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Refugees South Vietnam

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NEWS
May 1, 2000 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ceremony was meant to honor Vietnam War veterans from two countries, as well as the South Vietnamese refugee families who first arrived at Camp Pendleton after the fall of Saigon. It was intended as a simple, yet long overdue salute, and, organizers say, it was the only one of its kind in the nation. And for some who attended the "From War to Hope" service at the Marine base Sunday, it was all they wanted.
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NEWS
May 1, 2000 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ceremony was meant to honor Vietnam War veterans from two countries, as well as the South Vietnamese refugee families who first arrived at Camp Pendleton after the fall of Saigon. It was intended as a simple, yet long overdue salute, and, organizers say, it was the only one of its kind in the nation. And for some who attended the "From War to Hope" service at the Marine base Sunday, it was all they wanted.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2000 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ceremony was meant to honor both Vietnam veterans and the South Vietnamese refugee families who first arrived at Camp Pendleton after the fall of Saigon and the end of the war. It was intended as a simple, yet long overdue salute, and it was the only one of its kind in the nation. And for some who attended the "From War to Hope" service at the Marine base Sunday, it was all they wanted.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2000 | BONNIE HARRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The ceremony was meant to honor both Vietnam veterans and the South Vietnamese refugee families who first arrived at Camp Pendleton after the fall of Saigon and the end of the war. It was intended as a simple, yet long overdue salute, and it was the only one of its kind in the nation. And for some who attended the "From War to Hope" service at the Marine base Sunday, it was all they wanted.
NEWS
April 19, 1986 | DON IRWIN, Times Staff Writer
A special panel on Friday proposed revising policies governing immigration of Southeast Asians to give preference to "genuine refugees" and to require many relatives of nearly 800,000 Indochinese already here to follow regular procedures to obtain visas. The five-member commission, headed by former Iowa Gov. Robert D. Ray, recommended in a 95-page report that the two-tier approach be adopted after current procedures are phased out over a two-year transition period.
NEWS
April 28, 2000 | SCOTT MARTELLE and MAI TRAN, Times Staff Writers
As Vietnamese immigrants enter their second quarter-century of life in Orange County, a new poll finds that they have grown increasingly critical of Vietnam's Communist government and more attached to their adopted home. And while the poll of 400 Vietnamese adults in Orange County found refugees retain close cultural ties to their homeland, they are largely satisfied with their lives here, said Cheryl Katz of Baldassare Associates, which conducted the survey for The Times' Orange County edition.
NEWS
December 18, 1988 | STRAT DOUTHAT, Associated Press
As the morning mist lifts, groups of mostly older men and women, faces shielded from the sun by cone-shaped straw hats, make their way to a large, low-lying field to cultivate garden plots. It's a ritual startlingly reminiscent of scenes shown on television during the Vietnam War. But this is the Mississippi Delta, not the Mekong. "I have seen this same thing in Vietnam, many times," said Tu Pineda, an interpreter for Associated Catholic Charities of New Orleans.
NEWS
April 24, 2000 | SCOTT GOLD and MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
On a ragged dock in the Mississippi Delta, 50-year-old Rick Cao darns the nets of the Miss My Phuong, using both hands and a big toe to sort through a bird's nest of nylon. Soon, he'll shove off again to mine the Gulf of Mexico for shrimp, and he might go weeks without hearing a word of English on his marine radio. The Vietnamese, he explains, "are taking over the gulf." At an office park outside San Jose, 42-year-old Thinh Nguyen folds himself into his Acura after another 15-hour day.
NEWS
November 24, 2000 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Draped in gold-trimmed robes and sitting amid curls of burning incense, corpulent Buddha statuettes grin ear to ear, greeting visitors at storefronts and restaurants in Little Saigon, a pocket of Westminster that has become a commercial hub for flavors and wares from Vietnam. "Happiness is around the next corner," read one fortune cookie message that came with the dim sum lunch at the Dragon Phoenix Palace.
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