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Refugees Rwanda

NEWS
August 1, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary William J. Perry said after an inspection here Sunday that U.S. soldiers may be deployed for "a year or longer" to help more than 1 million Rwandan refugees facing death and disease in nightmarish camps along the Zairian border. Perry said that the 1,000 Americans now deployed in Zaire, Rwanda, Kenya and Uganda as part of Operation Support Hope are on "a humanitarian mission" to alleviate the suffering of the refugees and to help them return home.
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NEWS
July 30, 1994 | DAVID LAUTER and ART PINE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton ordered 200 U.S. troops to Rwanda on Friday to reopen the airport in Kigali, the nation's capital. Officials insisted that American forces will be used solely for humanitarian aid and will not be drawn into peacekeeping operations. "The United States must do more," Clinton said at a White House news conference earlier in the day.
NEWS
November 15, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Purple wildflowers and weeds now shroud the unmarked mass graves. The once grisly dump trucks cart mounds of garbage, not corpses. Fresh water gushes from countless taps, and the rain-washed air is clean and clear. Ambulances rush the sick to some of Africa's best-equipped hospitals, where they are treated by experts from around the world.
NEWS
December 14, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Screams of agony ripped through the silence that had blanketed Rwanda's northwestern Mudende refugee camp as darkness fell and hundreds of rebels brandishing machetes, guns and nail-studded clubs descended upon the refugees, most of them asleep under makeshift tents of plastic sheeting. Rangwida Ugiriwabo watched in horror as her husband and four children were shot to death, then she scrambled for safety inside a nearby bush.
NEWS
September 16, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Foaming at the mouth and panting, the parched and emaciated boy lay on an olive-drab stretcher, the body inside his yellow-and-red T-shirt wasted down to the size of a healthy 2-year-old. Cpl. Kevin Kus, 37, held a thick syringe of solution of rehydration salts in his hands, squeezing it drip by drip into the clear plastic tube that led into the boy's nose. A father himself, the small, stocky soldier from Sheffield, England, was stunned at how small the 5-year-old Rwandan had become.
NEWS
July 22, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The acrid stench of death filled the air here Thursday, as hundreds upon hundreds of corpses--a few here, a dozen a few yards farther, 25 more just beyond--lined dusty roads and littered the cruel fields of what has become the world's closest glimpse of hell.
NEWS
July 24, 1994 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Desperately needed food and water finally arrived at this nightmarish camp for 150,000 sick and weakened Rwandan refugees Saturday, but the living literally had to walk over and around the dead to reach it. Corpses of cholera victims, many of them uncovered and rotting in the hot African sun, piled up on this desolate volcanic wasteland.
NEWS
July 27, 1994 | JEFF LEEDS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. diplomatic and military officials, fending off criticism that American shipments of food and medicine to Rwandan refugees have come too little and too late, said Tuesday that the crisis is showing signs of abating. "It's not too late for the living," said J. Brian Atwood, administrator of the Agency for International Development, an arm of the State Department. He noted that some of the 1.
NEWS
June 6, 1997 | From Associated Press
Backing down from earlier assertions that it had nothing to do with alleged massacres of Rwandan refugees, Congo's government now acknowledges that some may have been killed in cross-fire during the recent civil war. President Laurent Kabila's government is hoping that the admission, while far from an acknowledgment that his forces committed atrocities, is enough to secure aid for his ravaged land during a visit today by envoy Bill Richardson, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations.
NEWS
February 17, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Rebel leader Laurent Kabila, responding to a plea from the United Nations, agreed to delay a threatened attack on the nation's largest refugee camp. Kabila had threatened to assault the Tingi-Tingi camp, which is on the rebels' northern front, this week unless the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees drove out Rwandans he says are armed by the Zairian government.
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