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NEWS
April 19, 1999 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This hamlet wedged high in the mountains is nothing more than a hundred stone huts at the end of a dirt road. Its people are sheepherders or farmers who work patches of land with horse and plow as close as 50 feet to the border with Kosovo. Nonetheless, it is an extraordinary place. Beginning around 2 a.m. Saturday and continuing through Sunday, more than 3,500 Kosovo Albanian refugees inundated the 400 or so Albanian Macedonians who live here.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1999 | MARGARET RAMIREZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time Sanije Ymeri spoke to her older brother from her Hollywood home, all he could say was "I'm hungry sister, so very hungry." Soon after in April, 61-year-old Kemajl Ymeri, his wife, Azize, and their seven children were purged from their home in the Kosovo city of Mitrovica by Serbian police. For 35 anguishing days, the family walked and walked, pushing their father's frail body in a wheelbarrow, his lung cancer worsening every day.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1993 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For about a year now, the Primer family has been riveted to the television. Death counts from their disintegrating homeland of Bosnia drone on inside their Mission Viejo apartment. They flip on the electronic images of destruction upon awakening each morning and shut off the talking heads just before going to bed. Even their 2-year-old daughter Andrea's bright blue eyes recognize the ever-present CNN Headline News on the screen.
NEWS
June 4, 1999 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and JANET WILSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Through 10 weeks of relentless bombing, the United States and its allies endlessly repeated the conditions for ending the conflict over Kosovo. But when Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic said Thursday that he would accept its demands, NATO was surprisingly unprepared for success. If Milosevic pulls his troops out of Kosovo within days, NATO will have no more time than that to deploy a peacekeeping force that is not yet fully assembled and for which planning is not yet complete.
NEWS
April 16, 1999 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For politicians and war planners, "smart" weapons have replaced the broadsword with a rapier. But after at least one laser-guided bomb went awry in Kosovo, killing ethnic Albanian refugees, Western leaders were quick to point out that in wartime, even a rapier has its limits. By making pinpoint accuracy possible for allied warplanes, "precision-guided" munitions have made bombing more like surgery than slaughter.
NEWS
April 9, 1999
ERANDA RUDARI, 28, obstetrics nurse ' Where will I have my baby?' For a week, Eranda Rudari had been hearing that Serbian forces were running people out of their homes in Kosovo. But she kept telling herself that they would not get to her apartment building in Pristina, the capital. And, if they did, they would not evict a woman who was 9 months pregnant, she figured.
NEWS
June 22, 1992 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a seaside catch basin for the victims of the war in Bosnia-Herzegovina, the women of Sarajevo share all that they have left: meager charity rations, relief that their children are safe, hopes of seeing their husbands again and a sad conviction that the world is unmoved by their misery.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before praying, Hassan Rizk stood outside a Reseda mosque passing out sugary dates and tiny cups of zamzam, or holy water. Dressed in a white desert robe with a turban on his head, he clasped hands with worshipers and blessed them. This is his routine every Friday, Islam's holy day. A Palestinian immigrant, Rizk is usually critical of American foreign policy. But not when it comes to the conflict in Kosovo. "I support what America is doing," he said.
NEWS
April 24, 1999 | Reuters
A toll-free telephone number has been set up for people who have relatives among the Kosovo refugees or who may want to assist in the relocation of the refugees to the United States, the State Department said Friday. The number is: (800) 727-4420. It was established with U.S. funding by InterAction, a coalition of more than 160 U.S.-based private relief, development and refugee assistance agencies.
NEWS
January 15, 1998 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Tears welled in the pale eyes of Danica Trbojevic. The Croatian owner of the house that Trbojevic, 65, has occupied for the last six years is threatening to throw her out. She and her neighbors, all Serbian refugees, are being badgered by Croats eager to come home once this last piece of Serb-held Croatia returns to Croatian rule today. "The owner warned us that no one can protect us day and night," Trbojevic said Wednesday as she added firewood to a stove that heated the small kitchen.
