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Refugees Third World

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December 16, 1989 | Reuters
The United Nations' largest food agency said Friday it had approved about $125 million in food aid for more than 2 million refugees in the Third World. The World Food Program, part of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, said 346,000 tons of grains and other foods would be used to feed 2.6 million refugees and 830,000 people displaced by civil strife in Africa, Asia and Latin America.
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NEWS
December 16, 1989 | Reuters
The United Nations' largest food agency said Friday it had approved about $125 million in food aid for more than 2 million refugees in the Third World. The World Food Program, part of the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, said 346,000 tons of grains and other foods would be used to feed 2.6 million refugees and 830,000 people displaced by civil strife in Africa, Asia and Latin America.
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NEWS
February 12, 1987 | Associated Press
Representatives of 12 Western governments began three days of talks Wednesday on coordinating ways to handle the stream of Third World refugees into their countries. The informal meeting also was intended to increase cooperation with U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Jean-Pierre Hocke of Switzerland, who is attending the talks. The meeting in a castle outside Bern follows discussions last year in Stockholm and The Hague.
NEWS
February 12, 1987 | Associated Press
Representatives of 12 Western governments began three days of talks Wednesday on coordinating ways to handle the stream of Third World refugees into their countries. The informal meeting also was intended to increase cooperation with U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees Jean-Pierre Hocke of Switzerland, who is attending the talks. The meeting in a castle outside Bern follows discussions last year in Stockholm and The Hague.
NEWS
February 10, 1992 | LARRY B. STAMMER, TIMES ENVIRONMENTAL WRITER
Suppose all the predictions about climate change are right. What if global warming really causes sea levels to rise, flooding low-lying nations such as Bangladesh? What if the world's breadbaskets, including America, are devastated as crop-growing regions shift to more northern latitudes?
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1992 | ALEXANDER FRATER, Alexander Frater is chief travel correspondent for the Observer in London and the author of three books, most recently "Chasing the Monsoon," published last year by Knopf.
Remote, romantic, steeped in maritime lore, Cape Wrath marks one of the British mainland's most emphatic physical extremities--one that few Britons have ever seen. Standing miles from anywhere, in the remote northwesternmost corner of mainland Scotland, it may be reached by land only by following a difficult little Highland road built for lighthouse maintenance. Access by sea is much simpler, but what vessel is going to take you into those latitudes?
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