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Refugees Spain

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NEWS
November 14, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All summer, as Spaniards watched with incomprehension and distaste, homeless African refugees camped in a landmark plaza watched over by a doleful statue of Don Quixote. It was a downtown stage starkly set with the paramount symbol of the old insular Spain and harbingers of a new multiracial society. Both are players in a nascent drama abrasive and bewildering to both. "Madrid is not like the other European capitals. . . . Spain has been closed so long that people don't know about blacks.
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NEWS
November 14, 1990 | WILLIAM D. MONTALBANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All summer, as Spaniards watched with incomprehension and distaste, homeless African refugees camped in a landmark plaza watched over by a doleful statue of Don Quixote. It was a downtown stage starkly set with the paramount symbol of the old insular Spain and harbingers of a new multiracial society. Both are players in a nascent drama abrasive and bewildering to both. "Madrid is not like the other European capitals. . . . Spain has been closed so long that people don't know about blacks.
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NEWS
December 13, 1985 | From Reuters
Police arrested a Cuban vice-consul, two embassy clerks and a professor today for trying to kidnap at gunpoint a political refugee who exile sources said was a top defector from Cuba's secret service. Witnesses told reporters the exile, a 50-year-old man who carried a briefcase, told them: "I carry very important documents. I don't care about the money."
NEWS
September 21, 1986 | ANDREW HIGGINS, Reuters
A side street of this ancient capital of the French Basque country boasts what may be the world's only Basque-language punk rock bar. Knock twice, mumble a greeting in the Basque tongue Euskera and the door opens on one of the most bizarre strongholds of the mysterious language. Against a backdrop of framed goat heads spattered with blood, twisted metal sculptures and scrawled political slogans, the clientele drink, dance and sing to the latest Basque-language hits imported from Spain.
OPINION
August 1, 2004 | Rebecca Solnit, Rebecca Solnit is the author of, among other books, "River of Shadows: Eadweard Muybridge and the Technological Wild West" and "Wanderlust: A History of Walking."
In 1939, when the dictator Francisco Franco declared an end to the Spanish Civil War, tens of thousands of refugees walked north over the Pyrenees, seeking shelter in France. They expected to be welcomed as defenders of democracy; instead many were forced into camps. A year later, the tide had turned, and refugees from the Third Reich and the Vichy regime began trickling from France into Spain, seeking passage out of Europe via Spanish or Portuguese ports.
NEWS
July 4, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Recalling the magic of this city in 1962, Argentine author Tomas Eloy Martinez wrote recently about an evening when he found himself on a balcony in illustrious company: novelists Carlos Fuentes of Mexico, Augusto Roa Bastos of Paraguay and Ernesto Sabato of Argentina.
NEWS
July 7, 1996 | SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Recalling the magic of this city in 1962, Argentine author Tomas Eloy Martinez wrote recently about an evening when he found himself on a balcony in illustrious company: novelists Carlos Fuentes of Mexico, Augusto Roa Bastos of Paraguay and Ernesto Sabato of Argentina.
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