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NEWS
November 3, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russians consider the border with war-torn Chechnya open for refugees, and it is--for those who want to go back and brave the Russian bombs raining on the separatist republic. But for the desperate thousands waiting in a miles-long column to get out of Chechnya, the road to escape is effectively closed. Of those thousands, only a trickle is being allowed to pass through to safety each day.
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NEWS
February 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
Chechens trying to leave their war-ravaged republic are being tortured in Russian detention camps and subjected to severe beatings, rape and other brutality, refugees and human rights groups say. The allegations come on the heels of other complaints of human rights abuses in Russia's offensive in Chechnya, including reports of summary executions of civilians in Grozny, the Chechen capital.
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NEWS
January 16, 1995 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chechen militants making a final stand Sunday inside the shell-riddled remains of Grozny's presidential palace managed to beat back the Russian forces fighting doggedly to take full control of the rebel capital's center, Russian officials said. Hand-to-hand fighting for the palace, seat of the rebel Chechen government, was reported for the second day.
NEWS
November 18, 1999 | MAYERBEK NUNAYEV and ROBYN DIXON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a near-deserted street, amid the ruin of war, a lone woman struggles with two bags containing the small fragments of family life--the most useful, practical belongings, not the treasured, sentimental things. At times like this, there is no room for warm memories. Zina Askhabova just does what she can to survive. After the bombing began several weeks ago, Askhabova and her family fled Grozny, the Chechen capital, and took refuge in the neighboring Russian republic of Ingushetia.
NEWS
January 17, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vakhit Dachayev said goodby to Grozny from the sidecar of a muddy green motorcycle Monday, joining a flow of refugees from the Russian army's growing air and artillery attacks on the southern perimeter of this rebel capital. "Everyone is scared. Everyone is leaving," said the former tractor driver, whose occupation for the five weeks of this war has been defending his apartment in Grozny's high-rent district.
NEWS
February 18, 2000 | From Associated Press
Chechens trying to leave their war-ravaged republic are being tortured in Russian detention camps and subjected to severe beatings, rape and other brutality, refugees and human rights groups say. The allegations come on the heels of other complaints of human rights abuses in Russia's offensive in Chechnya, including reports of summary executions of civilians in Grozny, the Chechen capital.
NEWS
August 15, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She hid for eight days in a cellar to escape the shells and bombs exploding outside in the hell that Russian troops and Chechen rebels were making of her hometown, Grozny. But when her transistor radio told her a cease-fire would start at midday Wednesday, Lala Eldarova ventured out in a convoy of hundreds of civilians escaping the Chechen capital for the relative safety of the southern hills. Disaster struck minutes after the truce was supposed to begin.
NEWS
November 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
Russia allowed thousands of frightened and angry civilians to flee war-battered Chechnya on Thursday after blocking them at the border for more than a week. Russian ground forces, meanwhile, continued heavy artillery and rocket assaults in Moscow's campaign to wipe out Muslim militants in the separatist republic. More than 200,000 people have fled Chechnya since Russia's offensive began in September. Most have gone to the neighboring republic of Ingushetia.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Chechen refugees in the Russian republic of Ingushetia pleaded for help as a delegation from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe toured a tent city where thousands of people huddled in freezing cold and snow. "They are killing us both morally and physically!" one woman at the camp in Sleptsovskaya shouted during the visit by the group, which will try to assess what can be done to help the refugees.
NEWS
April 12, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raisa was sitting in the back seat of the car waiting for her husband to buy a loaf of bread when Russian soldiers drove an armored personnel carrier over the back end of the flimsy little sedan. The Chechen woman escaped injury only because she was leaning forward, resting her arms on the front seat. Every scrap of metal behind her was mangled.
NEWS
November 11, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
Chechen refugees in the Russian republic of Ingushetia pleaded for help as a delegation from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe toured a tent city where thousands of people huddled in freezing cold and snow. "They are killing us both morally and physically!" one woman at the camp in Sleptsovskaya shouted during the visit by the group, which will try to assess what can be done to help the refugees.
NEWS
November 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
Russia allowed thousands of frightened and angry civilians to flee war-battered Chechnya on Thursday after blocking them at the border for more than a week. Russian ground forces, meanwhile, continued heavy artillery and rocket assaults in Moscow's campaign to wipe out Muslim militants in the separatist republic. More than 200,000 people have fled Chechnya since Russia's offensive began in September. Most have gone to the neighboring republic of Ingushetia.
NEWS
November 3, 1999 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russians consider the border with war-torn Chechnya open for refugees, and it is--for those who want to go back and brave the Russian bombs raining on the separatist republic. But for the desperate thousands waiting in a miles-long column to get out of Chechnya, the road to escape is effectively closed. Of those thousands, only a trickle is being allowed to pass through to safety each day.
NEWS
August 25, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They have hacking coughs after two weeks of hiding in the cellar, and the children still scream when they hear approaching airplanes. But Luiza Autarkhanov and her family count themselves lucky. Last week, they escaped the horror of Grozny, leaving their mansion half-ruined in the wake of a two-week battle between separatist Chechen fighters and Russian soldiers for control of the town center.
NEWS
August 15, 1996 | VANORA BENNETT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She hid for eight days in a cellar to escape the shells and bombs exploding outside in the hell that Russian troops and Chechen rebels were making of her hometown, Grozny. But when her transistor radio told her a cease-fire would start at midday Wednesday, Lala Eldarova ventured out in a convoy of hundreds of civilians escaping the Chechen capital for the relative safety of the southern hills. Disaster struck minutes after the truce was supposed to begin.
NEWS
April 12, 1995 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Raisa was sitting in the back seat of the car waiting for her husband to buy a loaf of bread when Russian soldiers drove an armored personnel carrier over the back end of the flimsy little sedan. The Chechen woman escaped injury only because she was leaning forward, resting her arms on the front seat. Every scrap of metal behind her was mangled.
NEWS
November 18, 1999 | MAYERBEK NUNAYEV and ROBYN DIXON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a near-deserted street, amid the ruin of war, a lone woman struggles with two bags containing the small fragments of family life--the most useful, practical belongings, not the treasured, sentimental things. At times like this, there is no room for warm memories. Zina Askhabova just does what she can to survive. After the bombing began several weeks ago, Askhabova and her family fled Grozny, the Chechen capital, and took refuge in the neighboring Russian republic of Ingushetia.
NEWS
December 19, 1994 | From Associated Press
Russia warned them to leave Grozny before fighting became too fierce, but for one group of civilians the terror came on the road. Drunken Russian soldiers in armored personnel carriers cut them off, opened fire and crushed their cars, then hunted down the wounded as they tried to flee, witnesses and officials said. Nine people were believed killed, but there were no bodies left at the scene to verify that. The refugees were heading for the neighboring republic of Ingushetia.
NEWS
January 17, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vakhit Dachayev said goodby to Grozny from the sidecar of a muddy green motorcycle Monday, joining a flow of refugees from the Russian army's growing air and artillery attacks on the southern perimeter of this rebel capital. "Everyone is scared. Everyone is leaving," said the former tractor driver, whose occupation for the five weeks of this war has been defending his apartment in Grozny's high-rent district.
NEWS
January 16, 1995 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chechen militants making a final stand Sunday inside the shell-riddled remains of Grozny's presidential palace managed to beat back the Russian forces fighting doggedly to take full control of the rebel capital's center, Russian officials said. Hand-to-hand fighting for the palace, seat of the rebel Chechen government, was reported for the second day.
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