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Refugees Thailand

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NEWS
February 28, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Burmese soldiers crossed into Thailand in an attempt to raid a makeshift refugee camp housing thousands of ethnic Karens, but Thai troops halted the operation. About 2,300 refugees had taken shelter at an abandoned tin mine at Pu Nam Rawn, about 70 miles west of Bangkok, the Thai capital. The Burmese troops were repelled by a group of Thai self-defense volunteers.
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NEWS
May 3, 2000 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is a tearful little boy brought halfway around the world on heavy sedation and a false passport. He spent a week in the hospital fighting a cold, an ear infection and chickenpox. He clings to his social worker and cries if she leaves the room. The Immigration and Naturalization Service has already sent the man and woman posing as his parents back to Thailand. The agency had originally planned to repatriate Somsak Deema--who is either 2 or 3 years old--on Thursday.
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NEWS
March 31, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
A sad chapter in the history of Indochina's wars ended Tuesday when the largest Cambodian refugee camp in Southeast Asia was declared officially closed. Officials said 23,000 refugees remain at the camp, prosaically named Site 2, but are scheduled to leave at the end of April in time to return to Cambodia and take part in national elections there, which are being held May 25-27.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Burmese soldiers crossed into Thailand in an attempt to raid a makeshift refugee camp housing thousands of ethnic Karens, but Thai troops halted the operation. About 2,300 refugees had taken shelter at an abandoned tin mine at Pu Nam Rawn, about 70 miles west of Bangkok, the Thai capital. The Burmese troops were repelled by a group of Thai self-defense volunteers.
NEWS
May 3, 2000 | ANNE-MARIE O'CONNOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is a tearful little boy brought halfway around the world on heavy sedation and a false passport. He spent a week in the hospital fighting a cold, an ear infection and chickenpox. He clings to his social worker and cries if she leaves the room. The Immigration and Naturalization Service has already sent the man and woman posing as his parents back to Thailand. The agency had originally planned to repatriate Somsak Deema--who is either 2 or 3 years old--on Thursday.
NEWS
November 24, 1988 | KARI RENE HALL
Ten years ago, Vietnamese troops pushed hundreds of thousands of Cambodians across the border into refugee camps in Thailand. They have languished there since, though some of the refugees reportedly have become pawns in a recent, potential new round of battles between Vietnam and Cambodia. Site 2 South, the largest refugee camp on the Thai-Cambodian border, apparently is unaffected by this new tumult.
NEWS
March 3, 1989
Thailand has forced Laotians fleeing Communist persecution back to their homeland, where "hundreds, if not thousands" of them have died, a U.S. human rights group said in a report issued in Bangkok. The Lawyers Committee for Human Rights cited two cases in November, 1987, in which Laotian soldiers allegedly massacred groups of 33 and 16 Laotians just after they were evicted from Thai soil.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hung Hong has been a refugee since 1979. A former farmer from Battambang in western Cambodia, he has given up hope of ever going home. "I don't want to go back anymore," he told a visitor to this sprawling refugee camp along the Thai border north of the town of Aranyaprathet. "We get a lot of aid. It's not my land here, but it's better to stay here than live under the Communists." Pat Piek is also afraid to go home. She said she fled as Vietnam invaded Cambodia in 1979.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Haing Ngor, who portrayed Cambodian journalist Dith Pran in the film, "The Killing Fields," announced in Brussels Wednesday that he is seeking $300,000 to organize an emergency medical supply relay from Thailand to refugees in Cambodia. Ngor, a doctor, said he wants to train Cambodian refugees in Thailand to carry medical supplies across the border to camps in their native country. The plan had the support of the Thai government, he said.
NEWS
January 19, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Thailand intends to clear thousands of boat people from its refugee camps in the next two years, sending many of them back to Vietnam, a senior Thai official said today. Kasit Bhirom, director-general of the International Organizations Department, said the Thai government will make every effort to move about 12,000 refugees, most of them Vietnamese boat people, out of camps in Thailand. "They may either get the right to resettle in third countries or they will have to be repatriated," he said.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
A sad chapter in the history of Indochina's wars ended Tuesday when the largest Cambodian refugee camp in Southeast Asia was declared officially closed. Officials said 23,000 refugees remain at the camp, prosaically named Site 2, but are scheduled to leave at the end of April in time to return to Cambodia and take part in national elections there, which are being held May 25-27.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hung Hong has been a refugee since 1979. A former farmer from Battambang in western Cambodia, he has given up hope of ever going home. "I don't want to go back anymore," he told a visitor to this sprawling refugee camp along the Thai border north of the town of Aranyaprathet. "We get a lot of aid. It's not my land here, but it's better to stay here than live under the Communists." Pat Piek is also afraid to go home. She said she fled as Vietnam invaded Cambodia in 1979.
NEWS
March 3, 1989
Thailand has forced Laotians fleeing Communist persecution back to their homeland, where "hundreds, if not thousands" of them have died, a U.S. human rights group said in a report issued in Bangkok. The Lawyers Committee for Human Rights cited two cases in November, 1987, in which Laotian soldiers allegedly massacred groups of 33 and 16 Laotians just after they were evicted from Thai soil.
NEWS
November 24, 1988 | KARI RENE HALL
Ten years ago, Vietnamese troops pushed hundreds of thousands of Cambodians across the border into refugee camps in Thailand. They have languished there since, though some of the refugees reportedly have become pawns in a recent, potential new round of battles between Vietnam and Cambodia. Site 2 South, the largest refugee camp on the Thai-Cambodian border, apparently is unaffected by this new tumult.
NEWS
April 19, 1987 | From Reuters
An American group helping Cambodian refugees Friday petitioned the U.S. government to accept up to 12,000 people Washington had previously rejected for immigration. Citing a U.S. Supreme Court ruling last month easing rules for political asylum, the Cambodia Crisis Committee asked the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service to review the cases.
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