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Refugees Southeast Asia

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NEWS
March 18, 1991 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stooped over her vegetable patch, face tucked against the wet wind, the old woman spares no glance for the low-flying B-52. She has lived with the roar of American bombers a long time, in the Laos highlands and now in San Joaquin Valley almond country. Her patch of bok choy and onions grows on the edge of Merced, under the flight path of Castle Air Force Base. The long skirt, head scarf and shawl identify her as one of the peasants who is changing cowboy land .
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NEWS
January 28, 1997 | RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Khang Lai sees his entire life on the shelves and in the file cabinets of a small room on the third floor of UC Irvine's main library. The 23-year-old student picks a book off a shelf and thumbs through, nodding knowingly at the descriptions of Southeast Asian refugee camps, where he and his family lived after fleeing the Communist takeover of South Vietnam two decades ago.
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NEWS
November 18, 1987 | LEE MAY, Times Staff Writer
Renewed cooperation between the United States and Vietnam on refugee resettlement represents a "dramatic development" in efforts to combat problems of refugees in Southeast Asia, a State Department official says. Jonathan Moore, director of the Bureau for Refugee Programs, said in an interview Monday that Vietnam's recent resumption of the Orderly Departure Program means that fewer Vietnamese are risking their lives by trying to flee the country in boats.
NEWS
January 26, 1997 | RANDAL C. ARCHIBOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Khang Lai sees his entire life on the shelves and in the file cabinets of this small room on the third floor of UC Irvine's main library. The 23-year-old student picks up a book and thumbs through, nodding at the descriptions of Southeast Asian refugee camps, where he and his family lived after fleeing the Communist takeover in Vietnam two decades ago.
NEWS
February 9, 1987 | MARK ARAX, Times Staff Writer
When a Southeast Asian refugee on welfare chooses to work in the underground economy, it is often for reasons beyond simple greed. Resettlement workers and county officials say the formation of a vast underground economy must be viewed in the context of three decades of war in Vietnam and a United States that has embraced a million refugees from Southeast Asia without providing the proper training and assistance for self-sufficiency.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | CARL INGRAM and JILL STEWART, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Although the unemployment rate is at a relatively low 5% and Gov. George Deukmejian is fond of declaring that California "is now an economic powerhouse," the state's primary welfare program is growing twice as fast as its overall population. The governor predicts that the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program will grow by 5.4% next year, in what has become a trend in recent years.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | From Associated Press
Vietnam apparently has reversed a longstanding policy and agreed to take back "boat people" who are forcibly returned home, a U.N. official said Wednesday. Tens of thousands of Vietnamese have been denied refugee status but refuse to return home from several Southeast Asian countries and Hong Kong. More than 50,000 in Hong Kong alone are crowded in squalid, violence-ridden camps. To qualify for refugee status, the boat people must be found to be fleeing political persecution.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1988 | MARK ARAX, Times Staff Writer
American residents who were born in Southeast Asia are being charged $150 to $300 for visas to visit Thailand that cost others only $15. Unlike most visitors to Thailand, Americans who were born in Vietnam, Laos or Cambodia say they are unable to obtain their tourist visas from the Royal Thai Consulate in Los Angeles. Instead, they are being sent to one of four private visa agencies that are charging them much higher fees.
NEWS
May 25, 1996 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new wave of Hmong refugees appears to be headed for the San Joaquin Valley, daunting news in a heartland already struggling to absorb 65,000 members of the most ill-prepared immigrant group ever to land in America. About 3,000 Hmong, a tribal people from the highlands of Laos, are expected to arrive this summer from refugee camps in Thailand to be reunited with families.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When they arrived on the Gulf Coast a decade ago to take up fishing, Indochinese refugees found bitter resentment among many natives here. Now the immigrants are beginning to leave amid hard times in the fishing industry. And many of their neighbors are sorry to see them go. The exodus ironically comes as tensions between the newcomers and native-born fishermen had sunk beneath the surface of life in this Gulf of Mexico town of 49,000 people.
