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Refugees Rwanda

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NEWS
August 10, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Death we have seen, and by the numbing long ton. But imagine this other ordeal: being left alone in the world with nothing. Sick, naked, wet in a pool of your own uncontrollable excrement, too weak to do anything except tremble. Not a possession, no family or friends, no country, perhaps not even a name you can remember. "And these are the lucky ones.
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NEWS
December 19, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A massacre earlier this month of at least 327 mostly Tutsi refugees by Hutu insurgents at a camp in northwestern Rwanda is "a resurgence of genocide," Clinton administration officials asserted Thursday. State Department spokesman James P. Rubin said the U.S. government will not act on its own but is prepared to assist in any international effort to bring the killers to justice.
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NEWS
March 30, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After six months and nearly 600 miles, a long-missing group of Rwandan Hutu refugees has reached the end of the road in a sad, strange odyssey. Here in Zaire's jungle gloom, where towering trees and thick foliage block the equatorial sun, most of the refugees--who fled deeper into Zaire last year instead of returning home with hundreds of thousands of their brethren--say they have been on the run long enough. Now they want to go home.
NEWS
December 14, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Screams of agony ripped through the silence that had blanketed Rwanda's northwestern Mudende refugee camp as darkness fell and hundreds of rebels brandishing machetes, guns and nail-studded clubs descended upon the refugees, most of them asleep under makeshift tents of plastic sheeting. Rangwida Ugiriwabo watched in horror as her husband and four children were shot to death, then she scrambled for safety inside a nearby bush.
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | From Associated Press
The United States put troops on alert Wednesday for participation in a potential airdrop of relief supplies for hundreds of thousands of Rwandan refugees in Zaire. The airdrop proposal was put forth by Canada as part of a broader Canadian plan that also includes the establishment of a multinational base of operations in Central Africa to coordinate relief efforts.
NEWS
November 30, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rwanda's 2 million refugees are among the most terrified people in Africa. If they return home, they risk harassment, jail and death--or so many of them believe, because their leaders tell them so. So for more than a year, the great masses of peasant refugees, most of them Hutus, have cowered in their city-camps in Zaire and Tanzania--multimillion-dollar wards of the world's relief agencies.
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Worldwide impatience and demands for swift repatriation are hampering work with the refugees of Bosnia and Rwanda, humanitarian fieldworkers and policymakers declared at a conference at Princeton University this week. Conference participants pleaded with politicians and the public to understand that speed is an enemy when dealing with the attempted resettlement of 27 million refugees throughout the world. "Healing the wounds takes time," said Sadako Ogata of Japan, the U.N.
NEWS
August 19, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The mountain forests of Central Africa rise steeply from the banks of Lake Kivu at this remote, run-down resort town. The 200,000 or so residents here prefer to lift their eyes from the seedy streets and proclaim it the "green city." But now, under the unstoppable pressure of another Rwandan refugee migration, Bukavu is being reduced hour by hour to another squalid cesspool of misery.
NEWS
April 24, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tens of thousands of Rwandan refugees escaped down rain-slicked roads and into the soggy hills in panic Sunday after the army shut down their camps inside Rwanda--leaving an estimated 2,000 shot, trampled or butchered to death. The army ordered the refugees to return to their former homes, promising them peace. But U.N. officials said many of those who tried to go home were pelted with stones and attacked.
NEWS
August 24, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At the point of a gun, Rwanda's suffering refugees are being sent home. This week, as of Wednesday, 13,000 or so men, women and children had been rounded up and trucked to the border here and at two other locations in eastern Zaire. They had been uprooted from entrenched camps, plucked off streets, corralled at watering stations, marched from jails, packed along, then ordered to walk the last eerie 100 feet across a no-man's-land, back to the country they left in panic 14 months ago.
