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Refugees Somalia

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NEWS
December 15, 1989 | Associated Press
The voluntary repatriation of tens of thousands of Ethiopians who sought refuge in Somalia 12 years ago during a war between Ethiopia and Somalia should begin in March, officials said Thursday. The refugees are predominantly ethnic Somali Ethiopians who fled the fighting during the two nations' war in 1977-78 over a piece of arid land in southeastern Ethiopia called the Ogaden. The number of refugees has never been certain. Somalia says there are 700,000, the Office of the U.N.
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NEWS
May 21, 1999 | T. CHRISTIAN MILLER and ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When veteran refugee worker Lynne Miller arrived here from Africa earlier this month, she stepped into a different world. Miller had just spent three years monitoring food supplies at a remote refugee camp in Somalia, and one of her first crises in Macedonia was an urgent request from a medical team. A diabetic refugee had crossed the border. Could she provide a special diet? She couldn't believe what she was hearing, much less that she was able to fulfill the request.
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SPORTS
December 15, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Returning home to Somalia after winning the 1,500 meters in track and field's 1987 World Championships, Abdi Bile discovered during a visit to the capital city of Mogadishu that he had inspired a running boom. "I couldn't believe how excited the young men were about my race," he said. "You couldn't drive in the streets because there were so many people running. I thought there must be a cross-country race going on, but I was told, 'No, it's just young people who want to run like you.'
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 28, 1995 | LILY DIZON
Eight-year-old Fartun Mohamed had been walking around with a bullet lodged in her brain for four years, a reminder of the civil war in her homeland of Somalia. Doctors there told her family nothing could be done to remove the round. This week, however, they were proven wrong when a neurosurgeon from Western Medical Center here successfully removed the high-caliber, Soviet-made bullet. Dr. Mark E.
SPORTS
December 15, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over dinner one recent night at a restaurant near the corner of Wilshire and Vermont in Los Angeles, Ahmed Abdi Dahir pointed toward Somalia's Olympic Committee. "It is all in here," he said, tapping his head with his forefinger. "We had a building in Mogadishu, but it, like everything else in the capital city, has been destroyed in the civil war. There is not even one file left, not one." Dahir is best known in the West as a humanitarian. As director of the Somali Relief Rehabilitation Assn.
NEWS
June 27, 1992 | From Reuters
More than 1.5 million Somalis may starve to death unless the world helps the eastern African nation, which has been ravaged by war and drought, a U.N. official said Friday. "Without an immediate injection of support from the international community, the lives of over 1.5 million Somalis are under threat," Ian MacLeod, a U.N. Children's Fund official in the Somali capital of Mogadishu, said in a statement.
NEWS
November 19, 1992 | From Associated Press
Desperate Somali refugees drank seawater in the last days of a harrowing two weeks spent crammed into the holds and on the deck of a decrepit freighter that sailed into Aden harbor Wednesday. After food and water supplies aboard ship dwindled to nothing, some of the more than 2,000 men, women and children became convinced that after escaping gun battles and famine in their native land they were destined to die on the Indian Ocean. "For three days we had no water, no food, no hope.
NEWS
January 26, 1991 | From United Press International
Nearly 100,000 refugees have fled war-torn Somalia into neighboring countries in the past month, as fighting in the Somali capital of Mogadishu has reduced the city to chaos, officials said Friday. Most of the refugees have fled north and west to Ethiopia, where an Interior Ministry spokesman said 84,000 refugees had arrived in four weeks.
NEWS
September 22, 1988
Ethiopia is facing a "flash flood" of refugees from Sudan and Somalia, with more than 750,000 pouring over the borders in recent months, a top U.N. official reported. "The Sudanese and Somali refugees are surging into Ethiopia in an alarming proportion," said Arthur Dewey, deputy director of the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees.
