nicaragua. As the U.S.-backed guerrillas hastily empty their sanctuary, some rebels are torching their wood-frame huts and old uniforms in dramatic bonfires--a sign they do not plan to come back.
NEWS
March 9, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The economic adviser to President-elect Violeta Barrios de Chamorro said Thursday that Nicaragua will immediately need $600 million to $800 million to rebuild its fragile economy. He also called for re-entry rights to the United States for Nicaraguan emigres who return to help rebuild their homeland. In meetings on Capitol Hill, Francisco Mayorga outlined the new government's needs, according to Rep. Dante Fascell (D-Fla.), chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.
NEWS
February 27, 1990 | BARRY BEARAK and MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
There are more than 150,000 Nicaraguan exiles in Miami, and, for the past few months, most have insisted that the election in their homeland would result in nothing but a Sandinista fraud and a victory for Daniel Ortega. But Monday, with the votes finally in and President Ortega on his way out, the exile community was a pinwheel of emotions that alternated joy, disbelief and a measure of anxiety about their individual futures.
NEWS
November 3, 1989 | United Press International
The Senate Judiciary Committee voted Thursday to suspend deportations for two years of Salvadorans and Nicaraguans from the United States, pending an investigation of their safety if forced to return home. The legislation, approved 11-3, was sent to the Senate for action. The House has passed a similiar bill. "With the resurgence of violence and killing in El Salvador, and worsening conditions in Nicargua, this legislation takes on great urgency," said Sen. Dennis DeConcini (D-Ariz.).
NEWS
October 26, 1989 | SARA FRITZ and JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The House voted Wednesday to suspend for three years the deportation of illegal immigrants from three nations recently torn by civil strife--China, El Salvador and Nicaragua. It is estimated by the government that there are as many as 800,000 Salvadoran immigrants, 200,000 Nicaraguans and 45,000 Chinese nationals currently living in the United States, either on temporary visas or illegally. About half of the immigrants from El Salvador are believed to be living in California.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The Bush Administration, maintaining that a December deadline for disarming Nicaragua's Contras is not binding, said Tuesday that it will resist any efforts to demobilize the rebel forces until the leftist government in Managua institutes democratic reforms. White House spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said the United States is "generally supportive" of a Central American agreement that calls for dismantling the rebel army within four months but does not believe that the plan's Dec.
NEWS
August 9, 1989 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
Nicaraguan rebel leaders said Tuesday they will respect an accord by Central American presidents to close their bases in Honduras but might deploy at least half their guerrillas into Nicaragua rather than disarm. The landmark agreement, signed Monday after a five-nation summit, was swallowed with bitter resignation by a Contra movement long dependent on U.S. assistance and Honduran sanctuary--and now on the verge of losing both by the end of the year.
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