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Refugees Sudan

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NEWS
June 3, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The worst cases lay in four long huts: hundreds of exhausted and emaciated boys who had walked two, three or four months across southern Sudan, eating only leaves and roots along the way. They were motionless, many of them naked, their long, thin legs stretched out on mats made of elephant grass. Each day, a few died. Nearby, under a small tent, were 50 youngsters who had nearly starved to death, recovered and now showed signs of mental disorders.
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NEWS
June 17, 2001 | From Associated Press
Ring Paulino Deng survived civil war in his native Sudan, four years of slavery and an arduous escape that eventually took him on a 6,400-mile journey to the United States. He died at age 19 with a knife in his chest outside the Nashville apartment where he had settled, the victim of a parking dispute. Family and friends can't believe his struggle ended this way. "We thought the United States was safe," said Deng's cousin, Mabior Manyok.
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NEWS
August 14, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
U.S. military helicopters on Sunday located the wreckage of a plane that crashed last Monday with Texas congressman Mickey Leland and 15 others aboard. Witnesses who visited the site said there were no survivors. U.S. rescue and recovery teams said that the plane hit a mountain about 4,300 feet above sea level, having missed clearing the peak by about 300 feet.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the throes of a civil war that left his wife, baby son and brother dead and made him the target of Muslim rebels, Moses Cirrilo fled Sudan for a free life in America. He thought that once the authorities heard his story, they would greet him with open arms and grant him political asylum. He never expected he would spend the next three years in jail, sometimes handcuffed and shackled, he said, "like a criminal."
NEWS
September 22, 1988
Ethiopia is facing a "flash flood" of refugees from Sudan and Somalia, with more than 750,000 pouring over the borders in recent months, a top U.N. official reported. "The Sudanese and Somali refugees are surging into Ethiopia in an alarming proportion," said Arthur Dewey, deputy director of the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees.
NEWS
April 11, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Islamic government here, saying it has undertaken a huge urban cleanup campaign, has forced hundreds of thousands of squatters and refugees from Sudan's southern civil war into remote desert camps, threatening them with disease, hunger and death as the temperature climbs, international relief workers and diplomats say.
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebecca Wani's odyssey began in 1992 when raiders attacked her village in southern Sudan, killing her father. She fled in panic, beginning a life among people she barely knew. Six years later, the 27-year-old stands forlornly outside a U.N. office in suburban Cairo, hoping to be granted a status that she reckons she richly deserves: refugee.
NEWS
April 15, 2001 | LISA GETTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the throes of a civil war that left his wife, baby son and brother dead and made him the target of Muslim rebels, Moses Cirrilo fled Sudan for a free life in America. He thought that once the authorities heard his story, they would greet him with open arms and grant him political asylum. He never expected he would spend the next three years in jail, sometimes handcuffed and shackled, he said, "like a criminal."
NEWS
June 17, 2001 | From Associated Press
Ring Paulino Deng survived civil war in his native Sudan, four years of slavery and an arduous escape that eventually took him on a 6,400-mile journey to the United States. He died at age 19 with a knife in his chest outside the Nashville apartment where he had settled, the victim of a parking dispute. Family and friends can't believe his struggle ended this way. "We thought the United States was safe," said Deng's cousin, Mabior Manyok.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Sudanese government has evicted about 400,000 squatters from their homes in Khartoum over the last three months, depositing them in a harsh desert area with no access to food, water or shelter, a U.S. official said Friday. The Sudanese action "amounts to a death sentence," said Andrew Natsios, head of the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance. The targets of the campaign are families who live on plots of land that are being reclaimed by their rightful owners.
NEWS
November 4, 2000 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past eight years, 17-year-old Martin Marial has shared a small mud-and-thatch hut with five other boys in a dusty, fly-infested refugee camp in northwestern Kenya. His parents are long dead. His bed has been a wicker mat; his bath, a tin bowl; his toilet, a hole in the ground; his one meal a day, a mushy mixture of ground corn and water. But his life has been consumed by one obsession: getting a good education.
NEWS
February 3, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The horsemen came by night, thundering from one mud-and-thatch hut to another, shooting and slashing men, women and children. Startled from his sleep, 6-year-old Gabriel Majok Bol jumped from the wicker mat that served as his bed. He, his parents and five siblings scattered. The sprawling settlement in southern Sudan was burned to the ground. Bol survived unharmed--and alone. He hasn't seen his family since that night 11 years ago, and thinks they probably are dead.
NEWS
May 5, 1998 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rebecca Wani's odyssey began in 1992 when raiders attacked her village in southern Sudan, killing her father. She fled in panic, beginning a life among people she barely knew. Six years later, the 27-year-old stands forlornly outside a U.N. office in suburban Cairo, hoping to be granted a status that she reckons she richly deserves: refugee.
NEWS
July 23, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As if rehearsed, the throng of skeletal figures emerged into the dry clearing as soon as the hum of the cargo plane was audible in the distance. They moved quickly, many scantily dressed in rags, most barefoot, all wearing a look of excitement--and despair. When the U.N. craft finally landed on the dirt-and-grass airstrip here in remote southern Sudan, the anxious welcome party almost came to blows in the frenzy to unload the cargo--sacks of sorghum.
NEWS
February 14, 1994 | From Associated Press
About 70,000 southern Sudanese fleeing an intense government bombing campaign against rebels have been stranded for a week without food near Uganda's border, a U.N. official said Sunday. The people, gathered about 30 miles east of the border town of Nimule, are medically "not very badly off, but they must be very hungry," said Sally Burnheim, spokeswoman for Operation Lifeline Sudan's office in Kenya.
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | Associated Press
Government bombing of rebel-controlled areas in southern Sudan has created an exodus of 100,000 people, many fleeing to nearby Uganda and Zaire, a church group reported. The New Sudan Council of Churches said the government began the bombing on July 26 and escalated it in early August. It forced more than 30,000 people to flee to Uganda. Another 70,000 sought refuge in Zaire or elsewhere in southern Sudan.
NEWS
August 18, 1993 | Associated Press
Government bombing of rebel-controlled areas in southern Sudan has created an exodus of 100,000 people, many fleeing to nearby Uganda and Zaire, a church group reported. The New Sudan Council of Churches said the government began the bombing on July 26 and escalated it in early August. It forced more than 30,000 people to flee to Uganda. Another 70,000 sought refuge in Zaire or elsewhere in southern Sudan.
NEWS
February 1, 1990 | From Reuters
For a lucky few in the besieged, refugee-jammed Sudanese city of Juba, $350 can buy space on a packed cargo plane to Khartoum. For others, there is virtually no escape. Refugees said that the Sudanese army is preventing thousands of frightened civilians from fleeing to rebel-held territory outside the town to escape shellfire, food shortages and the threat of rebel attack.
NEWS
April 11, 1992 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Islamic government here, saying it has undertaken a huge urban cleanup campaign, has forced hundreds of thousands of squatters and refugees from Sudan's southern civil war into remote desert camps, threatening them with disease, hunger and death as the temperature climbs, international relief workers and diplomats say.
NEWS
February 22, 1992 | From Associated Press
The Sudanese government has evicted about 400,000 squatters from their homes in Khartoum over the last three months, depositing them in a harsh desert area with no access to food, water or shelter, a U.S. official said Friday. The Sudanese action "amounts to a death sentence," said Andrew Natsios, head of the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance. The targets of the campaign are families who live on plots of land that are being reclaimed by their rightful owners.
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