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
President Laurent Kabila's government alleged that the leader of a U.N. team sent to investigate alleged massacres of Rwandan refugees was biased, threatening to scuttle the probe for the third time. The team leader, former Togolese Chief Justice Atsu-Koffi Amega, said hours earlier that the Congolese government had raised new issues that he declined to identify and that he said threatened to derail the investigation.
NEWS
August 25, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Stalled for months by government resistance, a U.N. team arrived to investigate alleged massacres of Rwandan refugees by President Laurent Kabila's soldiers. The probe will be a watered-down version of the one originally envisioned when reports of atrocities by Kabila's army first emerged. The U.N. was forced to name a new team leader and change the investigators' mandate to win Kabila's cooperation.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
Backing down from earlier assertions that it had nothing to do with alleged massacres of Rwandan refugees, Congo's government now acknowledges that some may have been killed in cross-fire during the recent civil war. President Laurent Kabila's government is hoping that the admission, while far from an acknowledgment that his forces committed atrocities, is enough to secure aid for his ravaged land during a visit today by envoy Bill Richardson, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.
NEWS
June 4, 1997 | From Reuters
The U.N. refugee agency urged Congo President Laurent Kabila and other African leaders Tuesday to take steps to protect Rwandan refugees in the wake of the killing last week of an aid worker and four refugees in the eastern Congo. Spokeswoman Pam O'Toole said the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees is suspending its aid work at Karuba, near Goma, where Kabila's soldiers reportedly carried out the May 29 shooting.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 1997
A picture may be worth a thousand words, but a photo of a Rwandan refugee in Zaire is worth almost $1,000 in nickels, dimes and quarters collected in a student coin drive at Pacific Elementary School in Manhattan Beach. A newspaper picture of an emaciated teenager squatting in a refugee camp inspired the Student Council to launch a money-raising drive in all grades to help those fleeing the killing in Rwanda. The students today are presenting a $960 check to the Red Cross.
NEWS
May 12, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
An aid mission to an area of eastern Zaire not visited by United Nations officials for weeks has discovered thousands of Rwandan Hutu refugees, many on the verge of death, U.N. officials said. Aid officials who traveled to Ubolo village distributed 26 tons of food before leaving with 468 refugees, mainly children. "We found about 5,000 to 6,000 refugees near a village [51 miles] south of Kisangani," said Julian Fleet, a U.N. refugee agency official who led the mission.
NEWS
April 29, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.N. officials Monday called it an act of "utmost barbarism": In the middle of the night, soldiers burst into a hospital in eastern Zaire where 50 severely malnourished Rwandan children were receiving emergency food and threw them "like sacks of potatoes" onto the back of a truck to be driven away to an unknown fate.
NEWS
August 3, 1994 | BOB DROGIN and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Daniel Schroeder, a ramrod-straight soldier with a closely shaved head and a razor-sharp manner, paused only once in his rapid-fire answers to a gaggle of reporters at a recent briefing here. Schroeder, head of the task force running Operation Support Hope, the U.S. attempt to alleviate the suffering of more than 1 million Rwandan refugees, said he was considering using an American truck company to transport food and refugees in Rwanda.
NEWS
May 5, 1997 | From Reuters
More than 100 Hutu refugees suffocated or were crushed to death Sunday in a train carrying them from a refugee camp in Zaire to be airlifted home to Rwanda, a U.N. official said. Aid workers and journalists saw dozens of bodies tumbling from open railroad cars as the train carrying them from Biaro, about 25 miles away, pulled into Kisangani station in northeastern Zaire. The weak, children and dozens of desperately ill adults aboard had been forced to the bottom of the cars in the crush.
NEWS
May 3, 1997 | Reuters
Zairian rebels who abducted 52 sick Rwandan Hutu refugee children from a hospital kept them in a container van without food or water and beat some before releasing them five days later, U.N. agencies said Friday. The Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees said it had asked the Tutsi-dominated rebels, who face growing charges of human rights abuses and violence against the refugees, to explain the abduction and mistreatment. U.N.
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