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Refugees Tibet

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NEWS
January 1, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unprecedented migration to the United States of Tibetan refugees, displaced by decades of Communist Chinese rule, will begin this year in an unusual resettlement that promises to reshape one of the smallest and most obscure minority groups in the nation. During the last 30 years, just 500 Tibetans have come to this country, scattered in tiny pockets from Los Angeles to Long Island.
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NEWS
February 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
A teenage monk who escaped Chinese-controlled Tibet last year has been granted refugee status in India, giving him more freedom to travel in the country, the Dalai Lama's exile government said Saturday. The 17th Karmapa--one of the most senior monks, or lamas, in Tibetan Buddhism and head of the Karma Kagyu sect--eluded the Chinese guards at his monastery in Tibet and trekked over the Himalayas to India. His movements were restricted after his arrival.
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NEWS
January 1, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unprecedented migration to the United States of Tibetan refugees, displaced by decades of Communist Chinese rule, will begin this year in an unusual resettlement that promises to reshape one of the smallest and most obscure minority groups in the nation. During the past 30 years, just 500 Tibetans have come to this country, scattered in tiny pockets from Los Angeles to Long Island.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1998 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a tale to tell the children sitting around the table after a festive dinner: How the pilgrims suffered political and religious persecution and decided to flee their homeland. How their journey proved long and perilous. How they arrived both fearful and hopeful in a new country and had to rely on the natives for their survival. And finally, how they came to celebrate their newfound home with a feast of thanksgiving.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Tibetans fleeing repression in their own land take one of the world's most harrowing paths to freedom. They climb across the Himalayas. Each year, Tibetans trying to escape the vise of Chinese rule set out across the world's highest mountains--and into blizzards, crevasses and ice--hoping to reach Nepal. The unlucky are captured or turned back by Chinese authorities. Or they die in the snow. The rest wander into this city frostbitten and starved, often missing fingers and toes.
NEWS
August 8, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The young Tibetan, an actor turned street vendor, was not surprised in the least when he heard about the Chinese army's bloody crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators in Beijing in June. A year earlier, he said, soldiers of that same army broke his right leg, cracked open his forehead with an electric cattle prod and beat him senseless every day for a month after he was caught taking part in pro-independence demonstrations in Tibet, which Chinese troops occupied in 1950.
NEWS
February 4, 2001 | From Associated Press
A teenage monk who escaped Chinese-controlled Tibet last year has been granted refugee status in India, giving him more freedom to travel in the country, the Dalai Lama's exile government said Saturday. The 17th Karmapa--one of the most senior monks, or lamas, in Tibetan Buddhism and head of the Karma Kagyu sect--eluded the Chinese guards at his monastery in Tibet and trekked over the Himalayas to India. His movements were restricted after his arrival.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 26, 1998 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It is a tale to tell the children sitting around the table after a festive dinner: How the pilgrims suffered political and religious persecution and decided to flee their homeland. How their journey proved long and perilous. How they arrived both fearful and hopeful in a new country and had to rely on the natives for their survival. And finally, how they came to celebrate their newfound home with a feast of thanksgiving.
BOOKS
May 10, 1992 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In a time of widespread demands for ethnic self-determination, the plight of Tibet, occupied by the Chinese since 1959, seems to have been forgotten. Prepared under the auspices of the Tibetan Aid Project, "From the Roof of the World" dramatizes the plight of the more than 100,000 refugees who have fled to India, Nepal and Bhutan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 1999 | CHRISTINE CASTRO
The Huntington Beach Church of Religious Science will offer an introduction to Tibetan beliefs Friday when monks of Gaden Shartse perform a sacred cleansing ritual. The monks come from Gaden Shartse Monastic College in South India, most of them refugees from Tibet. They are touring in hopes of raising money to maintain their monastery, which was built in 1969.
NEWS
April 14, 1998 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thousands of Tibetans fleeing repression in their own land take one of the world's most harrowing paths to freedom. They climb across the Himalayas. Each year, Tibetans trying to escape the vise of Chinese rule set out across the world's highest mountains--and into blizzards, crevasses and ice--hoping to reach Nepal. The unlucky are captured or turned back by Chinese authorities. Or they die in the snow. The rest wander into this city frostbitten and starved, often missing fingers and toes.
BOOKS
May 10, 1992 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In a time of widespread demands for ethnic self-determination, the plight of Tibet, occupied by the Chinese since 1959, seems to have been forgotten. Prepared under the auspices of the Tibetan Aid Project, "From the Roof of the World" dramatizes the plight of the more than 100,000 refugees who have fled to India, Nepal and Bhutan.
NEWS
January 1, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unprecedented migration to the United States of Tibetan refugees, displaced by decades of Communist Chinese rule, will begin this year in an unusual resettlement that promises to reshape one of the smallest and most obscure minority groups in the nation. During the past 30 years, just 500 Tibetans have come to this country, scattered in tiny pockets from Los Angeles to Long Island.
NEWS
January 1, 1992 | ASHLEY DUNN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An unprecedented migration to the United States of Tibetan refugees, displaced by decades of Communist Chinese rule, will begin this year in an unusual resettlement that promises to reshape one of the smallest and most obscure minority groups in the nation. During the last 30 years, just 500 Tibetans have come to this country, scattered in tiny pockets from Los Angeles to Long Island.
NEWS
August 8, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
The young Tibetan, an actor turned street vendor, was not surprised in the least when he heard about the Chinese army's bloody crackdown on pro-democracy demonstrators in Beijing in June. A year earlier, he said, soldiers of that same army broke his right leg, cracked open his forehead with an electric cattle prod and beat him senseless every day for a month after he was caught taking part in pro-independence demonstrations in Tibet, which Chinese troops occupied in 1950.
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