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April 23, 1988 | Associated Press
The Roman Catholic Church in Panama urged the United States on Friday to lift the economic sanctions it imposed on the country to oust strongman Manuel A. Noriega, saying the measures pose "a threat to the life of our people." The church leadership in Panama said in an eight-page pastoral letter that the sanctions "have strongly hit all the people, above all the poorest and the most humble." "We consider that . . .
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NEWS
December 9, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 160 U.S. soldiers suffered mostly minor injuries in two days of riots by rock-throwing Cuban refugees who are increasingly frustrated by their detention in Panama camps, Pentagon officials said here Thursday. The soldiers, most of whom suffered cuts and bruises, were hurt Wednesday night and Thursday when more than 1,000 refugees broke out of three chain-link-enclosed campsites and commandeered military vehicles in an attempt to flee the area near the Panama Canal.
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NEWS
December 25, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Among the 12,000 refugees camped on blankets and cardboard at Balboa High School, a wiry man in Bermuda shorts squatted over his foot-high coconut palm Sunday to hang an array of makeshift Christmas ornaments. The unemployed machinist had lost his home and everything in it to fire ignited by a U.S. air strike last week, but he was determined not to lose out on a Christmas tree. Among the decorations he strung were condiments from a U.S.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | MARJORIE MILLER and DOUGLAS JEHL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Among the 12,000 refugees camped on blankets and cardboard at Balboa High School, a wiry man in Bermuda shorts squatted over his foot-high coconut palm Sunday to hang an array of makeshift Christmas ornaments. The unemployed machinist had lost his home and everything in it to fire ignited by a U.S. air strike last week, but he was determined not to lose out on a Christmas tree. Among the decorations he strung were condiments from a U.S.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The attempted coup against Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega collapsed as plotters argued over whether he should be turned over to the United States, fleeing Panamanian military officers have told U.S. officials. More than three hours into the coup, with rebels in control of the military headquarters and Noriega trapped inside, some rebels argued that he should be delivered for extradition while others insisted on allowing him to remain in Panama.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | RICHARD A. SERRANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 160 U.S. soldiers suffered mostly minor injuries in two days of riots by rock-throwing Cuban refugees who are increasingly frustrated by their detention in Panama camps, Pentagon officials said here Thursday. The soldiers, most of whom suffered cuts and bruises, were hurt Wednesday night and Thursday when more than 1,000 refugees broke out of three chain-link-enclosed campsites and commandeered military vehicles in an attempt to flee the area near the Panama Canal.
NEWS
July 8, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A White House official was taken aback this week when asked how the twists and turns of U.S. policy on Haiti fit into an overall American strategy. "We aren't answering questions about strategy today," the official snapped. That may be the core of the Clinton Administration's problem as it grapples with Haiti, a policy nightmare that has come to torment officials out of all proportion to its size.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton's two latest decisions on Haiti--diverting the flood of refugees to Panama and sending a landing force of 2,000 Marines into the Caribbean--were designed to prevent the Haitian crisis from spinning out of control and to send a message to Haiti's military rulers that American patience is running out, senior officials said Tuesday.
NEWS
July 8, 1994 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Clinton Administration struggled Thursday to salvage its latest Haiti policy, thrown into disarray by Panamanian President Guillermo Endara's abrupt cancellation of an agreement to accept up to 10,000 refugees picked up at sea. Endara's decision, announced at a Panama City news conference, came less than 24 hours before the U.S. government had planned to open a Panama camp with the first 500 Haitians transferred from temporary quarters at the U.S. Naval Base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
NEWS
September 7, 1994 | PATRICK McDONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This beleaguered military base, struggling to accommodate an exodus of migrants from Cuba and Haiti, received some measure of relief Tuesday with the departure of the first of 10,000 Cuban refugees for Panama. About 100 Cubans, seemingly all still hopeful of reaching the United States, boarded two C-130 Air Force transport planes Tuesday afternoon for Howard Air Force Base in Panama, where they were bused to one of four camps still under construction.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The attempted coup against Panamanian dictator Manuel A. Noriega collapsed as plotters argued over whether he should be turned over to the United States, fleeing Panamanian military officers have told U.S. officials. More than three hours into the coup, with rebels in control of the military headquarters and Noriega trapped inside, some rebels argued that he should be delivered for extradition while others insisted on allowing him to remain in Panama.
NEWS
April 23, 1988 | Associated Press
The Roman Catholic Church in Panama urged the United States on Friday to lift the economic sanctions it imposed on the country to oust strongman Manuel A. Noriega, saying the measures pose "a threat to the life of our people." The church leadership in Panama said in an eight-page pastoral letter that the sanctions "have strongly hit all the people, above all the poorest and the most humble." "We consider that . . .
NEWS
July 28, 1997 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five months of nights tossing on the concrete floor of a brightly lighted auditorium and days playing in a makeshift refugee camp's mud and open sewers left Alejandro Perez's 2-year-old daughter shaking with fever. Desperate for money to take her to a big-city hospital, Perez defied Colombia's brutal private militias. Last month, he and his 16-year-old nephew returned to his farm near the Panama border to harvest timber.
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