NEWS
January 7, 1991 | From Times Wire Services
Evacuees from Somalia's capital on Sunday told of a city in smoke, with large sections blasted and burned in street battles between rebel and government forces that left "corpses decomposing everywhere." The rebels said Sunday they had launched their final offensive to end President Mohamed Siad Barre's 21-year rule in the Horn of Africa nation of 8 million. The rebels say more than 1,500 people have died in eight days of fighting.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | Reuters
Clan battles drove up to 5,000 people out of the southern port of Kismayu, and a grenade blast forced aid agencies Saturday to pull all foreign staff out of a central Somali town for the first time in two years. The battles in Kismayu, gateway to the fertile south, were the worst in six months. U.N. officers see the port as a prime flash point for renewed civil war with the pullout of U.S. troops and their Western allies from Somalia by March 31.
NEWS
October 4, 1993 | Associated Press
A human rights group has accused Kenya of failing to protect Somali women refugees from rape. The government has shown "an appalling lack of concern for the plight of Somali refugees," the New York-based Africa Watch said in a report released Sunday. Victims of rape and sexual assault in and around Kenya's refugee camps ranged from 4-year-old girls to 50-year-old women, the report said. Most victims were also robbed, beaten, knifed or shot, it said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 1992 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The office of the Somali Relief and Rehabilitation Assn. is no larger than a walk-in closet. It has no desk, chair or filing cabinet. Its furnishings amount to a telephone, an answering machine and wall-to-wall carpeting. By most measures, the windowless alcove would seem nothing to celebrate about.
SPORTS
December 15, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Over dinner one recent night at a restaurant near the corner of Wilshire and Vermont in Los Angeles, Ahmed Abdi Dahir pointed toward Somalia's Olympic Committee. "It is all in here," he said, tapping his head with his forefinger. "We had a building in Mogadishu, but it, like everything else in the capital city, has been destroyed in the civil war. There is not even one file left, not one." Dahir is best known in the West as a humanitarian. As director of the Somali Relief Rehabilitation Assn.
SPORTS
December 15, 1992 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Returning home to Somalia after winning the 1,500 meters in track and field's 1987 World Championships, Abdi Bile discovered during a visit to the capital city of Mogadishu that he had inspired a running boom. "I couldn't believe how excited the young men were about my race," he said. "You couldn't drive in the streets because there were so many people running. I thought there must be a cross-country race going on, but I was told, 'No, it's just young people who want to run like you.'
NEWS
November 19, 1992 | From Associated Press
Desperate Somali refugees drank seawater in the last days of a harrowing two weeks spent crammed into the holds and on the deck of a decrepit freighter that sailed into Aden harbor Wednesday. After food and water supplies aboard ship dwindled to nothing, some of the more than 2,000 men, women and children became convinced that after escaping gun battles and famine in their native land they were destined to die on the Indian Ocean. "For three days we had no water, no food, no hope.
NEWS
February 13, 1994 | Reuters
Clan battles drove up to 5,000 people out of the southern port of Kismayu, and a grenade blast forced aid agencies Saturday to pull all foreign staff out of a central Somali town for the first time in two years. The battles in Kismayu, gateway to the fertile south, were the worst in six months. U.N. officers see the port as a prime flash point for renewed civil war with the pullout of U.S. troops and their Western allies from Somalia by March 31.
NEWS
October 4, 1993 | Associated Press
A human rights group has accused Kenya of failing to protect Somali women refugees from rape. The government has shown "an appalling lack of concern for the plight of Somali refugees," the New York-based Africa Watch said in a report released Sunday. Victims of rape and sexual assault in and around Kenya's refugee camps ranged from 4-year-old girls to 50-year-old women, the report said. Most victims were also robbed, beaten, knifed or shot, it said.
NEWS
October 7, 1992 | MARY WILLIAMS WALSH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Canada's openness to refugees from around the world has made it an unwitting haven for war criminals from Somalia, a respected Canadian television program says. The report, aired Tuesday by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. program "the fifth estate," asserted that a "rat line," or organized escape route for war criminals, has led from Somalia to Canada through the United States.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. and Kenyan governments on Friday averted a showdown over an American relief airlift to Somalia and northern Kenya, clearing the way for two flights during the day to aid refugees and displaced persons in Kenyan camps. But there was still no indication of when the first flights might be made into Somalia, where more than 1.5 million people face imminent starvation. The Kenya-U.S. agreement came a day after Kenya protested what it called a violation of its airspace by U.S.
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