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Refugees South Ossetia

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NEWS
May 21, 1992 | Reuters
Suspected Georgian militants fired on a bus taking refugees out of South Ossetia on Wednesday, killing more than 30 people and dealing a blow to talks to end violence in the breakaway region. The Russian Itar-Tass news agency said the gunmen struck outside a village near Tskhinvali, capital of South Ossetia, which for more than two years has been locked in a bloody fight to break away from Georgian control.
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NEWS
May 21, 1992 | Reuters
Suspected Georgian militants fired on a bus taking refugees out of South Ossetia on Wednesday, killing more than 30 people and dealing a blow to talks to end violence in the breakaway region. The Russian Itar-Tass news agency said the gunmen struck outside a village near Tskhinvali, capital of South Ossetia, which for more than two years has been locked in a bloody fight to break away from Georgian control.
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WORLD
August 16, 2008 | Megan K. Stack, Times Staff Writer
They squat in abandoned buildings, crash in rickety schoolhouses or sleep under bushes and trees. They stumble into the city wooden-faced and traumatized, children in tow, with little or nothing but the clothes they were wearing when they fled their houses. Tens of thousands of Georgians have been forced from their homes by days of fighting and Russian occupation, leaving this small country suddenly swamped in a major humanitarian crisis.
WORLD
September 13, 2004 | Kim Murphy, Times Staff Writer
Each day for 12 years, the rhythm of life in this village of scrap-metal lean-tos, plywood shacks and misery in North Ossetia has been the same. Those who have jobs in the nearest city hike up to the main road and flag down a passing car or, with luck, catch a bus. Later in the morning, the children set out for school, walking a mile and a half along roads that are often muddy or buried in snow. At 5 p.m. sharp, the water tap in the center of town opens up for precisely three hours.
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