NEWS
May 25, 1996 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new wave of Hmong refugees appears to be headed for the San Joaquin Valley, daunting news in a heartland already struggling to absorb 65,000 members of the most ill-prepared immigrant group ever to land in America. About 3,000 Hmong, a tribal people from the highlands of Laos, are expected to arrive this summer from refugee camps in Thailand to be reunited with families.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | From Associated Press
Vietnam apparently has reversed a longstanding policy and agreed to take back "boat people" who are forcibly returned home, a U.N. official said Wednesday. Tens of thousands of Vietnamese have been denied refugee status but refuse to return home from several Southeast Asian countries and Hong Kong. More than 50,000 in Hong Kong alone are crowded in squalid, violence-ridden camps. To qualify for refugee status, the boat people must be found to be fleeing political persecution.
NEWS
June 6, 1991 | MARK PINSKY, Mark Pinsky is a Times staff writer who writes about the arts for The Times Orange County Edition.
For the eighth year, Orange Coast College's Vietnamese Student Assn. is sponsoring a benefit concert for children in Southeast Asian refugee camps, Saturday at the Robert B. Moore Theatre on the Costa Mesa campus. Money from the concert will go to refugee camps in Thailand and Hong Kong, according to Dat Than, faculty adviser to the Vietnamese student group.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1991 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many Southeast Asian refugees suffered extensive sexual abuse while fleeing their homelands, but few have received counseling or treatment since resettling in the state, social service officials say. The need for counseling might be especially acute in Orange County, which has one of the largest Vietnamese populations in the state and boasts growing Cambodian and Laotian refugee communities.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | KEVIN RODERICK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stooped over her vegetable patch, face tucked against the wet wind, the old woman spares no glance for the low-flying B-52. She has lived with the roar of American bombers a long time, in the Laos highlands and now in San Joaquin Valley almond country. Her patch of bok choy and onions grows on the edge of Merced, under the flight path of Castle Air Force Base. The long skirt, head scarf and shawl identify her as one of the peasants who is changing cowboy land .
NEWS
October 21, 1990 | DAN WEIKEL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the evening members of the Pomona Boys opened fire on Vietnamese diners at the My Nguyen Restaurant in Garden Grove, police heard from one potential witness after another--"I was in the restroom. I didn't see anything." The cafe's tiny lavatory must have been a tight squeeze. More than a dozen people said they happened to be in there the exact moment six patrons were shot, two fatally, as payback for a flirtatious look at a gang member's date.
NEWS
January 13, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
President Reagan's decision to increase quotas for Soviet emigres by cutting those for Southeast Asians has left many in Orange County's Vietnamese community feeling shocked, disappointed and abandoned. "As Vietnamese, we have strongly supported President Reagan because of his stand against communism. But his decision was a political one and this issue is a human one," said Ky Ngo, who came to the United States in 1975 and whose greatest concern has been the family he left in Vietnam.
NEWS
April 17, 1988
A study to determine whether Southeast Asian refugee students are likely to become economically self-sufficient has found that, although many of the students have high grade-point averages, they do not do well in state tests for reading, language expression, comprehension and vocabulary. The $38,000 study, which was paid for by the federal Office of Refugee Resettlement, focused on Indochinese students among 24,660 juniors and seniors in San Diego-area schools over an 18-month period.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration served notice Friday that it is willing to go along with a proposal to make it easier for Asian governments to return Indochinese "boat people" to their former homes in Vietnam and Cambodia. Secretary of State James A. Baker III announced that the United States, for the first time, will accept a plan under which Vietnamese or Cambodians who have fled from Indochina will be sent home whenever they "do not object" to repatriation. Appearing at a meeting of the Assn.
NEWS
April 2, 1990 | LEE MAY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When they arrived on the Gulf Coast a decade ago to take up fishing, Indochinese refugees found bitter resentment among many natives here. Now the immigrants are beginning to leave amid hard times in the fishing industry. And many of their neighbors are sorry to see them go. The exodus ironically comes as tensions between the newcomers and native-born fishermen had sunk beneath the surface of life in this Gulf of Mexico town of 49,000 people.
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