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Refugees Pakistan

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NEWS
February 17, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Tens of thousands of Afghan refugees are continuing to flee their country despite Wednesday's final Soviet troop withdrawal, and Pakistan is bracing for yet another human wave from its western neighbor in the near future, senior Pakistani government officials said Thursday. What is worse, Pakistan's chief commissioner for Afghan refugees said, few if any of the 3.
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IMAGE
January 16, 2011 | By Ellen Olivier, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Just before the Ludus Athletics models began parading down the runway at the Montage Hotel in Beverly Hills, Vincent Cochetel, North America's representative to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, suggested people imagine an area the size of California under five to eight feet of water for two and a half months. That is the scope, Cochetel said, of last summer's disastrous Pakistan floods, which affected an estimated 20 million people. With Pakistan hosting 1.7 million refugees, primarily from Afghanistan, the U.S. association for UNHCR paired up with Ludus Athletics to raise awareness and funds for these refugees.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2001 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their names are Edris, Elaha and Elham, and until a few days ago they had never set foot in America, much less attended America's premier celebration of independent filmmaking--the Sundance Film Festival. Stepping along the ice-covered sidewalks in this town crammed with filmmakers, Hollywood executives, agents and the world's press, they pass unnoticed through the crowds.
WORLD
May 7, 2009 | Mark Magnier and Zulqifar Ali
They stream down from the mountains, limping along in small groups, riding in battered cars, hanging off jampacked trucks and buses. Along with its long list of problems, the Pakistani government must now cope with hundreds of thousands of stressed and bedraggled civilians fleeing clashes between soldiers and militants.
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
For nearly a decade, Atter Bibi and her family refused to give in to the war that has driven 5 million of her countrymen from their homeland. But this week, the killing finally caught up with her. The 30-year-old Afghan was at her uncle's wedding party in a mud hut near the strategic eastern city of Jalalabad four days ago when the bombing started.
WORLD
May 7, 2009 | Mark Magnier and Zulqifar Ali
They stream down from the mountains, limping along in small groups, riding in battered cars, hanging off jampacked trucks and buses. Along with its long list of problems, the Pakistani government must now cope with hundreds of thousands of stressed and bedraggled civilians fleeing clashes between soldiers and militants.
IMAGE
January 16, 2011 | By Ellen Olivier, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Just before the Ludus Athletics models began parading down the runway at the Montage Hotel in Beverly Hills, Vincent Cochetel, North America's representative to the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, suggested people imagine an area the size of California under five to eight feet of water for two and a half months. That is the scope, Cochetel said, of last summer's disastrous Pakistan floods, which affected an estimated 20 million people. With Pakistan hosting 1.7 million refugees, primarily from Afghanistan, the U.S. association for UNHCR paired up with Ludus Athletics to raise awareness and funds for these refugees.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 14, 1987 | From Reuters
Soviet-backed Afghan air raids on Pakistani border areas over eight years killed 856 people, more than half of them Afghan refugees, Pakistan said Sunday.
NEWS
May 22, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. World Food Program began distributing emergency aid for the first time to tens of thousands of Afghan refugees at a squalid camp in northwestern Pakistan. U.N. food agency spokesman Khaled Mansour said 650 tons of food would be given to about 70,000 residents of Jalozai camp. Jalozai is at the center of a row between Pakistani officials and the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees.
NEWS
February 27, 1986
Soviet troops in Afghanistan killed about 35,000 civilians last year in a campaign of "systematic brutality" that included bombing villages and planting explosives in children's toys, a report prepared for the U.N. Human Rights Commission said. The author was Australian law professor Felix Ermacora, who said his findings are based on testimony from Afghan refugees in Pakistan.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2001 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Their names are Edris, Elaha and Elham, and until a few days ago they had never set foot in America, much less attended America's premier celebration of independent filmmaking--the Sundance Film Festival. Stepping along the ice-covered sidewalks in this town crammed with filmmakers, Hollywood executives, agents and the world's press, they pass unnoticed through the crowds.
NEWS
March 18, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
For nearly a decade, Atter Bibi and her family refused to give in to the war that has driven 5 million of her countrymen from their homeland. But this week, the killing finally caught up with her. The 30-year-old Afghan was at her uncle's wedding party in a mud hut near the strategic eastern city of Jalalabad four days ago when the bombing started.
NEWS
February 17, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Tens of thousands of Afghan refugees are continuing to flee their country despite Wednesday's final Soviet troop withdrawal, and Pakistan is bracing for yet another human wave from its western neighbor in the near future, senior Pakistani government officials said Thursday. What is worse, Pakistan's chief commissioner for Afghan refugees said, few if any of the 3.
NEWS
January 28, 1987 | From Reuters
The U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization said Tuesday that it has approved more than $6.7-million worth of emergency food aid grants for drought victims in Guatemala and refugees in Pakistan, Honduras and Zaire. Nearly $2.9 million was approved to provide maize, rice, dried milk and other foods to Guatemala for 100,000 drought victims. Afghan refugees in Pakistan will get 3,000 tons of dates in an operation worth more than $2.5 million, while Honduras will receive $1.
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