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NEWS
February 5, 1994 | IAN MacWILLIAM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The tent is swept clean and the bedding neatly folded against the wall. Kalander Mahmadnazar sits cross-legged while his wife and daughters kneel behind a low table, covering their faces from the strangers at the door. "It's hard to live here in the winter," says Mahmadnazar, a refugee from Tajikistan. "But the Communists burned our houses. We escaped because they tried to kill us. They accused us of being Muslim extremists."
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NEWS
November 5, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after she was widowed and uprooted by war, Saipocho Kholikova returned here from a refugee camp and stood in the vine-covered portico of her home. Backed by escorts from the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, she confronted a warrior of the victorious Kulyabi clan who had moved into the four-room house. "They opened the gate and told him I am back and I would live here," Kholikova recalled, sitting cross-legged on the matted floor of her vacant living room.
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NEWS
November 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 800 people were killed or wounded when a refugee camp was attacked near the Tajik capital, Dushanbe, Radio Russia reported, quoting the Russian news agency Nega. In a brief report monitored by the British Broadcasting Corp., the radio said armed formations equipped with "state-of-the-art" combat equipment attacked the camp, which housed refugees from the Kurgan Tyube region of southern Tajikistan. There was no immediate official confirmation of the report.
NEWS
February 5, 1994 | IAN MacWILLIAM, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The tent is swept clean and the bedding neatly folded against the wall. Kalander Mahmadnazar sits cross-legged while his wife and daughters kneel behind a low table, covering their faces from the strangers at the door. "It's hard to live here in the winter," says Mahmadnazar, a refugee from Tajikistan. "But the Communists burned our houses. We escaped because they tried to kill us. They accused us of being Muslim extremists."
NEWS
December 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tajikistan plunged deeper into chaos as gun battles raged near the capital of Dushanbe and the Red Cross reported 80,000 refugees facing death in the south of the former Soviet republic. Dieter Pfaff, mission head of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Tajikistan, said at least 80,000 refugees who fled fighting in Shartuz, near the Afghan border, were now camped in cotton fields near the frontier in freezing cold.
NEWS
November 5, 1994 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two years after she was widowed and uprooted by war, Saipocho Kholikova returned here from a refugee camp and stood in the vine-covered portico of her home. Backed by escorts from the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees, she confronted a warrior of the victorious Kulyabi clan who had moved into the four-room house. "They opened the gate and told him I am back and I would live here," Kholikova recalled, sitting cross-legged on the matted floor of her vacant living room.
NEWS
December 6, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Tajikistan plunged deeper into chaos as gun battles raged near the capital of Dushanbe and the Red Cross reported 80,000 refugees facing death in the south of the former Soviet republic. Dieter Pfaff, mission head of the International Committee of the Red Cross in Tajikistan, said at least 80,000 refugees who fled fighting in Shartuz, near the Afghan border, were now camped in cotton fields near the frontier in freezing cold.
NEWS
November 22, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 800 people were killed or wounded when a refugee camp was attacked near the Tajik capital, Dushanbe, Radio Russia reported, quoting the Russian news agency Nega. In a brief report monitored by the British Broadcasting Corp., the radio said armed formations equipped with "state-of-the-art" combat equipment attacked the camp, which housed refugees from the Kurgan Tyube region of southern Tajikistan. There was no immediate official confirmation of the report.
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