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Refugees Security

NEWS
July 22, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While the West threatened to get tough, Bosnian Serbs on Friday renewed their heavy mortar fire on the U.N.-protected enclave of Zepa and attacked three other "safe areas," U.N. and government sources said. The Bosnian Serbs resumed their week-old offensive against Zepa after negotiations for the surrender of its Muslim defenders collapsed.
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NEWS
July 22, 1995 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The United States and its major European allies agreed Friday to take "substantial and decisive" action--almost certainly a wide-ranging campaign of punishing air strikes--if Bosnian Serb forces attack the "safe area" of Gorazde in Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
July 17, 1995 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Muslim enclave of Zepa faced a Bosnian Serb assault, military chiefs from the United States, Britain and France huddled here Sunday night in an attempt to devise a united policy for protecting the remaining Bosnian "safe areas." Any tangible results were unclear: After the evening meeting at the Defense Ministry in central London, the military leaders--Gen. John M. Shalikashvili, chairman of the U.S. Joint Chiefs of Staff, British Field Marshal Peter Inge and French Adm.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | From Associated Press
As the last of Rwanda's refugee camps was emptied Sunday, it was reported that 14 people had been beaten and stoned to death when they returned home, prompting a U.N. envoy to suggest it may be time to give peacekeepers the power to protect civilians. About 3,400 refugees were trucked back to their villages from the Ndera camp near Kigali, clearing the last official refugee center in the Central African country.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | From Times Wire Services
Leaders of seven East and Central African countries adopted a strategy Saturday to combat insecurity in the aftermath of Rwanda's genocide and to encourage more than 2 million refugees to go home. Meanwhile, shooting broke out Saturday in a refugee camp in southern Rwanda, killing at least 12 people and wounding 36, a U.N. source said. The incident was the worst single case of violence yet in the refugee camps throughout the region.
NEWS
September 6, 1994 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Though another panicky flight of Rwandans may be the outcome, Rwanda's government began a three-stage operation Monday to quickly assert its authority in the U.N.-policed "safe zone," where fears of its wrath and rule triggered an exodus last month.
NEWS
August 30, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hutu zealots killed another Hutu refugee who had urged Rwandans to return home, continuing a deadly campaign of intimidation in Zaire's teeming refugee camps. The unidentified man was beaten and stoned to death Saturday in the Kitaku refugee camp, Ray Wilkinson, a spokesman for the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, said.
NEWS
August 20, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The night before, the sky had blazed with lightning and the rain had fallen hard enough to bounce off the rocks. A new breed of angry young thugs had gone marauding. Friday morning, it rains again, a mountain rain with a chill to it. The people rise from the ground to count their losses, if they still have anything left to lose. So begins another day: The blue 1 1/2-ton trucks start down the narrow, potholed roads on their twice-a-day rounds to gather up the bodies.
NEWS
August 17, 1994 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From the bed of a pickup truck in the red mud of an African hilltop, one enemy reached out to another Tuesday in a desperate overture to save what is left of a nation. Here in a "safe zone" of Rwanda, protected by French marines, a delegation from the nation's new government stood before thousands of followers of the defeated old government. Their message: Don't flee. Don't create another refugee crisis for the world. Don't be afraid. Rebuild Rwanda. About 1.
NEWS
August 15, 1994 | From Reuters
Three ministers of the new Tutsi-led Rwandan government paid an unprecedented visit to the French protected "safe zone" in southwest Rwanda on Sunday to tell frightened Hutu refugees it was safe to return home. But their emotional appeal was met with skepticism and outright hostility by the refugees, even as French protectors vowed to pull out of the zone by a scheduled Aug. 22 deadline.
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