NEWS
May 23, 1999 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the crest of a mountain overlooking the green fields of his homeland, Besir Haliti's blood drained into the snow. The 14-year-old Kosovo Albanian already had suffered enough of war: Serbs burning homes around his town, the flight of family and friends, a 20-hour trek through mountains to refuge in Macedonia. But with safety in sight, one more moment of savagery awaited.
NEWS
May 23, 1999 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fatmir Tresi has been living in two worlds since ethnic Albanians from Kosovo started flooding across the border near here almost two months ago. One is his ordinary, usually happy, sometimes mundane world as a second-grade teacher, husband and father. The other is the demanding, sometimes horrifying, always emotionally draining world as a lieutenant in a home-grown army of volunteer relief workers.
NEWS
April 24, 1999 | Reuters
A toll-free telephone number has been set up for people who have relatives among the Kosovo refugees or who may want to assist in the relocation of the refugees to the United States, the State Department said Friday. The number is: (800) 727-4420. It was established with U.S. funding by InterAction, a coalition of more than 160 U.S.-based private relief, development and refugee assistance agencies.
NEWS
April 19, 1999 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This hamlet wedged high in the mountains is nothing more than a hundred stone huts at the end of a dirt road. Its people are sheepherders or farmers who work patches of land with horse and plow as close as 50 feet to the border with Kosovo. Nonetheless, it is an extraordinary place. Beginning around 2 a.m. Saturday and continuing through Sunday, more than 3,500 Kosovo Albanian refugees inundated the 400 or so Albanian Macedonians who live here.
NEWS
April 16, 1999 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For politicians and war planners, "smart" weapons have replaced the broadsword with a rapier. But after at least one laser-guided bomb went awry in Kosovo, killing ethnic Albanian refugees, Western leaders were quick to point out that in wartime, even a rapier has its limits. By making pinpoint accuracy possible for allied warplanes, "precision-guided" munitions have made bombing more like surgery than slaughter.
NEWS
April 16, 1999 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
NATO's acknowledgment that one of its pilots had accidentally bombed a column of Kosovo Albanian refugees doesn't begin to explain how scores of people were killed in what survivors say was a series of airstrikes. A Times journalist who visited three sites that were attacked along a 12-mile stretch of highway in southwestern Kosovo counted at least 14 dead--some incinerated or decapitated by Wednesday's bomb blasts.
NEWS
October 2, 1998 | PAUL WATSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The war ruins of a Coca-Cola plant here don't offer much in the way of furniture, so the first arrivals from Kosovo had to make do. Stuff a cushion into a plastic Coke crate, and it becomes a baby's chair. Lie down on a wooden pallet scavenged from the warehouse, and you have a bed. And the empty ammo crate that carried a dozen 60-millimeter mortar bombs for Serbian fighters on Bosnia's former front line makes a fine stool now that the war is raging in another place: This time, in your homeland.
NEWS
August 20, 1995 | TRACY WILKINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overwhelmed by the arrival this month of more than 150,000 desperate and angry Serbian refugees, Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic resorted to a tried-and-true technique: He ordered television to restrain its coverage of the influx. No pictures of the masses on tractors crossing the border, or of the families languishing in processing centers. Emphasis on the donations of food and clothing.
NEWS
April 11, 1999 | JEFFREY GETTLEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before praying, Hassan Rizk stood outside a Reseda mosque passing out sugary dates and tiny cups of zamzam, or holy water. Dressed in a white desert robe with a turban on his head, he clasped hands with worshipers and blessed them. This is his routine every Friday, Islam's holy day. A Palestinian immigrant, Rizk is usually critical of American foreign policy. But not when it comes to the conflict in Kosovo. "I support what America is doing," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1999 | STEPHANIE STASSEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The worn, desperate faces of the Kosovo refugees have touched the hearts of many Americans, including the leaders of two area organizations who are raising money for relief efforts. Prompted by president-elect Stephen Veres who 42 years ago fled Communist Hungary and spent several months in a refugee camp in Korneuburg, Austria, the Kiwanis Club of Burbank is accepting donations for Kosovo relief.
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