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Refugees South Korea

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NEWS
September 30, 1999 | SANG-HUN CHOE CHARLES J. HANLEY and MARTHA MENDOZA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It was a story no one wanted to hear: Early in the Korean War, villagers said, American soldiers machine-gunned hundreds of helpless civilians under a railroad bridge in the South Korean countryside. When the families spoke out, seeking redress, they met only rejection and denial, from the U.S. military and from their own government in Seoul. Now a dozen veterans have spoken too, and support their story with haunting memories from a "forgotten" war.
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NEWS
November 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
A U.S. veteran of the Korean War on Thursday tearfully hugged five survivors of an alleged mass killing of civilian refugees by American soldiers in the early days of the conflict. Former Lt. Edward L. Daily of Clarksville, Tenn., traveled to South Korea to talk to survivors about the incident at No Gun Ri village in July 1950. "Just think of the mental anguish and pain that they have endured over the years. They expressed that today, and I recognized that," Daily said. On Sept.
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NEWS
October 14, 1999 | SANG-HUN CHOE and CHARLES J. HANLEY and MARTHA MENDOZA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
On a single day in August 1950, six weeks into the Korean War, a U.S. general and other Army officers ordered the destruction of two strategic bridges as South Korean refugees streamed across, killing hundreds of civilians, according to former soldiers, Korean witnesses and U.S. military documents. Ex-GIs told of the bridge demolitions and two other incidents, machine-gun and mortar attacks on refugees, during interviews about what happened at No Gun Ri, South Korea, in late July 1950.
NEWS
October 14, 1999 | SANG-HUN CHOE and CHARLES J. HANLEY and MARTHA MENDOZA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
On a single day in August 1950, six weeks into the Korean War, a U.S. general and other Army officers ordered the destruction of two strategic bridges as South Korean refugees streamed across, killing hundreds of civilians, according to former soldiers, Korean witnesses and U.S. military documents. Ex-GIs told of the bridge demolitions and two other incidents, machine-gun and mortar attacks on refugees, during interviews about what happened at No Gun Ri, South Korea, in late July 1950.
NEWS
November 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
A U.S. veteran of the Korean War on Thursday tearfully hugged five survivors of an alleged mass killing of civilian refugees by American soldiers in the early days of the conflict. Former Lt. Edward L. Daily of Clarksville, Tenn., traveled to South Korea to talk to survivors about the incident at No Gun Ri village in July 1950. "Just think of the mental anguish and pain that they have endured over the years. They expressed that today, and I recognized that," Daily said. On Sept.
WORLD
August 23, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
North Korea denounced South Korean authorities as "wicked terrorists" for orchestrating an airlift of 468 North Korean defectors and said the move was part of a plot to bring down the communist regime. Commenting on last month's operation to bring the refugees to South Korea from Vietnam, the North's official news agency said the defectors had been abducted and should be returned to the North. Seoul says the airlift was a humanitarian gesture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2006 | Valerie Reitman, Times Staff Writer
Six North Korean defectors -- the first refugees the U.S. has admitted from the totalitarian nation -- arrived in Southern California on Saturday bearing accounts of famine, sexual enslavement, torture and repression. The group was met at Los International Airport by leaders of four large Korean congregations in Southern California, all members of the Korean Church Coalition, which has pushed the government to take in North Korean refugees.
NEWS
May 27, 1996 | JIM MANN
In a way, the North Koreans are like the "freemen" in Montana. Maybe they should be called the "un-freemen." The un-freemen are holed up on their Pyongyang ranch, trying to escape from being called to account for their numerous transgressions. They are surrounded and friendless. Looking on from outside, the Americans, South Koreans and Japanese are wringing their hands, trying to decide how to get them out. Should we cut off the power?
NEWS
September 30, 1999 | SANG-HUN CHOE CHARLES J. HANLEY and MARTHA MENDOZA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It was a story no one wanted to hear: Early in the Korean War, villagers said, American soldiers machine-gunned hundreds of helpless civilians under a railroad bridge in the South Korean countryside. When the families spoke out, seeking redress, they met only rejection and denial, from the U.S. military and from their own government in Seoul. Now a dozen veterans have spoken too, and support their story with haunting memories from a "forgotten" war.
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