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NEWS
December 18, 1996 | From Associated Press
Thousands of Rwandan refugees who had fled into the bush to escape being sent home are streaming back to the stripped-down camps they had abandoned, and some of the weaker ones are dying of hunger, thirst and exhaustion, a U.N. official said Tuesday. A spokesman for the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in Ngara near the border with Rwanda said up to 5,000 refugees were returning to Kitali and Keza camps every hour.
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NEWS
December 18, 1996 | From Associated Press
Thousands of Rwandan refugees who had fled into the bush to escape being sent home are streaming back to the stripped-down camps they had abandoned, and some of the weaker ones are dying of hunger, thirst and exhaustion, a U.N. official said Tuesday. A spokesman for the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees in Ngara near the border with Rwanda said up to 5,000 refugees were returning to Kitali and Keza camps every hour.
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NEWS
December 13, 1996 | Associated Press
Hutu militants forced hundreds of thousands of Rwandan refugees to abandon U.N. camps in northwestern Tanzania on Thursday and hide in nearby forests to avoid going home, aid workers said. Tanzania, which borders Rwanda, has the largest remaining population of Rwandan refugees--535,000 people--and says they all must leave by Dec. 31. By late Thursday, at least four huge camps--Lumasi, Kitali, Mushuhura and Benaco--that used to hold about 390,000 refugees were nearly empty.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | From Associated Press
Balancing bundles of food and clothing on their heads, Rwandan refugees who previously refused to return home began crossing a narrow concrete bridge over a waterfall Saturday to reenter Rwanda after 2 1/2 years in Tanzania. Earlier, Tanzanian soldiers and police had surrounded camps in the northwestern Ngara area and ordered the refugees to move out. Aid workers said they hoped all 535,000 Rwandan Hutus remaining in Tanzania would return home. "I'm very glad to be in Rwanda.
NEWS
December 14, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
One day after hundreds of thousands of Rwandan refugees in Tanzania defied an order to leave the country by fleeing their camps and marching into surrounding hills and forests, most reversed direction and turned toward home--although few actually crossed the border. By late Friday afternoon, many of the estimated 400,000 Rwandans who were on the move Thursday had returned to the sites they had abandoned.
NEWS
December 6, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Encouraged by the peaceful welcome that Rwanda has given refugees returning from Zaire, the government of Tanzania said it would start sending home the half-million Rwandan refugees in its country. The return from Tanzania would all but eliminate the need for a proposed, Canadian-led international military mission on behalf of refugees, Canada's defense minister said.
NEWS
December 15, 1996 | From Associated Press
Balancing bundles of food and clothing on their heads, Rwandan refugees who previously refused to return home began crossing a narrow concrete bridge over a waterfall Saturday to reenter Rwanda after 2 1/2 years in Tanzania. Earlier, Tanzanian soldiers and police had surrounded camps in the northwestern Ngara area and ordered the refugees to move out. Aid workers said they hoped all 535,000 Rwandan Hutus remaining in Tanzania would return home. "I'm very glad to be in Rwanda.
NEWS
January 19, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
About 15,000 Rwandans, who had fled to Burundi as ethnic slaughter erupted in their homeland in 1994, streamed out of a refugee camp to escape an outbreak of the same Hutu-Tutsi bloodshed in northern Burundi. About 10,000 of them had crossed into Tanzania by nightfall, said Hitoshi Misa of the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees. Tanzania had not decided whether to allow the Rwandans to stay.
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | From Associated Press
Women balanced heavy bundles on their heads and men pushed bicycles piled high with possessions Monday on the road from Tanzania to Rwanda, which was crowded with Hutu refugees as far as the eye could see. By evening, more than 100,000 people, some carrying ducks and chickens, others herding goats and cows, had crossed into their home country after 2 1/2 years in Tanzanian refugee camps. Some took shortcuts through fields of bright yellow sunflowers.
NEWS
May 3, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Defense Secretary William J. Perry on Monday endorsed a proposal for a U.N. military expedition to stop massacres in Rwanda and promised American support--short of combat troops--for such a venture. Describing the carnage in the tiny Central African country as "a world-scale humanitarian tragedy," Perry told Times reporters at a breakfast meeting here that U.N. Security Council action to reduce the bloodshed there should be "a top priority."
NEWS
December 14, 1996 | From Times Wire Services
One day after hundreds of thousands of Rwandan refugees in Tanzania defied an order to leave the country by fleeing their camps and marching into surrounding hills and forests, most reversed direction and turned toward home--although few actually crossed the border. By late Friday afternoon, many of the estimated 400,000 Rwandans who were on the move Thursday had returned to the sites they had abandoned.
NEWS
December 13, 1996 | Associated Press
Hutu militants forced hundreds of thousands of Rwandan refugees to abandon U.N. camps in northwestern Tanzania on Thursday and hide in nearby forests to avoid going home, aid workers said. Tanzania, which borders Rwanda, has the largest remaining population of Rwandan refugees--535,000 people--and says they all must leave by Dec. 31. By late Thursday, at least four huge camps--Lumasi, Kitali, Mushuhura and Benaco--that used to hold about 390,000 refugees were nearly empty.
NEWS
December 6, 1996 | From Times Wire Reports
Encouraged by the peaceful welcome that Rwanda has given refugees returning from Zaire, the government of Tanzania said it would start sending home the half-million Rwandan refugees in its country. The return from Tanzania would all but eliminate the need for a proposed, Canadian-led international military mission on behalf of refugees, Canada's defense minister said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 28, 1994 | GEORGE B. N. AYITTEY, George B. N. Ayittey, a Ghanaian, is an associate professor of economics at American University and president of the Free Africa Foundation in Washington.
Rwanda evokes visceral reaction from Africans living here in the United States. "I don't want to think about it; it's a disgrace to Africa and it's too close to home," says Anita Shirima, a graduate student from Tanzania. "Rwanda is one more proof that the military is out of control in Africa," declares Reminglus Kintu, president of Uganda Democratic Coalition. "The complicity of Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni should not be overlooked in the Rwandan crisis," he adds.
BOOKS
August 4, 1996 | Carter Coleman, Carter Coleman was a stringer for Time magazine's Nairobi bureau. His first novel, "The Volunteer," set in East Africa, will be published next year by Warner Books
In the book of Genesis, Adam and Eve begot two sons: Abel, a shepherd, and Cain, a farmer. Envious of his brother Abel, whose gift of a firstborn from his flocks found higher regard in God's eyes than his own gift of crops, "Cain rose up against Abel his brother and he killed him." Cain was condemned to wander the Earth, protected, oddly, by God's proclamation that "whoever came upon him would not strike him down."
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